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-   -   buying metal cross braces (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/buying-metal-cross-braces-52006/)

Lturgeon 08-30-2009 11:50 PM

buying metal cross braces
 
Hi all...I am new to this forum. I found the forum because I was searching for help in addressing a floor that has some bounce in it. In a lot of cases that I have read, the advice is to install more cross bracing. Our house used to have a reasonable amount of bracing until the HVAC and plumbing guys got into it, then a lot of the bracing was removed. I have seen people refer to metal cross braces for the joists, and have decided this is what I would like to try, but have never seen this type, only wooden ones. If someone would be so kind as to point me in the right direction as to where to purchase the metal cross braces, it would be greatly appreciated.

I live in Saskatchewan Canada in case anyone is wondering.

Thanks in advance;

Lyle Turgeon :)

Maintenance 6 08-31-2009 07:57 AM

The cross bracing you are referring to is called bridging. The metal straps go in before the subfloor is installed. The bottoms are then nailed after the flooring install. You won't be able to nail them to the tops of the joists in your case. Since you are trying to retro-fit, you may be better to cut solid blocking and nail it in. The blocks should be the same height as your floor joists and fit snug between them. Then toe nail them into place. Getting around ducts will be a problem, no matter what you choose.

Termite 08-31-2009 08:04 AM

M6 is 100% right. Can't install the metal ones without removal of the floor sheathing...Not practical. Your best bet is 1x4 bridging or solid blocking.

Lturgeon 08-31-2009 09:07 AM

Thanks for the quick responses. Here are the type I was hoping to find, since they can indeed be installed from the bottom of the joists even after the floor has been installed.

[IMG]file:///C:/Users/OURS/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot.png[/IMG][IMG]file:///C:/Users/OURS/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.png[/IMG]http://www.rd.com/smart-strategies-for-a-squeakproof-floor/article19310-1.html

I was hoping to be able to paste the actual photo here, but being new all I was able to do was enter the link.

Thanks again, and I'll explore my options.

Lyle Turgeon

Gary in WA 08-31-2009 12:23 PM

Simpson has these, I first used them about 30 years ago: http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...nca-tb-ltb.asp
Be safe, G

Lturgeon 08-31-2009 05:08 PM

Thank you GBR. Those are the ones I was interested in. Turns out after taking a closer look that I won't be able to use those either. My problem is that with our front-load clothes washer, the shaking of the spin cycle is shaking the surrounding area, and I want to strengthen the floors in an attempt to minimize the floor movement. I have decided to try to add 3/4 inch plywood to either side of the existing joists fastened with construction adhesive and screws. Since the furnace room is below the laundry room, and I don't plan on finishing the ceiling in the furnace room, I will "sister" the joists where I can, and use either plywood (3/4" by 9") to fasten on the bottoms of the joists to see if that helps make the floor more sturdy.

Lyle Turgeon

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBR in WA (Post 321779)
Simpson has these, I first used them about 30 years ago: http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...nca-tb-ltb.asp
Be safe, G


Gary in WA 08-31-2009 07:51 PM

You might want to put some solid rubber blocks under the feet to take most of the vibration. To strengthen the floor: http://www.finehomebuilding.com/PDF/Free/021184090.pdf

Be safe, G

Lturgeon 09-01-2009 10:24 AM

I have the solid rubber dampeners under the feet of the machine. I even went as far as fabricating a base of 3 layers of 3/4 inch plywood, glued and screwed together, to place under the washer and dryer previously (this was a different washing machine, which I gave to my son when he had his house built). He has the machine on concrete in the basement...it still sounds and shakes like a jet taking off, but it's not doing any damage there !! If what I'm doing now doesn't work, we'll try something else and keep on working at it. I had seen the link you posted previously GBR, and that's where I got the idea of using the plywood for sistering. Maybe front-load washers just aren't that friendly for second floor applications...

Thanks for the reply.
Lyle Turgeon

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBR in WA (Post 322043)
You might want to put some solid rubber blocks under the feet to take most of the vibration. To strengthen the floor: http://www.finehomebuilding.com/PDF/Free/021184090.pdf

Be safe, G


Gary in WA 09-01-2009 03:55 PM

Search the net for seismic absorbing qualities of building materials, or along that line. Maybe a smaller scale of earthquake-proofing buildings through rubber pillows or such. Apparently some brands of front loaders are quite violent, search them for solutions as well.
Be safe, G


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