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Old 11-12-2012, 06:21 PM   #1
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building a deck above a work area in my barn


If I use 6 x 6 treated posts 20' long as beams and have them spaced 12' apart. Can I use 2 x 12 joists at 16" spacing to build a deck? If so how much weight would the floor support pr sq foot and would I need to use posts in the center of each beam?


Last edited by Larion Swartzen; 11-12-2012 at 06:24 PM. Reason: some words were added accidently
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Old 11-12-2012, 08:52 PM   #2
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building a deck above a work area in my barn


Welcome to the forum!

I'm not following .... 20' long beam and 12' spacing of post seems you'd come up about 4' short on your beam

I'd suggest checkin' out the American Wood Council's "Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide" based upon the requirements of the 2009 International Residential Code (this code may or may not apply to your area). it will give you the required size of beams and joists based upon their spans, and how to build a code compliant deck.

Hope this helps ...

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Old 11-12-2012, 09:23 PM   #3
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building a deck above a work area in my barn


No, you cannot use 6x6 for beams in most cases.
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Old 11-13-2012, 06:01 AM   #4
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building a deck above a work area in my barn


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBrackins
Welcome to the forum!

I'm not following .... 20' long beam and 12' spacing of post seems you'd come up about 4' short on your beam

I'd suggest checkin' out the American Wood Council's "Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide" based upon the requirements of the 2009 International Residential Code (this code may or may not apply to your area). it will give you the required size of beams and joists based upon their spans, and how to build a code compliant deck.

Hope this helps ...
He's saying that he wants to use 20' 6x6's 12' apart for girders perpendicular to 2x12's 16" centers.
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Old 11-13-2012, 10:16 AM   #5
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building a deck above a work area in my barn


multiple (4) 2x6's or whatever actually make a stronger beam then a single 6x6.

Is headroom an issue?
Tell use the size of the area you want to build this deck. also the intended use.

If your going wall to wall ( or support) your going to need some large beams or engineered ones.
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