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Old 12-29-2007, 05:06 PM   #1
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Ceiling Drywall Repair Question


I am going to be cutting a hole in my popcorn ceiling to repair a leaking pipe. My question is, what is the best way to repair the hole in the sheetrock? I know that it is best to cut the hole with joists on the sides in order to have a place to attach the cutout piece back to. The problem is that the area that I need to cut the hole out of the ceiling is not in a "joist area" to allow me access to the pipe. What suggestons does anyone have on having to repair the sheetrock? Thanks !
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Old 12-29-2007, 05:42 PM   #2
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Ceiling Drywall Repair Question


You do not need to do that. The best way is to cut the hole square. Then cut a piece of sheetrock the same size. next take some scrap wood and screw it to the top of the existing sheetrock so half of it is sticking out into the hole. Next take the piece and place it in the hole (It would be good idea to use some liquid nails for sheetrock for added strenth) and screw this to the wood. Then just tape, spackle, sand, prime, paint.
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Old 12-29-2007, 07:51 PM   #3
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Ceiling Drywall Repair Question


USP45 is absolutely right about the method of patching such a hole. We have patcched such holes this way, literally thousands of times. Even this week, our drywall workers are doing repairs in 30 apartments damaged by ice dams, using the same methods....

As far as the popcorn surface: Scrape down the surrounding area of the hole before taping and coating. Then do the drywall patch and taping as normal. Key Point is: Get the edges of your coats smooth. Then when you spray it, the patch won't show.

When you spray it (the patch): Spray in a grid pattern (2 directions = grid).
Feather out the spray as you leave the patched area.

There is no guarantee that you will be able to match the popcorn spray perfectly.
I will say that there are actually different types of popcorn spray; medium, fine, extra fine. The difference is in the size of the popcorn "balls". So you would need to figure that out and match it.

Tip: Do test sprays on scrap sheetrock BEFORE you attempt the ceiling patch...

Good Luck!
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Old 12-29-2007, 08:04 PM   #4
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Ceiling Drywall Repair Question


There is another method I used to do in my younger day. That was to cut the hole square, then cut a patch 3 inches longer and wider than the hole. next I would remove 1-1/2" off all 4 sides on the back leaving just the front paper left attatched to the patch. next I would remove 1-1/2" of the outer paper on all 4 sides of the hole to be fixed. next I would butter up all 4 sides of the patch making sure that the mud was on the edges of the patch and some on the 1-1/2" paper. next I would insert the patch and using a blade spread out the mud. This is just using the original drywall paper as the tape is all. When it dries, it stays. I dont do it that way anymore as its too time consuming.
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Old 12-30-2007, 08:50 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by USP45 View Post
There is another method I used to do in my younger day. That was to cut the hole square, then cut a patch 3 inches longer and wider than the hole. next I would remove 1-1/2" off all 4 sides on the back leaving just the front paper left attatched to the patch. next I would remove 1-1/2" of the outer paper on all 4 sides of the hole to be fixed. next I would butter up all 4 sides of the patch making sure that the mud was on the edges of the patch and some on the 1-1/2" paper. next I would insert the patch and using a blade spread out the mud. This is just using the original drywall paper as the tape is all. When it dries, it stays. I dont do it that way anymore as its too time consuming.
We still use that method on walls, but we prefer not to use it when patching ceilings = we feel it increases the possibilty of that type of patch being a more visible repair...

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 12-30-2007 at 08:52 AM.
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Old 12-30-2007, 09:03 AM   #6
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Ceiling Drywall Repair Question


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We still use that method on walls, but we prefer not to use it when patching ceilings = we feel it increases the possibilty of that type of patch being a more visible repair...
Is this a Texas patch? Question coming from a Canadian
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Old 12-30-2007, 09:18 AM   #7
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Is this a Texas patch? Question coming from a Canadian
Actually many old timers preferred this method as it bonds the old drywall to the new via the mud. It is actually quite strong and if done right leaves no bump in the wall where the tape lays. The more conventional method creates a bump because of the tape, thats why some of the existing paper is removed so it sets flush. I still use this method on "High End" repairs as people who pay big bucks to have work done seem to have a keener eye for flaws, and trust me, some wise a** doctor who does not know which end of a hammer to drive a nail with will spot a scratch in the darkest spot of a 10 foot high wall that you would need a magnifier to see!
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