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Old 04-16-2013, 07:28 PM   #1
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I am building a fence around my arena and put 100 by 6" sona tubes down 4 feet. While the cement set I put in veranda 4 x 4 holders and screwed 4 x 4 posts into them. Well the first wind storm this winter my fence blew over and ripped and broke the veranda holders. I have tried 4 times to reset the posts but now the veranda holders are ripping the stud out of the cup.
My question is: If I get some 10" sona tubes and put them over the 6" that is there will the posts stand up to weather and also bond to the cement that is already there? I am into this fence for serious money and need a fence for the arena.
If there are suggestions about how to repair my fence I really need them.
Uther.

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Old 04-16-2013, 07:43 PM   #2
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My goodness? What kind of wind are you getting?

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Old 04-16-2013, 07:43 PM   #3
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Ok so what's a veranda holder?
Got a picture of this fence.
If your talking about those cheap vinyl fences that Lowes sells under the Veranda name good luck trying to keep those brackets from snapping off.
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Old 04-16-2013, 07:49 PM   #4
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Veranda post holders are u shaped with a ribbed spike that is set in the cement. The ones I used are for 4 x 4's and the steel is 10 gage galvanized. I cannot use most of them as the spike is pulled right out of the u piece.
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Old 04-16-2013, 07:52 PM   #5
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The wind was from the north and about 80 kms/hr and blew for 2 days. I managed to erect the fence but the next storm was worse and most holders are broken and useless.
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:01 PM   #6
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I hate to tell you, but I think you have 100 sono tubes that are useless in the ground. I'm not sure who recommended to you to use post brackets, but they're not the right way to build a fence IMO. You should have sunk the fence posts directly in the ground, surrounded by gravel, or augered bigger holes and poured the concrete around the posts.

Short of drilling deep holes into the top of the existing concrete piers, having massive "retro-fit" post holders manufactured at a local steel shop, and expoxying them into the drilled holes, I think starting over with new holes is your only option........
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:01 PM   #7
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Still can not picture how anything like that would hold up a fence.
I would have just set the 4 X 4's in concrete.
Do they work something like this?
http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...rs/LCB-CB.asp#
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:08 PM   #8
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Yes that is what they are like only instead of a bracket that goes into the cement they have a ribbed spike.
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:09 PM   #9
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I have been thinking the same thing, not being able to repair what I have done. CRAP.
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:22 PM   #10
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certainly be nice if you could take that *** back to whoever recommended it,,, just wondering - was their corp color blue or ORANGE ? ? knowing/understanding wind loads & how to calculate them would probably be helpful, too !

ARENA.....,hhhmmmmmmm,,,,,,,,,,, horse or hockey ? most horse fences are rail & a normal strong wind wouldn't bother them much,,, hockey arena'd be different, of course might help IF you post'd your location as joe noted,,, usually helps those who respond to be more relevant im-n-s-h-fo

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Old 04-16-2013, 08:27 PM   #11
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I live in Eastern Canada and the soil is mostly clay. about 30 feet deep. The arena is for horses and I had 4 x 4 posts down 4 feet but they were rotting so this solution was brought up and it sounded good on paper. Easy to replace the wooden posts and the 1 x 6 rails this way.
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Old 04-16-2013, 09:16 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uther
I live in Eastern Canada and the soil is mostly clay. about 30 feet deep. The arena is for horses and I had 4 x 4 posts down 4 feet but they were rotting so this solution was brought up and it sounded good on paper. Easy to replace the wooden posts and the 1 x 6 rails this way.
I have a six foot cedar fence that used to snap the four by four posts whenever there were strong sustained winds, usually over 50mph. After the insurance company paid for the first repair, the fence installers replaced the posts with four by fours sunk three feet in concrete, same as before, but this time they added a piece of angle iron nailed to each post which also was embedded in the concrete. That was in the mid eighties and all of these reinforced posts are still standing to this day. This would probably be a solution that would solve your problem but you'd have to sink all new posts again, but this time with angle iron reinforcements already attached.
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Last edited by Dave Sal; 04-17-2013 at 03:52 PM.
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