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Old 07-15-2013, 11:55 AM   #1
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connecting new to old?


hi -- I'm still at work on my new addition with appropriate variance in hand and have a simple/obvious question -- what are the best methods for connecting the new addition to the old structure? first I'm in Bergen County NJ up north. the addition is 18X18', two stories with a block crawlspace foundation. the floors between new and old do not line up -- and thats deliberate for reasons too long to go in to here. I understand that for the foundation typically rebar and epoxy is used -- in my case the old foundation is fieldstone and very irregular and I've seen folks that say that can help due to the irregularities. I'm more concerned about the framing connections tho. i know the siding comes off, does the sheathing need to? its new plywood from when i re-sided a few years back. thx as always! jp

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Old 07-15-2013, 01:26 PM   #2
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connecting new to old?


I removed the sheathing so I could install horizontal braces between the studs of the old house. The wall of the new house was then fastened to these braces. The sheathing isn't strong enough on its own.

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Old 07-15-2013, 04:30 PM   #3
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connecting new to old?


thank you. was along the lines I was thinking. also, since the floors do not line up, I also thought of adding braces to my own wall to then secure to the old floor?
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Old 07-16-2013, 09:40 AM   #4
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connecting new to old?


Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowkid
hi -- I'm still at work on my new addition with appropriate variance in hand
Just curious. What is an "appropriate variance"? To my knowledge in order to get a variance one must submit approved plans. Also, in order to get a building permit for a project of this size and scope, an engineer is typically involved. What does your engineer say about rebar and epoxy for a foundation? What does your engineer say about the existing flagstone foundation? I haven't read your other post yet but , You do have plans right?
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Old 07-16-2013, 10:20 AM   #5
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connecting new to old?


I'm not sure how your original walls/floors are built, but more bracing wouldn't be a bad thing. Best to chat with your building inspector as most likely he has seen it all before and can help you out.

My original foundation is stone and mortar and the new foundation was poured. You are right that it does 'key in' together, although I couldn't say if the same applies for a block foundation. If you have a foundation contractor he might have come across a similar scenario and have some advice. I ended up hiring an engineer on the advice of my building inspector because the new foundation was lower than the old foundation. Money well spent for some piece of mind.
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Old 07-16-2013, 03:01 PM   #6
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connecting new to old?


thanks -- my foundations will also be lower than the original. can I ask how you handled the area where the new wall butts the old foundation -- essentially that difference in height? and I've seen that a poured foundation does "key" in as you said -- i will be talking to the mason about a reco for block -- and the inspector as well. honestly tho my inspectors are a bit less helpful on solutions than it sounds in other areas.

as to the "appropriate variance" -- my house was built circa 1850 on 44 acres, and currently sits on one acre. so the town and streets developed around my home. the existing structure is whats called "pre-existing, non-conforming" in that zoning requires 50' set-backs on front and side yards (since i live on a corner I technically have two front yards) and the current structure meets neither requirement, but is grandfathered in. the addition I'm working on actually will sit on the side yard, and reduce the set-back considerably. given the circumstances of the property tho the Board granted me a variance for both the 18X18' addition and a wrap-around porch that goes out another 10'. what i was required to show was architectural drawings, a model etc which I developed myself. thats what the zoning board, town engineer and building inspector's office reviewed and approved. next step is to pull permits and for that i'm doing the working drawings as we speak, and of course am using an engineer to keep me honest. whats perhaps a bit unusual where i live is that I can do all the drawings, engineering myself if I'm building it as well. and thats the plan! with help of course!

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