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Old 06-08-2008, 10:57 PM   #1
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Compressed air piping for basement woodshop


Hey-

So, I want to install some piping to carry compressed air to three different outlets in my basement shop. The compressor will be somewhat remote in order to minimize noise so I'll need to run some piping to the shop area. Should I use simple black iron pipe for this? I know that there will be an issue with moisture and I plan on installing some drains outfitted with ball valves at the bottoms of the vertical drops. Someone mentioned galvanized pipe but I thought that with that type of material, the galvanizing is only applied to the exterior which would be meaningless.

Any ideas?

Tx,
Jimmy

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Old 06-09-2008, 08:20 AM   #2
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Compressed air piping for basement woodshop


Black iron pipe was used in all the shops I worked at. If you are going to use just one port at a time, I'd run all 1/2". Drain valves on the drip legs is a good idea. I run 120 psig on all of my air tools. Possible additions may be pressure regulators/ driers (if you plan to spray...) or automatic oilers. Shut off valves were also used on each branch line. Being a home shop and with the compressor located in a nearby room, I'd consider one in a central location in case of an air hose rupture.

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Old 06-09-2008, 12:03 PM   #3
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Compressed air piping for basement woodshop


Just how far away from your shop will your copressor be
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Old 06-09-2008, 12:13 PM   #4
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Compressed air piping for basement woodshop


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Just how far away from your shop will your copressor be
About 45-50'
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Old 06-09-2008, 12:34 PM   #5
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Compressed air piping for basement woodshop


OK well mine is not that far only about 30 feet but I ran the black pipe to the nearest wall.Then came through the wall to a manifold system where I could hook up 4 lines and run that heavy black hose from each to different places.Each has its own shut off and I have an auto oiler and a dryer at the compressor.This gave me a little more flexibility as to where I need a line and cut cost a little since I had some hose and found the rest at a good sale price.Another factor was both HD and Lowe's are just down the street and both cut and thread the pipe at no charge
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Old 06-09-2008, 12:40 PM   #6
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Compressed air piping for basement woodshop


Quote:
Originally Posted by clasact View Post
OK well mine is not that far only about 30 feet but I ran the black pipe to the nearest wall.Then came through the wall to a manifold system where I could hook up 4 lines and run that heavy black hose from each to different places.Each has its own shut off and I have an auto oiler and a dryer at the compressor.This gave me a little more flexibility as to where I need a line and cut cost a little since I had some hose and found the rest at a good sale price.Another factor was both HD and Lowe's are just down the street and both cut and thread the pipe at no charge
Sounds good. I'm going to run the pipe all the way to the work area and incidentally, 45 is the farthest point; there will be a couple of other outlets that will be closer. So far, I'm not anticipating doing any spraying so I'll probably hold off on the dryer. I am however installing regulators at each quik-connect location and I may go with combo reg/oilers. On the other hand, maybe it would be cheaper just to use a single oiler at the compressor?

Thanks,
Jimmy
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Old 06-09-2008, 10:43 PM   #7
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Compressed air piping for basement woodshop


Automatic oilers, especially the mist type, work much better when they're as close to the tool as possible. The oil tends to stick to the inside of the pipe/hose, and gets to the tool in globs instead of a fine mist. If the oil mixes with water, it'll make a gooey mess.

If you can, slope the line somewhat, sloping away from the compressor is best. The pipe will act as a sort of cooler, and water vapor will condense inside of it as it cools. If it's sloped away from the compressor, the liquid will flow with the air, and can be drained out the end occasionally. When you install tees in the line, aim the tap upward, put a 3" or 4" nipple pointing up, then a 90 to get horizontal, then another 90 to aim down. the reason being that any liquid in the pipe will flow into the tool if the tee is pointed downward. If the tee points up, the liquid will stay in the trunk line, and can be drained out at the low point. Put a drain valve at each low point, if there's more than one.

Regulators at each point of use are a good idea. They tend to leak occasionally, so I'd put a ball valve in front of each one. I'd also arrange the system so that if a regulator needed to be replaced (they will!) it can be unscrewed without having to unstrap the pipe from the wall. I usually don't use the combo units, I usually put a tee between the regulator and the oiler, sometimes you'll need oiled air, and sometimes dry, though some of the combo units have a dry air tap. I also try to put a pressure gauge somewhere in the main (unregulated) line.

The quick-connects are one of the best inventions ever! They work equally well on dry air and oiled air. You'll need to strap the pipe to the wall securely, they take some force to connect under pressure. I try to aim the quick-connects downward at a 45 angle, it puts less stress on the hose.

It sounds like you'll have a pretty good system when you get done.

Rob
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Old 06-10-2008, 12:10 AM   #8
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Compressed air piping for basement woodshop


Quote:
Originally Posted by micromind View Post
Automatic oilers, especially the mist type, work much better when they're as close to the tool as possible. The oil tends to stick to the inside of the pipe/hose, and gets to the tool in globs instead of a fine mist. If the oil mixes with water, it'll make a gooey mess.

If you can, slope the line somewhat, sloping away from the compressor is best. The pipe will act as a sort of cooler, and water vapor will condense inside of it as it cools. If it's sloped away from the compressor, the liquid will flow with the air, and can be drained out the end occasionally. When you install tees in the line, aim the tap upward, put a 3" or 4" nipple pointing up, then a 90 to get horizontal, then another 90 to aim down. the reason being that any liquid in the pipe will flow into the tool if the tee is pointed downward. If the tee points up, the liquid will stay in the trunk line, and can be drained out at the low point. Put a drain valve at each low point, if there's more than one.

Regulators at each point of use are a good idea. They tend to leak occasionally, so I'd put a ball valve in front of each one. I'd also arrange the system so that if a regulator needed to be replaced (they will!) it can be unscrewed without having to unstrap the pipe from the wall. I usually don't use the combo units, I usually put a tee between the regulator and the oiler, sometimes you'll need oiled air, and sometimes dry, though some of the combo units have a dry air tap. I also try to put a pressure gauge somewhere in the main (unregulated) line.

The quick-connects are one of the best inventions ever! They work equally well on dry air and oiled air. You'll need to strap the pipe to the wall securely, they take some force to connect under pressure. I try to aim the quick-connects downward at a 45 angle, it puts less stress on the hose.

It sounds like you'll have a pretty good system when you get done.

Rob
Rob-

You are a true master. I always appreciate your words!

Jimmy

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