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Old 08-14-2012, 08:07 PM   #1
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Concrete Piers for Deck - FAIL (help)


i guess the concrete poured by contractor late in the season was too late and the frost got at them.. come spring they have failed. severely deteriorating, the concrete is crumbling away from the metal post anchors to about 2" deep. Some piers i can lift out with my bare hands because 12 to 18" down it is completely broken and so i just lifts out. the total depth of the concrete pier is 4' on a footer.

contractor agreed to come back and fix (thank goodness!). his suggestion was to remove the concrete that can be lifted out. drill two holes into each 4" deep and sink some rebar into existing concrete which is in the ground. then pour concrete onto that up to grade (inside sonotube).

i think this solution is reasonable and will work. what is your opinion?

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Old 08-14-2012, 09:19 PM   #2
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Concrete Piers for Deck - FAIL (help)


As long as he epoxys the rebar. If its good enough for freeway road paving, I think it would be okay for a deck pier.

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Old 08-14-2012, 10:17 PM   #3
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Concrete Piers for Deck - FAIL (help)


^yep

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Old 08-14-2012, 11:31 PM   #4
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Concrete Piers for Deck - FAIL (help)


3 would be better... However I've built year round for a long time and NEVER had a pier fail, we've done a number of projects in the dead of winter and they're just fine. Did you use truck mix or bag mix? Probably bag mix, that stuff is such garbage.
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Old 08-15-2012, 09:14 PM   #5
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Concrete Piers for Deck - FAIL (help)


when using the epoxy, do you have to let it cure first before putting the concrete on top?

contractor used truck mix. he said it failed because of the sonotube .., if no sonotube the frost would not have been a problem.
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Old 08-15-2012, 09:33 PM   #6
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Concrete Piers for Deck - FAIL (help)


The contractor's claim about the concrete is bizarre. Concrete can be placed in hot weather, cold weather, wet weather, dry weather, can even be placed at 30 degrees below zero if properly insulated and the correct mix is used. Concrete typically cures well enough within two weeks to withstand frost. There must have been something horrendously wrong with the mix or the placement technique to cause severe failure as you describe so quickly. I would see if you can find out exactly what happened, you don't want that contractor or that mix at your place again.
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Old 08-15-2012, 09:53 PM   #7
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Concrete Piers for Deck - FAIL (help)


Daniel is correct.

Either a bad job of making the concrete with poor materials and proportions of really bad construction practices.

For something to go bad 12" or 18" deep, it means the ground was deeply frozen or the job was not protected after pouring because it takes a long time for the freezing to take place in concrete since the concrete actually generates heat as it cured.

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Old 08-15-2012, 10:35 PM   #8
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Concrete Piers for Deck - FAIL (help)


I wonder how wet he poured the concrete. If it was so wet the aggregates were separating and falling to the bottom, it would be an inconsistent mix. That could cause the problem, but then again, I'm just sorta thinking out loud.

I wouldn't worry about the epoxy curing first, since it isn't going to be where the fresh concrete is, anyway.
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Old 08-16-2012, 08:47 AM   #9
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Concrete Piers for Deck - FAIL (help)


Yea that's just plain goofy, something got left out of that mix (or something got added, like excessive water). I would say that the entire pier should be replaced, not just the top half.

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