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Old 01-21-2010, 11:01 AM   #1
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Building a garage.


Hi Everyone!

I found this site while looking for info about codes required for structures.
I found I need to get full drawing together before I can proceed with getting my foundation poured.
I will hire someone in to do the foundation. I would like to take part in the structure when the time comes. I need to know a couple of things first though. What is required to anchor the wall to the concrete, I have had experience with concrete anchors from past welding jobs will this suffice? What (if any) is the required span of wall studs, can steel studs be used if I can get them for cheaper price?

I will get more question put together I just had these at the front of my mind to begin with.

Thanks so much for any information in advance.

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Old 01-21-2010, 11:10 AM   #2
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Building a garage.


Concrete L shape anchors were installed when they poured my foundation walls
I put sill gasket down & PT wood then bolted the wall down

Required distance for studs I usually go with 16" OC with 2x4
You can do 24" (2x6) but then need heavier sheathing I think
In a possible hurricane area there may be stricter codes

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Old 01-21-2010, 11:18 AM   #3
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Great info thanks Scuba.
So I should look into the concrete man installing an anchor when the pour goes down?
So you used a sill gasket and pressure treated wood for the anchor point? Any adhesive for wood to concrete?

Edit - hrmm never mind about the adhesive, it just donned on me about the gasket and wood/concrete.

Last edited by Axe McGee; 01-21-2010 at 11:20 AM.
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Old 01-21-2010, 12:22 PM   #4
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Yes, the concrete crew installed the anchors right after the pour
I'm not sure on the required distance between anchors
Before I put down the sill PT plate & gasket I had to lightly grind off a raised edge of concrete from the forms
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Old 01-21-2010, 04:35 PM   #5
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Building a garage.


Bearing walls to 10' high, no 2x4's for roof, ceiling and 2 floors

Roof, ceiling and 1 floor, 2x4's but not 24"o.c. From the chart on page 2: http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=...b6CBPjc714bhbA

A little in that on steel studs, too. Here's more: http://www.steel.org/AM/Template.cfm...entDisplay.cfm

The spacing and size of the seismic straps are per your local area, usually from a Structural Engineer, approved by B.D.
Another example for doors found at Simpson: http://www.strongtie.com/products/st...wall/index.asp

Here is the basic code, starting with foundations: http://www.mcvicker.com/resguide/page008.htm

Ask your concrete guy if he scrapes or re-bar rubs down the top concrete dried slurry under the wall when he pulls forms. Otherwise, you could do it but don't wait until it hardens. No adhesive, yes- sill sealer for bugs/capillary break, as Dave said.
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...248&lpage=none

Be safe, Gary
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Old 01-21-2010, 08:05 PM   #6
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Wow! Thanks for the info Gary.
Not sure what you are saying in the last line but I will ask the concrete guy that, he probably knows.
Thanks so much!
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Old 01-21-2010, 08:42 PM   #7
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Building a garage.


Think he means to scrape off the high points from the fresh, but hardened concrete, to provide a smooth bearing area for the sill and barrier. Here, we commonly use block stem walls above the finished flow to pour a floating slab that can be shaped and formed for required for drainage (car washing, snow melt and salt).

Make sure you have enough anchor bolts because there nothing worse that you home beiing hit a detached garge that let go. After living in Virginia, I recognize your main major winds are from hurricanes if you are near the coast since the ocean seems to steer them and tornadoes away or weaken them. If you are in the west near the mountains, there may some local standards that you could look at for spacing. With a poured slab the spacing is and location is important to avoid the the conflict between the bolts and the stud locations. With block is much earier since the block are 16" long, so if the first bolt is right, the rest will be (unless you measure from the corner. - Make sure that the block have nuts and washers on them when they are set to eliminate the common problem of a bolt with no nuts on it. I have seen many GS's that lost a lot($s) when a house with no nuts on the bolts was blown off and totaled.

Dick
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Old 01-21-2010, 08:58 PM   #8
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After the concrete is placed in the forms to the pre-determined grade by caulk line or corbel (wood step for brickwork), or grade strip wood (1x1), it is smoothed and floated with tools to get it level. Some shack the forms or vibrate them with sander to help level concrete while in loose state.. As the concrete is worked about, the water surfaces as in a slab pour to form a coat on top. The more you work it with tools, the more slurry (water/concrete) mix is formed without the bigger aggregates (rocks and gravel). Then you stop working it and the ridges and puddles harden to leave high areas and raised sides against the forms. Stip the forms- it is level, but not smooth. Work these down with a 18" re-bar, back and forth as you advance across the wall top, rubbing the surface smooth so the sill sealer and mud sill will sit flat with full bearing. http://books.google.com/books?id=mFT...ncrete&f=false

Be safe, Gary Now I just need to type faster......lol
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Clean the dryer screen in HOT water if using fabric softener sheets.
They leave a residue that impedes air-flow, costing you money.
Clean the ducting in the last six months? 17,000 dryer fires annually!

Last edited by Gary in WA; 01-21-2010 at 09:00 PM.
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Old 01-21-2010, 09:18 PM   #9
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Gotcha, Fantastic help and great information.
I am so glad I came here!

I'm looking more into the steel framing thing, seems interesting, I spoke to the guy who I wanted to GC the garage and he said he had never worked with steel. Which got me thinking how bad could it be. In reality it seems eaiser. I used to do aluminum work (gutters, siding, soffit/fascia) when I was much younger. I may have a go at the steel thing on a storage shed first and maybe progress to the garage.

To me it's all about learning, if I can't learn from doing something or to do something I feel time is being wasted. I will get some photos up of the shed project and see how that goes. I really needed to get the garage foundation done so we will stop tracking in dirt and stones from the present parking area. It appears I need to get drawings and a few other things in order to get just the slab poured.

Thanks again guys you have been a huge source of information, I hope I can help you or someone else out someday in return.
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Old 01-21-2010, 10:15 PM   #10
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Just hold down the building/ garagewth anchor bolts and remenber that every screw you put in and romve the plating and screw protection since they generally self threat them selves. If you have no moisture it is not a big problem, moisture in an enclosed wall does not disappear very quickly

Dick.
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Old 01-22-2010, 01:22 PM   #11
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So a question I need to ask the concrete sub is what anchors will he be using or can i drill and and anchor when I get ready to build. I have used the "redhead" bolt type anchors before with good results for iron work, and can get them at a decent price at almost any size.

These guys http://www.concretefasteners.com/anc...eve/index.aspx

Thanks again.
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Old 01-22-2010, 01:30 PM   #12
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Building a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Axe McGee View Post
So a question I need to ask the concrete sub is what anchors will he be using or can i drill and and anchor when I get ready to build. I have used the "redhead" bolt type anchors before with good results for iron work, and can get them at a decent price at almost any size.

These guys http://www.concretefasteners.com/anc...eve/index.aspx

Thanks again.
you would need to check with your Local Inspector Gurus to find out if drop-ins are approved. Anchor bolts are commonly approved everywhere, just the spacing might change due to local requirements.
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Old 01-22-2010, 02:45 PM   #13
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Gotcha!

Thanks
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Old 01-23-2010, 12:31 PM   #14
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I used drop-ins and 1/2" all thread on mine. Layed the block out on top of the slab first then marked out where the studs and doors would be to make sure no anchors were in the wrong place. The city required an anchor every 7' but I put twice that many in.

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