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Old 06-26-2010, 10:53 PM   #16
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I'll try to keep it civil & simply say that I'm not impressed.......





BUT, I do appreciate looking at the pics.

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Old 06-26-2010, 10:56 PM   #17
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The story unfolds.

I did not do Google Earth for the exact location. The 6" block should wave been a tip-off since they are also common in Central and South America and I just followed my initial thoughts. - The kid doing the plaster would be a high paid finished by the time he gets to the U.S. if the decided to move.

The fishing lines are proven historic method to make sure that the wall is plumb (absolutely necessary for building strength). Unless I am wrong, the floor between the lower and upper floor is a concrete slab poured on the top of the external walls, so the external walls do carry some load and provide rigidity for the structure. If it is a 2-way slab, there could be even more load on the exterior walls, but there is sufficient strength in the reinforced piers outside the openings. If there was a hurricane, I would automatically go the the first floor to survive and let the temporary roof go away temporarily.

It is built adequately for the conditions and weather extremes and finished requirement for a long lasting structure until progress requires them to go a little higher.

Thanks for the exposure to what you saw.

Dick

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Old 06-27-2010, 03:10 AM   #18
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Hello Dick

almost all the 2 story homes have a pour concrete floor here.
In this case the builder is using a steel joist and a plywood floor
I'll send some pics of the joist system
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Old 06-27-2010, 06:55 AM   #19
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Houses are built this way throughout the Caribbean. I built my home in Trinidad using this technique and in many ways, it is stronger than my stick built US home. Using concrete bricks as you see are not load bearing and there is no issue with them during earthquakes.

Code in the Caribbean allows you to put electrical on the wall vs in the wall. Likewise, you dont have to worry about other concerns such as insulation and condensation.
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Old 06-27-2010, 11:31 AM   #20
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All the voltage is 200 volts 2 wire no ground 30amp per house
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Old 09-13-2011, 06:08 AM   #21
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I've been looking into AAC for the past couple of years and don't understand why it isn't more widely used in construction in the US. It is used around the world but not too often here. Do you have any insights for me?
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Old 09-13-2011, 10:55 AM   #22
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Hello Marblepavers(cool name,hehe),
In answer to your question...I have no idea,but maybe it comes down to cost of labor?

The blocks you see in the photos are made by hand,most are hand mixed on the ground and than shoveled into a slip form,when just sun dried the form is removed and the block cures the rest of the way in the shade.when dry if you step on a block it will crumble form the weight!each block sells for about 30 cents.
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Old 09-13-2011, 02:08 PM   #23
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marblepavers -

Most of the block in the Philippine islands are made on concrete block machines to keep up with the demands and get the most out of the locally available aggregates and build buildings that have survived the cyclones for decades and be be restored to normality easily and cheaply soon after a hit. They have learned through experience that the best wood frame construction is not adequate. In many areas there is not enough demand for the more precise products, so hand made block are made using crude methods to produce a block that is adequate for the purpose. They construction is done to withstand the disaster loads from storms and create a strong structure that can be finished easily using fine finishes by local craftsmen/laborers.

The efficient and sound use of light reinforcement creates a very good structure.

Just look at the proven records of being used in the Caribbean that is hit with hurricanes frequently and rebound quickly while wood construction just does not work in the long term.

Marbledust -

AAC is an old European material (about 60 years old) that has fallen on its face because of durability, low strength and lack of flexibility and not having cores. Under the socialized governments, it was a subsidized product that required large amounts of energy and often the plants were adjacent to public power plants. Because of this, it was a recommended type of construction that created the use of it. I was in an AAC plant in Poland and I was going to see the ball mill for grinding silica sand and they wanted to take me there. - I said "I can find my way because I have been in many AAC plants is other countries.

In the U.S., the production cost of AAC is much higher and construction methods never did get established in one of the very few countries where wood is used in construction. The U.S. builds for short term building life and the "green" folk have not realized the wood is not really recyclable, but short term new growth can be cut again until.

Dick
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Old 09-13-2011, 03:23 PM   #24
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AAC blocks are still really popular in the UK. They are light, easy to cut and easy to lay. They also have good thermal qualities.
The main disadvantage is they they tend to suffer more from shrinkage cracking than concrete blocks.
Here's an example of cracking even before they have been plastered.
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Old 09-14-2011, 09:07 AM   #25
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I am in commercial construction and work mostly with steel and concret and CMU block, I would not live in one of those houses. I bet there are no building codes to fallow and no type of inspections and No engineers involved. The skilled trade there wouldn't make a good laborer here. I have been to Brazil and seen the construction there and to Iraq and Kuwait, it is pretty shoddy construction. But that is just my opinion
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Old 09-14-2011, 09:27 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
marblepavers -

Most of the block in the Philippine islands are made on concrete block machines to keep up with the demands and get the most out of the locally available aggregates and build buildings that have survived the cyclones for decades and be be restored to normality easily and cheaply soon after a hit. They have learned through experience that the best wood frame construction is not adequate. In many areas there is not enough demand for the more precise products, so hand made block are made using crude methods to produce a block that is adequate for the purpose. They construction is done to withstand the disaster loads from storms and create a strong structure that can be finished easily using fine finishes by local craftsmen/laborers.

The efficient and sound use of light reinforcement creates a very good structure.

Just look at the proven records of being used in the Caribbean that is hit with hurricanes frequently and rebound quickly while wood construction just does not work in the long term.

Marbledust -

AAC is an old European material (about 60 years old) that has fallen on its face because of durability, low strength and lack of flexibility and not having cores. Under the socialized governments, it was a subsidized product that required large amounts of energy and often the plants were adjacent to public power plants. Because of this, it was a recommended type of construction that created the use of it. I was in an AAC plant in Poland and I was going to see the ball mill for grinding silica sand and they wanted to take me there. - I said "I can find my way because I have been in many AAC plants is other countries.

In the U.S., the production cost of AAC is much higher and construction methods never did get established in one of the very few countries where wood is used in construction. The U.S. builds for short term building life and the "green" folk have not realized the wood is not really recyclable, but short term new growth can be cut again until.

Dick
When I look around I see block being made in the front yards of peoples homes.some of the block makers have some fancy machine or two,but most use a hand packed mould.
lumber in the phils consist mostly of coco wood.plywood is imported and cost alot.
the roof structures are made with steel and covered with corrugated sheet metal.
I do beleve that the wood home here in america is pretty strong and offers more in terms of cost savings and design features.
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Old 09-14-2011, 10:00 AM   #27
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I agree with the use on CMU to build with, just higher quality than I am seeing in some of these pictures. When i can afford to build to my standards it will be with lots of heavily reiforced concrete and steel, probably metal studs and heavy steel for load bearing structure and a rebar haeavy poured basement with bar joist for 1st floor and concrete.
Expensive, yes, built to last yes, it will be my last house.

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