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HUDSONVALLEYEXT 03-26-2007 09:33 PM

buying my first property
 
im buying my first property to build a house on. We are looking at a 3.4 acre lot we are located in southern NY. Some lots on the area are labeled as "board of health approved" and these lots are a lot more money. Does any one know what board of health approved means and is it possibly to get ripped off and buy land you can't build on?

AtlanticWBConst. 03-26-2007 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HUDSONVALLEYEXT (Post 38439)
im buying my first property to build a house on. We are looking at a 3.4 acre lot we are located in southern NY. Some lots on the area are labeled as "board of health approved" and these lots are a lot more money. Does any one know what board of health approved means and is it possibly to get ripped off and buy land you can't build on?

This could be related to the septic system....in other words you would need to supply the plans for an engineer designed septic system that meets the needs of your immediate Household ....and.... that is acceptable to the local town requirements....

http://www.ehow.com/how_12210_have-septic-system.html


This area is governed (overseen) by the local Board of health...and subject to it's review and approval.

HUDSONVALLEYEXT 03-26-2007 10:12 PM

that makes sense thanks

gary 03-27-2007 08:28 AM

Dear Hudson Valley,
A quick call to the county building code office can answer that for you, as well as your lawyer. It may be simply marketing by the realtor. In any event check it out before you buy, clear title, what has the land been used for(history), has a perk test been done ( amount of water absorbed by ground in a given time) also ask neighbors what kind of water do they have (sulphur) The perk test and drilled water with sulphur can be over come but to do so can be expensive in the short term and something you will have to take care of, so can be a long term expense. Land is expensive as you well know, so take what ever steps upfront to protect your investment, once you sign on dotted line you assume it all good and bad.
Gary

AtlanticWBConst. 03-27-2007 09:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gary (Post 38481)
Dear Hudson Valley,
A quick call to the county building code office can answer that for you, as well as your lawyer. It may be simply marketing by the realtor. In any event check it out before you buy, clear title, what has the land been used for(history), has a perk test been done ( amount of water absorbed by ground in a given time) also ask neighbors what kind of water do they have (sulphur) The perk test and drilled water with sulphur can be over come but to do so can be expensive in the short term and something you will have to take care of, so can be a long term expense. Land is expensive as you well know, so take what ever steps upfront to protect your investment, once you sign on dotted line you assume it all good and bad.
Gary


...Good advice...

Mike Swearingen 03-29-2007 01:19 PM

I never sell raw land (that doesn't have public water and sewer available) unless either the seller or buyer have secured permits for a septic sytem and/or a water well prior to closing. (I'm a 20-year NC real estate broker.)
I've seen too many parcels of land that would not perk for a septic permit due to bad soil (clay, etc.) located between two lots or existing homes that would perk.
Yes, there are some people that will sell you whatever you will buy for as much as you will pay, whether it perks or not, and guess who is stuck with it once you close.
Always inspect, inspect, inspect all land or homes that you buy before closing. Here in NC, Health Department septic permits are good for 60 months from date of inspection, and the septic systems are custom-designed for the specific soil located on that particular lot. I don't know what they cost up there, but a septic system "perk test" (actually a soil-type evaulation now) is $125 in this county, and another $50 for the permit if it passes. Money very well spent in advance whatever the cost.
Mike


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