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-   -   Can I remove this? bricks above beam (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/can-i-remove-bricks-above-beam-181063/)

Rekonn 06-01-2013 03:15 PM

Can I remove this? bricks above beam
 
In my basement ceiling, but only above the support beams, I have what looks like grey bricks mortared in between the joists. What function do they serve? Can I take them out? I'd like to eventually run new pipes and wiring through there.

http://imageshack.us/a/img707/8515/b...ng31024x76.jpg

http://imageshack.us/a/img41/7431/ba...ng41024x76.jpg

Willie T 06-01-2013 03:40 PM

You sure that's mortar, and not foam?

Rekonn 06-01-2013 04:17 PM

Maybe plaster? I don't think it's foam. I can break a chunk off and crumble it further in my hands. I see home hair in it too.

Rekonn 06-01-2013 05:22 PM

Maybe it's for fireblocking? The ceiling was finished before I started taking it down.

oh'mike 06-02-2013 05:57 AM

Looks like fire blocking to me----rather old house? 1920s 1930s?

Rekonn 06-02-2013 09:35 AM

Wow, yes, built in 1928.

Rekonn 06-02-2013 10:02 AM

Ok, so the brick/plaster fireblock is necessary. But, I can knock it out, run some pipes/wires, and then put it back, right? I'm thinking just reuse the bricks, and then something else that'll do the job the plaster is doing now. I was initially thinking Great Stuff Fireblock foam, but the reviews on amazon are bad. Reviews say it burns just like regular foam, just colored orange. One review said it didn't pass inspection and he had to rip it out and replace with something called intumescent caulk. What do you guys recommend?

hand drive 06-02-2013 10:27 AM

fireblocking can be made from wood in some cases/most cases and then use the fire foam to fill around the perimeter of the fire blocking. in fact, fire block before pipes wires are run and you can cut the pipes/wires to fit in tight leaving less air spaces to fill later...

RWolff 06-02-2013 01:40 PM

Fireblocking, and it might also help the joists from twisting or otherwise moving, I would put them back if removed.

tony.g 06-02-2013 01:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hand drive (Post 1193274)
fireblocking can be made from wood in some cases/most cases

Yes; most people wrongly assume that timber is something you DON'T use for fire-stopping.
Used in a suitable thickness in a gap, the timber charrs in a fire, and this insulates it from the heat and prevents further degredation.
Where I live there are some old Victorian textile warehouses where the floors are of timber joists nailed side-by-side, so the whole floor is solid timber. These often survived in a fire.

Gary in WA 06-02-2013 08:47 PM

Remove and replace with solid wood per code; http://www.reedconstructiondata.com/...g-codes/maine/

IBC, note "other approved means" was not what you have for turn-over, lol; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...?bu2=undefined

Gary

Windows on Wash 06-03-2013 04:58 AM

Be sure to check that material for asbestos or use proper PPE. Given the age, there is a potential for that in that older material.

Duckweather 06-03-2013 08:49 AM

Are the photos from one side only, and is the other side the same? It looks like they are over a carrying beam. I agree it looks like fire stops, and wood works because it is intended to stop the airflow that will draw the fire up a wall, from a horizontal space into a vertical one, or vise-versa, slowing the progress of fire. Even the bricks will not work if the air spaces are not sealed

wkearney99 06-03-2013 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hand drive (Post 1193274)
fireblocking can be made from wood...

Sure, the idea isn't just to be fireproof, it's to delay the path of a fire long enough for people to get out and potentially limit the extent of the fire's damage.

Rekonn 06-04-2013 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Duckweather (Post 1194093)
Are the photos from one side only, and is the other side the same? It looks like they are over a carrying beam. I agree it looks like fire stops, and wood works because it is intended to stop the airflow that will draw the fire up a wall, from a horizontal space into a vertical one, or vise-versa, slowing the progress of fire. Even the bricks will not work if the air spaces are not sealed

I forget if the photos are from the same side, but it does look the same from both sides. And yes, they're over the carrying beam.


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