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-   -   Building new deck and screened in Gazebo - Wood or Composite? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/building-new-deck-screened-gazebo-wood-composite-14394/)

Todd1 12-13-2007 09:16 PM

Building new deck and screened in Gazebo - Wood or Composite?
 
We are going to tear off our old deck entirely and start with all new material. Part of deck will be open and we will also build a screened in Gazebo which will contain a nice outdoor dining set and some furniture. The Gazebo will be detached from the house but part of the deck. We live in VA and the back of our house faces South and gets full sun all day. The deck is about 15 feet in the air and will have steps leading to the ground. We can not decide between wood (pressure treated pine, cedar, IPE) or composite. We plan to stay in this house for quite awhile. Thanks

perpetual98 12-14-2007 08:39 AM

While I don't have any professional experience, I'd bite the bullet and pay the premium for the composite. If you were going to move in a few years, just make the deck look nice with wood for resale value. Since you're planning on staying, spend the coin and it'll save you money down the road when the wood would have warped/rotted/needed resealing for the 8th time.

Kinda on topic, do people use regular pressure-treated lumber underneath the composite for the framing? I would assume they did, but again, I'm still in the design stage of my deck. :)

mt232 12-14-2007 09:17 AM

search
 
If you do a quick search here you'll find great discussions on composite.....from what I read, I would not use it...no less maintenance, issues in humid areas, etc.

If you use composite, the framing underneath is still wood.

robertcdf 12-15-2007 10:49 AM

As long as you research and get the right product composite is fine. Too many people go for the big names just because they are big names... Most of these are terrible products.

Correct Deck CX will be your best bet.
Procell (or now AZEK DECK) is also another good choice however this 100% plastic.

Make sure you are using a product that addresses issues you have. Like mold Correct Deck CX takes care of mold.

If your not quite ready to build yet I would recomend this. Pick 3 composite products and buy 1 board of each in the color you want. (trust me its worth the money) Tear off a few boards of your existing deck and replace with these composite boards. Let them live with you for a 6 months to a year if you can. Then make your choice. Cut a foot off each of the boards too and keep it in your garage out of the sun so you can compare how much they change.

kiwi54 12-15-2007 06:19 PM

Bob Vila gives you a very good piece on different types of materials for composite decks, try:
http://deckandpatio.bobvila.com/Article/113.html

Me, I'm a huge natural look fan but build to the customer's wants. If you're staying in the home then go for composite or choose a harder timber for the decking. I did a deck for some folks a little while ago, they wanted low cost so selected the usual pine. Before I installed it I ran the top side through a planer, then stained and sealed the boards before I put them down. They ended up with a great looking stained deck.
Love mahogany though...:wink:

Todd1 12-25-2007 07:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robertcdf (Post 80764)
As long as you research and get the right product composite is fine. Too many people go for the big names just because they are big names... Most of these are terrible products.

Correct Deck CX will be your best bet.
Procell (or now AZEK DECK) is also another good choice however this 100% plastic.

Make sure you are using a product that addresses issues you have. Like mold Correct Deck CX takes care of mold.

I have narrowed the choices down to CorrectDeck CX in Cedar of the new Timbertech XLM in Mountain Cedar. What is the difference between these two. They both profess to resist stains, mold and scratching better than composites. ARe they made the same or are they totally different products. Which looks better and may hold up better? I will request samples of the CorrectDeck and Timbertech product but figured someone may have worked with either or both to comment. Thanks

troubleseeker 12-26-2007 07:39 PM

Heed mt232, and do a lot of reading before you commit to composite. Start with the forums at the sister site of Contractor Talk. This stuff has more problems than it is worth. I would either do ipe or one of the totally plastic products (none of which will ever convince anyone that they are wood) but at least they can deliver the low maintenance promises that the composites do not.

Todd1 12-26-2007 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by troubleseeker (Post 83161)
Heed mt232, and do a lot of reading before you commit to composite. Start with the forums at the sister site of Contractor Talk. This stuff has more problems than it is worth. I would either do ipe or one of the totally plastic products (none of which will ever convince anyone that they are wood) but at least they can deliver the low maintenance promises that the composites do not.

so does CorrectDeck CX or Timbertech XLM fit this bill. Doesn't IPE take the same maintenance as PT lumber? Does it take less? It also costs as much if not more than what I am considering. A local supplier said IPE prices are through the roof right now unfortunately. Thanks

robertcdf 12-27-2007 03:48 PM

I work with CD CX on a daily basis and if you goto CT (contractortalk.com) most of what you see will be me raving about how great it is.

Timbertech is trying to catch up to CD CX and this is thier stuff is just coming out. I personally would not like to be buying from the first batch of a new product. Let it be around for 6-12 months and then buy the TT.
I still think your best bet will be to buy a piece of each and check out how it handles your enviroment. Even if your throwing one away when its time to build your deck it will be a good way to find out what is right for you.

Port Henry 11-05-2010 11:01 AM

Try a company out of Burlington WI called Eco tech. They manufacture a 100% poly wood material for decks that cannot mildew, mold, or rot. Really great product we make our outdoor chairs out of. Wood look and color dyed all the way through. I think you would be very happy with the pricing as well. Not that expensive at all.

Daniel Holzman 11-05-2010 11:24 AM

I recently went through the same issues as you trying to decide what to use for decking. I looked at a lot of composite decking materials, I did not like the look of any of them. I examined solid wood, and determined that there are no suitable, weather resistant North American hardwood species I liked. The closest was black locust, but it is hard to obtain in straight, long pieces. Ultimately we selected Ipe, which was no more expensive than composite, but looks great.

Ipe can be left unfinished, in which case it weathers to a silver grey color over a few years. Unfinished, it has a life expectancy of around 30 years, which is really good for a natural wood product. If finished with the proper deck sealer, it retains the natural reddish hue, and is probably good for more than 30 years. If you want to maintaint the natural color, you do need to treat it with deck finish every year. My biggest concern with Ipe is that I do not want to be responsible for deforestation of the Amazon, which is where Ipe comes from, unfortunately I was unable to find a reasonable alternative.


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