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-   -   Can I have some help building a shed?? :D (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/can-i-have-some-help-building-shed-d-146026/)

Lavid2002 06-05-2012 02:04 AM

Can I have some help building a shed?? :D
 
I am finishing a project now and I can't sit still! I have wanted to rip apart our old shed and replace it with a larger shed in the back yard. I would like to know how I can get started. Should I talk to carpenter friends and build my own schematics or work off pre designed blueprints?

Also, how do I get the proper permits from the city? I really don't care about permits and could totally get this project done without them because my neighbors are really cool, but I plan on being a duplex owner and landlord in the future, and would like to familiarize myself with the permit process.

Where do I start? I recognize that all the information needed for this is at my fingertips, and building a shed is not re inventing the wheel, but if someone could point me in the right direction I would greatly appreciate it!

Thanks Everyone

-Dave

joecaption 06-05-2012 09:05 AM

Since it sure sounds like you have never done this before you may want to start by buying a book on sheds. Any Lowes or HD will have them.
It will have some plans and the directions need to get you started.
To get a permit there going to want to see your plot plan so they can see where it's going to be sitting to make sure it's not to close to someone's property, not over or under any utility lines, or in a flood zone.
For a shed there pretty much just going to want to know the size, height, location of it.
No one here is going to be able to tell you what your local codes are exactly, some countys post them on line.
Do not try and cheap out on important things like the support under the shed, floor joist size, or subflooring thickness. You will regret it.
Make 100% sure it's far enough off the ground. Build it to close and it's going to rot out the siding.
Do not try and get around getting a permit, they can make you take it back down or at least fine you.
Building codes are there for a reason, not just to increace your taxes like some people think.

Windows 06-05-2012 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lavid2002 (Post 936620)
I am finishing a project now and I can't sit still! I have wanted to rip apart our old shed and replace it with a larger shed in the back yard. I would like to know how I can get started. Should I talk to carpenter friends and build my own schematics or work off pre designed blueprints?

Also, how do I get the proper permits from the city? I really don't care about permits and could totally get this project done without them because my neighbors are really cool, but I plan on being a duplex owner and landlord in the future, and would like to familiarize myself with the permit process.

Where do I start? I recognize that all the information needed for this is at my fingertips, and building a shed is not re inventing the wheel, but if someone could point me in the right direction I would greatly appreciate it!

Thanks Everyone

-Dave

In some areas, buildings under a specified square footage don't require a building permit. You would still need permits for electrical, etc. as appropriate and have to follow the setback guidelines and the established practices of responsible construction.

I would take a look at books about sheds to get some ideas on designs and function. Figure out how big you need it to be and where it will be sited in your yard. If you can find plans for exactly what you want you could work off of those, alter them to suit your liking, or draw plans from scratch with the help of your carpenter friends.

Constructing a shed is not rocket science but there is a deliberate process you have to follow to come up with an durable, attractive and conforming building.

Lavid2002 06-07-2012 01:26 AM

Alright, I went out and bought a book called Ortho's Home Improvement Encyclopedia. Great info on everything. Not incredibly specific about shed building but it gave me a good fundamental idea of the basics.

So far it seems as though the most important process, or the one I have the least experience with is the foundation. Should I go buy another book specific to sheds? I don't want to just lay the shed on the ground. The surrounding area has great drainage. Those individual pre poured concrete blocks that fit 2xs seem to work but they are certainly not aesthetically pleasing to the eye.


This method where dirt is pulled up and replaced with gravel then pressure treated lumber looks adequate and simple.
http://www.tigersheds.com/buildabase.asp

As does the cement paver solution.

joecaption 06-07-2012 05:47 AM

My biggest fear building the foundation like that would be what's called ponding.
In effect by digging the hole and filling with stone you have created a pond under the building for water to lay.
If you have sandy good draining soil it would be fine, but clay or in a low laying area it could be trouble.

Willie T 06-07-2012 07:32 AM

You already have good drainage there at the grass surface. Let it continue to do its job. Digging a pit directly beneath the shed will do little more than encourage all the rain falling around the edges of the shed to go beneath the shed. It may pond down there, it may not. But why create a feature that would have you taking the chance,,, one you do not have now?

jbs11 06-07-2012 09:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie T (Post 938196)
You already have good drainage there at the grass surface. Let it continue to do its job. Digging a pit directly beneath the shed will do little more than encourage all the rain falling around the edges of the shed to go beneath the shed. It may pond down there, it may not. But why create a feature that would have you taking the chance,,, one you do not have now?

The thinking is that you remove the top layer of soil which is primarily organic matter and will breakdown over time, thereby receding and possibly creating an unstable base. However, you bring up a good point and I have the same concern about ponding if I do this (I am planning a similar project)

Lavid2002 06-07-2012 11:01 AM

I live in southern NJ, and my soil is very sandy in the back yard. The old shed there has a rotted floor, but I think that is a result of putting regular lumber on the ground.

So what is a good idea here? Pressure treated lumber right on the ground? How about some cement pavers right on the ground? Perhaps digging holes and cementing pressure treated 4x4s in there?

drtbk4ever 06-07-2012 11:04 AM

How big a shed are you planning for? My apologies if I missed that somewhere.

Lavid2002 06-07-2012 11:08 AM

Let me go snap some pictures and make some measurements :)

That will help everyone.


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