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Old 11-07-2005, 10:37 PM   #1
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


I have always wanted to build a stone house with steel framing house in my hometown but the problem is that it is labeled a Earthquake-enviroment. It is located in Ukiah California and while it is about 115 MPH away from San Francisco it isn't directly under the San Andreas fault (and almost never has an Earthquake you can feel a little bit.

Is it still possible to build a stone house and steel fraiming house anyways in this region? I heard they receantly invented an elastic coating material that make stone or brick resistant to Earthquake damage like lighter non-stone/brick material. Is this true?

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Old 11-08-2005, 07:03 PM   #2
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


I'm not in a seismic region but know that the Mayans, Aztecs and a number of others have built in these regions with astonishing success. Getting their methods past B & Z & code inspectors would be a challange.

I'd rely on others for your info.

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Old 11-09-2005, 08:16 AM   #3
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverbackman
..It is located in Ukiah California and while it is about 115 MPH away from San Francisco
I've always thought of Ukiah as a place people move to slow down ther pace of life. "115 MPH" is much faster than I would have expected.

"People rushin' everywhere
If they'd only slow down once they might find something there
Green trees and timber land
People workin' with their hands
For sure, a different way to live."

Ukiah
The Doobie Brothers
from their 1973 album The Captain And Me (Jeff "Skunk" Baxter rocks!)
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Old 11-09-2005, 01:02 PM   #4
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


Quote:
Originally Posted by pipeguy
I've always thought of Ukiah as a place people move to slow down ther pace of life. "115 MPH" is much faster than I would have expected.

"People rushin' everywhere
If they'd only slow down once they might find something there
Green trees and timber land
People workin' with their hands
For sure, a different way to live."

Ukiah
The Doobie Brothers
from their 1973 album The Captain And Me (Jeff "Skunk" Baxter rocks!)
Ummm, I meant 115 miles. Want to give some advice?
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Old 11-09-2005, 05:43 PM   #5
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


Listen to The Captain And Me regularly
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Old 11-10-2005, 01:38 AM   #6
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


Quote:
Originally Posted by pipeguy
Listen to The Captain And Me regularly
:confused::confused:
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Old 11-22-2005, 02:56 AM   #7
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


Thanks Teetorbilt

No one else was of any help Anyone else on this forum know anything?
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Old 11-23-2005, 12:18 AM   #8
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


Why don't you ask one of the local building inspectors? They may know what contractors have used/done and what works and what doesn't. Just a thought.

Then again, so much is stucco out there, I don't know how any of it stays up. I used to live in Rancho Cucamonga, CA and went back to visit last year. They had built malls in places that I didn't even know there were places!

You're saying you want to build a stone house, but since you mention steel framing, I'm assuming you're meaning a stone veneer. Are you concerned for meeting building codes or just longevity?
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Old 11-26-2005, 09:08 PM   #9
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


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Why don't you ask one of the local building inspectors? They may know what contractors have used/done and what works and what doesn't. Just a thought.

Then again, so much is stucco out there, I don't know how any of it stays up. I used to live in Rancho Cucamonga, CA and went back to visit last year. They had built malls in places that I didn't even know there were places!

You're saying you want to build a stone house, but since you mention steel framing, I'm assuming you're meaning a stone veneer. Are you concerned for meeting building codes or just longevity?

Longevity I guess. Stone buildings by nature last longer and are much stronger than some temporary wood framed stucco house. Strength and longevity would be ideal I guess.

I don't need steel framing but I always read and heard it is much stronger. Basically I'm looking for the strongest material for both framing and building material. Stone seems to be the strongest. Actually I have also heard block concrete can be even stronger with steel framing inside so even that would be okay I guess.
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Old 11-27-2005, 12:13 AM   #10
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


Block walls inside will make it tough for plumbers and electricians. Steel framing would be plenty strong for me, for sure. It's flat and once you have drywall on both sides, it's very rigid. (if you use it, don't be scared if you see it installed and it seems kinda wobbly, that's normal until the drywall goes up.)

Have you considered poured concrete walls? I don't know off hand cost differences because I only purchase stone for veneer work (chimneys, siding) but if you throw in enough #7 rebar, your walls would probably be stronger than the stone and mortar method.
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Old 11-28-2005, 04:35 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by KenTheHandyMan
Block walls inside will make it tough for plumbers and electricians. Steel framing would be plenty strong for me, for sure. It's flat and once you have drywall on both sides, it's very rigid. (if you use it, don't be scared if you see it installed and it seems kinda wobbly, that's normal until the drywall goes up.)

Have you considered poured concrete walls? I don't know off hand cost differences because I only purchase stone for veneer work (chimneys, siding) but if you throw in enough #7 rebar, your walls would probably be stronger than the stone and mortar method.


Hmmm very very interesting. So a poured concrete wall house with steel framing is stronger than a stone wall-mortar house with steel framing?
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Old 11-28-2005, 09:57 PM   #12
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


All in all, it depends on the construction method. If you pour an 8 inch wall and put #5 rebar on 2' centers vertical, and a #5 at the bottom (horizontally) 16" from the bottom, and another #5 at the top (horizontally) 16" from the top, I'd say you have a pretty stout wall. In fact, I would use that scenario when pouring a basement wall. It wouldn't give much even with backfill.

Above grade, it would probably be over kill but I'd still put the steel in. (I'm guilty of overkill on occasion, as it minimizes failures).

I did a little poking around and found a very neat article on an idea I had a few years ago but never found a client I could try it on. Check it out.
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Old 03-28-2006, 03:43 AM   #13
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Building A Stone House In An Semi-Earthquake Enviroment


How is your project coming along?

Here are pictures of block walls going up for a house.
http://www.thenaturalhome.com/drystackblock.htm

Jim Bishop is building a castle in Colorado from mortar and rock, that he started in 1969.
He is doing this all by himself, and one of the towers is 160 feet tall.

http://www.bishopcastle.org/
http://www.bishopcastle.org/bishop_c...%20of%20castle

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