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Iconoclast 07-27-2011 05:23 AM

Changing Roof Type
 
Just curious if anyone has advice on changing a roof type.

I have a regular hip-gable roof on a traditional house. I'm changing my mid-century traditional house to a mid-century modern home. As part of the remodel, I'm changing this typical hip-gabled roof to a butterfly roof.

in doing this, anything I should look out for? I know what is involved but just curious if I've forgotten anything to anticipate before we get to that phase of our project.

Thanks!

tcleve4911 07-27-2011 05:27 AM

Watch the weather closely
Have plenty of tarps
Prebuild as much as you can before you tear out the existing.

Good luck.

kwikfishron 07-27-2011 05:39 AM

That’s a pretty radical change. I hope you live in a dry climate.

There is probably no other roof style that's more prone to leaks.

The roofing will be the most critical detail of you project.

Iconoclast 07-27-2011 06:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron
That’s a pretty radical change. I hope you live in a dry climate.

There is probably no other roof style that's more prone to leaks.

The roofing will be the most critical detail of you project.

I live in Dallas, Tx.

Why do you consider it to be so prone to leaks? Because of the valley in the center where the water collects? There will be a rain catchment system that that water will funnel into. Other than that i am not sure why it is more prone to leaks anymore than a typical roof.

kwikfishron 07-27-2011 07:20 AM

With a typical roof system the idea is to shed the roof water away from the house. A butterfly roof sheds the water to the middle of the house.

Iím not saying this will be a problem for you but extra attention needs to be paid to the roofing details. A mistake there could cause you some real problems.

You asked what you should look out for and Iíd put that up high on the list.

stuart45 07-27-2011 07:32 AM

Butterfly roofs were popular here in Victorian times, but are quite rare now. My daughter has one on her row house, and although it's OK now you can see where it has leaked badly in the past by the staining on the brick party walls in the loft.
A common problem was slight leaks developing in the lead gutters and causing rot in the beams below, which in turn caused the gutter to drop and leak more.
As kwikfishron said the design is taking water to the centre of the building and any slight leak in the gutter will send down a lot of water.

Iconoclast 07-27-2011 07:48 AM

Thanks for the feedback.

I dont think it will be an issue as long as i use a knowledgable contractor who knows how to seal it properly and drain it adequately. Its perfectly possible to have a butterfly roof without it leaking i am sure it just requires a good design.

I have never seen a Victorian with a butterfly roof. What part of the country are you in? The werent invented until 1933 and are traditionally on mid century or contemporary homes.

shazapple 07-27-2011 08:07 AM

I guess you could say some of the older buildings around here have a 'butterfly roof', although the pitch is much lower and certainly not used as a design element.

I agree with others, you're creating a maintenance item with this kind of roof. Still, I'd be interested in seeing the transition, please keep us updated!

stuart45 07-28-2011 08:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iconoclast (Post 694604)
Thanks for the feedback.

I dont think it will be an issue as long as i use a knowledgable contractor who knows how to seal it properly and drain it adequately. Its perfectly possible to have a butterfly roof without it leaking i am sure it just requires a good design.
It shouldn't leak when it first done. It's just more of a problem after a number of years.

I have never seen a Victorian with a butterfly roof. What part of the country are you in? The werent invented until 1933 and are traditionally on mid century or contemporary homes.
They were around in London a long time before that.
http://www.urban75.net/vbulletin/arc.../t-127135.html

Properly built it will last well, it's only when they go wrong the problems are usually worse than with a standard roof.

Iconoclast 07-28-2011 05:08 PM

Ah, you're in England. They weren't here in the US until 1933.

And I am aware that it would be a few years before it would leak, but my point is that if it is designed correctly there there shouldn't be an issue. Also, the valley is above a part of the house that isn't exposed to furnishings or anything so if it does leak it wouldn't be a huge disaster.

kwikfishron 07-28-2011 05:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iconoclast (Post 695717)
And I am aware that it would be a few years before it would leak, but my point is that if it is designed correctly there there shouldn't be an issue. Also, the valley is above a part of the house that isn't exposed to furnishings or anything so if it does leak it wouldn't be a huge disaster.


Rotting structural members and mold are just two issues that can be going on even before you notice the leak.

But at least the furniture isnít getting wet.:thumbsup:

Iconoclast 07-28-2011 05:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 695762)
Rotting structural members and mold are just two issues that can be going on even before you notice the leak.

But at least the furniture isnít getting wet.:thumbsup:

It is directly above a channel that will be protected with steel. Underneath it is a huge rainwater catchment tank so if it goes anywhere it will be into the tank, not the house. No longer worried about it. I was, but after hearing everyone's concerns they aren't concerns since it's been designed appropriately and with failsafes.

Thanks for your input.

kwikfishron 07-28-2011 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iconoclast (Post 695773)
It is directly above a channel that will be protected with steel. Underneath it is a huge rainwater catchment tank so if it goes anywhere it will be into the tank, not the house. No longer worried about it. I was, but after hearing everyone's concerns they aren't concerns since it's been designed appropriately and with failsafes.

Thanks for your input.

Alrighty then, my work is done here.

Beam me up Scottie. :sailor:

WillK 07-29-2011 11:15 AM

Do you have a plan for how this area of the roof will be ventilated?


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