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-   -   Can I remove this wall..? (Image) (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/can-i-remove-wall-image-102551/)

findlay70 04-24-2011 08:17 AM

Can I remove this wall..? (Image)
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hello,
We wish to remove a wall in the house to add more space to our kitchen. The wall currently creates a passageway which is also a waste of space - here are comments on this-
1. In the crawlspace, there is nothing below the wall - no supporting structure. The support is on the opposite wall (steel beam) with a steel pipe into the ground. This wall is also the same main wall upstairs.
2. The wall itself has regular joists, but the one corner on the column has 3 joists/2 by fours nailed together.
3. The column has a HVAC exhaust running up inside. Not sure if I can move this to another location. The solution (if it cannot be rerouted) is to purchase a more asthetically pleasing column (a round column) and have the exhaust run within that. If the wall in NOT load bearing, I can have the column split and joined around the hvac exaust. If the wall IS load-bearing, then I will have to either move the HVAC exhaust or try and feed the exhaust through a load-bearing column.
4. The wall contains a hvac OUT vent (push air) which feeds upstairs. This is tricky - if I move it to the opposite wall I will have to run it up the opposite wall and through the ceiling to match up with the existing flow upstairs.

I have attached two photos. These show the wall structure from front and passage angles. I can send more photos if needed.
Any assistance with be greatly appreciated...
thanks
Andy

tcleve4911 04-24-2011 09:13 AM

Not sure the question.

Can you remove it?
Sure
Any opening can be properly supported and designed to carry loads from above.
Usually the variable is budget.

If you are really really serious about having this done, start removing the wall coverings and see what's actually behind there.

Then you (& we) can make better decisions of how to go about it.

ps.......... look at your pics before you post them...my neck hurts....:laughing:

findlay70 04-24-2011 09:45 AM

Thanks for the fast response.
I changed the orientation of the images... (Sorry).
I think the best option here is to leave the existing column but remove the wall. I will remove more drywall this morning and provide feedback...
thanks..!!!
Andy

Ron6519 04-24-2011 10:43 AM

Do the ceiling joists above this wall, rest on the wall(perpendicular to it) Or are the joists parallel to it?
A non loadbearing wall is easier to deal with.
Ron

findlay70 04-24-2011 12:46 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 635533)
Do the ceiling joists above this wall, rest on the wall(perpendicular to it) Or are the joists parallel to it?
A non loadbearing wall is easier to deal with.
Ron

Guys - thanks all for your kind response to this.

Ron - that's a good point. I'll check this and get back to you. What I may do is insert a beam to the column which should support anything above it to be safe.

I've added more photos after doing more digging. The major issue I need to get around is moving the air intake and the air-output to the OPPOSITE side of the wall. I need to ask if this can be done - seems simple enough. The only issue I see is routing the OUTPUT up the opposite wall and along the ceiling to connect where it is now... perhaps I need to get a HVAC guy in..?
If I get the airflow managed, I can insert a beam at the top to the column and just take the wall down and leave the column.. I'm afraid to mess with the exhaust...

thanks again guys...

Jackofall1 04-24-2011 01:03 PM

Findlay, you keep mentioning exhaust, the point you are referring to is a return air and can simply be moved the adjacent wall or use a floor mount grill.

The fact the the wall form a hallway would lead me to believe that the supporting wall is actually the one next to the one you are asking to remove.

Is the wall next to the one in question in the center of the house? above the beam in the basement? if so, then that would be your supporting wall. As fas as moving the supply duct, you could open the ceiling up to access the area where it needs to be routed to and then patch it back once it is moved.

Are there any other gems in the wall like plumbing vent piping? electrical distribution. By the looks of it, it certainly would be worth removing that wall to open up your room.

Mark

Ron6519 04-24-2011 02:21 PM

With all the ductwork in the walls, I'd call in the HVAC guy to see what's possible. The ductwork needs to be rerouted in such a way as to not compromise air flow.
If this a load bearing wall, the area above it, from one side to the other needs to be clear of obstructions to get the header in place.
Ron

findlay70 04-27-2011 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackofall1 (Post 635612)
Findlay, you keep mentioning exhaust, the point you are referring to is a return air and can simply be moved the adjacent wall or use a floor mount grill.

The fact the the wall form a hallway would lead me to believe that the supporting wall is actually the one next to the one you are asking to remove.

Is the wall next to the one in question in the center of the house? above the beam in the basement? if so, then that would be your supporting wall. As fas as moving the supply duct, you could open the ceiling up to access the area where it needs to be routed to and then patch it back once it is moved.

Are there any other gems in the wall like plumbing vent piping? electrical distribution. By the looks of it, it certainly would be worth removing that wall to open up your room.

Mark

Hello Mark - thanks VERY MUCH for your response. Thanks aslo for agreeing that removing this wall would be worth it - i'll show this post to my wife...:)
(she is nervous about my handyman work...)

The "exhaust" is the output from the furnace and gets HOT. It goes up through to the roof. That's why I'm sure it is not returning air. There is, however, another vent which is returning - this one I can reroute.

Yes, the opposite wall has (in the basement) a big steel gurder/beam which is supported by a 6 inch pipe which runs into the earth. There is NOTHING below the the wall I wish to remove. I have made holes in the drywall and looked in between the studs and there is nothing else apart from a few electrics (third switches) which I dont need.

The only issue that is in my way now is the heat pipe UP TO the upper level of the house. I spent some time in Home Depot talking to some HVAC guy and he said that for every 90 degree turn you lose 50% air capacity/force. I'm getting some HVAC guys in this week to see what they can do to re-route this in an efficient way...

The first prize for me would be to completely remove the wall up to the ceiling and put a column around the air exhaust. Im still very nervous about the support of the way and am considering getting a structural engineer in to qualify that this wall is removable.

If I cannot do this, i will insert a beam into the wall just below the ceiling level and then leave part of the existing column on the main wall side to support it. I'll then build a column around the remaining column and moud that to the beam. May not look like the first option, but will be better than having this wasted space...

I will get back to you once I have had feedback from the HVAC guys...
Cheers..!

findlay70 04-27-2011 05:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 635643)
With all the ductwork in the walls, I'd call in the HVAC guy to see what's possible. The ductwork needs to be rerouted in such a way as to not compromise air flow.
If this a load bearing wall, the area above it, from one side to the other needs to be clear of obstructions to get the header in place.
Ron

Thanks Ron.
HVAC guys comes in tomorrow. I'll know more then...
If I remove the obstructions, I may just insert a header anyway just for peace of mind...
Thanks


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