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Old 10-22-2007, 09:28 AM   #1
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Butting drywall together not even.....


I have butted two drywall pieces together on the ceiling and they are not even, as the ceiling joists are not straight.

How would I deal with this when it comes to taping?
There is a sort of "hump" there at the seam.

Thanks

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Old 10-22-2007, 09:50 AM   #2
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Butting drywall together not even.....


a picture might help as could be many things going on

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Old 10-22-2007, 10:44 AM   #3
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Butting drywall together not even.....


Assuming that both of the edges have been secured to the joist(s), there may be a nail/screw head protruding down from joist that was overlooked when gutting the old ceiling, or possibly a loose knot, large sliver split off, debris from subfloor above etc.. At any rate, first hold a piece of 2" X 4" along the length of the misaligned seam, then hammer this board a few times to see if it will level off approximately flush to the other edge.
You'll most likely discover a bulge in the lower seam where the nature of problem originates. If it is a nail head, now protruding through the drywall edge, cut around this and remove it or hammer it below the finished face.
Next, run a screw on either side of the seam hole. Patch the hole with either "Rockhard" water putty to a peanut butter consistency, or a comparable 20 +- minute fast setting wall patch. Then tape and mud the joint as usual with fiberglass mesh.

IF there is no give to the seam after you hammer the 2" X 4" along it, then you can cut back the protruding edge at a slight angle, shaving off the sharp corner(tapering it) with a fresh utility blade/knife or a flat window razor using a slicing motion. Fiberglass mesh the joint, add the first layer of water putty("will not shrink") then build up and out with your joint compound until you have geathered out a wide 12" knife of joint "mud" compound.
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Old 10-22-2007, 10:58 AM   #4
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Butting drywall together not even.....


I assume you have no backing at the seam where the drywall met, otherwise you wouldn't have the problem you described...

you can add 2x1 plywood strips along the length of the seam, screw the strips to one piece before installing the other piece, then screw the other side once the other piece installed then the seam on both sides of the drywall will go up and down at the same time for both drywall... this will solve the seam uneven, but not solve you hump here or there because that is the other problem.... but really, I am not sure if this can be done by hand drive screwing because the plywood strips is kind of a bit loose than other solid backing, you need the steady rotation and strength of a cordless driver to drive in the screws, hand screwing may not work or difficult to make it work...

Last edited by KUIPORNG; 10-22-2007 at 11:07 AM.
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Old 10-22-2007, 04:37 PM   #5
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Butting drywall together not even.....


I have alread screwed the drywall in, so I really don't want to take it down.

Only a part of the seam is uneven, I would say about 4 inches, the rest of it butts up correctly.

If I shave it as suggested by remodel man, it has a screw where I need to shave it, so I would remove the screw, shave, and how would I put the screw back in if there is no paper to hold it, as I have shaved it to make it even.

If I build it up with the drywall compound, would that be ok?


Thanks
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Old 10-22-2007, 05:01 PM   #6
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Butting drywall together not even.....


you dont shave it... thats retarded. You fix the joist. If you shave it in the end you will only screw yourself. The joist most likely wasnt put in with that bad of a crown/hump in it, so it might move more and ruin your joint when it does.
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Old 10-22-2007, 11:57 PM   #7
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Butting drywall together not even.....


If the joist is inaccessable, as in this case and Yummy, does not wish to remove drywall, instead work with it as is. Therefor, I suggested "shaving" or filing it down with a surform to ease the transition, no less than half the thickness of the drywall, within reason = 1" + or - of the factory edge.
Surely, this will expose the screw, which might as well be removed and repositioned as close to the newly shaved edge as possible into the paper.
Before you reposition the screw, shoot some construction adhesive between the backer and the joist through the former screw hole. Next, you can support the shaved portion of the drywall by pinning it to the joist from below, with a simple horizontal 2"X 4" attached to a verticle 2"X 4" wedged or jacked, beneath the drywall. Let this sit over night. Then remove this support and fill with wall patch, let harden, then the mesh tape and several coats of compound. No big deal...
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Old 10-23-2007, 12:22 AM   #8
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Butting drywall together not even.....


The drywall joint compound, is used for the final coats 3/16th's thickness or less. If you attempt to apply joint compound in gaps, holes or voids that are deeper than this, you will need to add/build several layers because this joint compound shrinks severely, takes a minimumof 24 hours to dry and will crack.
It has minimal strength and considerably more shrinkage than the premium fillers like; water putty(Rock Hard), spackle, or the powdered fillers like "Sheetrock" Easy Sand 45 or 20 that you just add water.

I prefer to add about 20% of the powder to the premixed joint compound for the first coat into the mesh tape. This sets up faster and considerably stronger with less shrinkage.

Lastly, you can use the Zinnzer product called "Gardz", designed to seal the exposed gypsum from shaving or any porus surface before you paint.
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Old 10-23-2007, 09:27 AM   #9
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Butting drywall together not even.....


Looks like take the drywall down is much cleaner/easier/less time consuming/better then any of these fixes suggest above....if the uneven is not a lot... may be just for forget it as it is a basement only...

Last edited by KUIPORNG; 10-23-2007 at 09:37 AM.
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Old 10-23-2007, 09:43 AM   #10
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Butting drywall together not even.....


I agree with Kui****g, simply take down the drywall with a drywall lift and see what exactly is protruding. If it is a split or bowed joist, then you can power plane it smooth. Otherwise, you can remove the lowly nail or screw that plagues your progress. Although it seems like a painfull step backwards, this is inherent in the remodeling process. We all have unexpected hurdles during each sizeable project that tempers our determination to "Git er Done!"
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Old 10-23-2007, 09:53 AM   #11
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Butting drywall together not even.....


Thanks for all responses.

I did take the drywall down last night. I figured it was the best thing to do, even though I did not want to do that.

The problem was a ceiling joist that had, I don't know what it was, but looked like cement or some type of product that was interefering in my drywall butting even. I did not notice that before I put it up.

So I removed it and then put the drywall back up.

Now I feel much better. At least it is straight.
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Old 10-23-2007, 10:59 AM   #12
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Butting drywall together not even.....


Add a girl... glad to hear you make the right choice... I still have my mistake in the basement... a light switch is being hide behide one of the drywall... luckily that light is not useful... but I know this is not code compilance... one day at my retirement I might open it up to fix it... I understand when you are ready to hang the drywall... the joy always supress the caution of looking what's behind it....
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Old 10-23-2007, 12:40 PM   #13
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Butting drywall together not even.....


Thanks, K.

I'm glad I removed it, with my husband's help.

Next time, I will look more carefully.

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