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Old 11-17-2009, 10:22 PM   #1
gbe
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building framing question


I'm looking to build a small structure on a slab, and need some help figuring out the best way to plan. The idea is to have a 12'x18' wood framed room, with a 6' porch extending on one of the short sides, covered with a gable roof (total covered size 12'x24').

What I am picturing (and it could be completely wrong) is to have a 6"x6" post on each corner of the porch; two tie into the framed walls, the others form the outer supports for the gable roof. I would run beams (either built up header-type beams or more posts?) to span the 6' and 12' spans to provide support. Does this seem correct? How do I attach the beams to the posts - toenailing or straps? Should I just bolt some 2"x6"s to the outsides and connect them that way?

There is a minuscule chance of appreciable snow in this area, and the roof pitch is to be 6/12 (3' tall at the peak, 6' run on each side).

All help and criticisms are appreciated - I find its best to learn before screwing up rather than vice-versa.

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Old 11-17-2009, 10:41 PM   #2
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building framing question


I suggest you buy a book on framing, there are lots of different ones for sale in the local book store. Alternatively, you could purchase a fully developed set of plans. The plans or the book will give you guidance on proper framing procedures. Although Baton Rouge gets no snow, it is subject to high winds from hurricanes ( I worked down there for a year after hurricanes Katrina and Rita), so it is important that the roof be connected to the walls using hurricane clips. Any decent framing book will explain exactly how to make such a connection.

As for connecting the wood framing members, there are a number of ways to do this, the framing book will explain typical nailing patterns, sizing of the pieces, use of metal connectors, and lots of other details too numerous to mention in a post.

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Old 11-17-2009, 10:43 PM   #3
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building framing question


6x6 is overkill, all you need are 4x4 posts. 6x6 posts are only used in larger structures like a four story condo, or I've seen them in garages where you have a beam extending a long ways to the center. But sounds like you are building a small shed, so you shouldn't need anything bigger than 4x4's.

When you connect the beams to the building, you can either build a beam pocket or use beam hangers. A beam pocket is the nicer way to do it, you need two 2x4's nailed together for supports under each beam, giving you three inches of bearing. And you need a king stud at the end of your beam extending to the top of it, which will be nailed to your supporting studs. And you are supposed to have a metal strap giving you a positive connection between the beam and the supporting 2x4's under it. But if you are using plywood siding, that's probably enough to tie everything together without the need for a strap, since it's only a storage shed.

A 4x8 beam should be enough to span your six feet for the porch. So you would only need two treated 4x4's, one for each beam on the ends. Stick frame your roof out of 2x6, and you're good to go.
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Old 11-18-2009, 09:45 AM   #4
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building framing question


Thanks to both of you.

I bought a framing book and while it has a ton of info on various framing techniques, its a bit vague on this area. I did a bit more research and believe I've found the answers I need to start drafting it up.

As for hurricane straps - believe me, they're going on there. Its location is a prime target for heavy winds, and I don't want it collapsing or losing its roof.
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Old 11-24-2009, 03:05 AM   #5
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Yeah, I tried to learn framing from a book too. It doesn't really work, a book won't tell you how to do anything specific, unless you get one of those books that tells you how to build certain types of sheds step by step. Framing books will give you a good reference for stuff, but when it comes to actually doing it, you got to use your imagination.
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