Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-18-2013, 05:34 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Montana
Posts: 124
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Building a beam


Using 2 2x10's for deck beam is there a specific nailing pattern I would need to use? My google searches are turning up too many different options.

Also would 10d nails work as the beam will only be 3'' wide?

Thanks,

dabeast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2013, 05:54 PM   #2
Member
 
cortell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 708
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Building a beam


Quote:
Originally Posted by dabeast View Post
Using 2 2x10's for deck beam is there a specific nailing pattern I would need to use? My google searches are turning up too many different options.

Also would 10d nails work as the beam will only be 3'' wide?

Thanks,
Yes. 10d is what you want. If you're using a nailer, drive them at a *very slight* angle so that the tip of overdriven nails don't protrude and become a hazard.

Commonly prescribed pattern is two nails at each end then one 8" OC at the top and bottom, staggered. That said, many framers just do a vertical run of three nails 24" OC or so.

cortell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2013, 11:02 PM   #3
journeyman carpenter
 
woodworkbykirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: nova scotia canada
Posts: 2,747
Rewards Points: 2,110
Default

Building a beam


well first off 2 2x10`s isnt a beam you need 3 ply. as for nailing rows of 4 spikes 16" O.C is standard practice
woodworkbykirk is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to woodworkbykirk For This Useful Post:
ben's plumbing (10-20-2013)
Old 10-18-2013, 11:11 PM   #4
Member
 
GBrackins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Posts: 2,872
Rewards Points: 2,022
Default

Building a beam


is the beam top loaded or side loaded? that determines the proper lamination of the plies.
__________________
Gary

"You get what you pay for, and sometimes free costs more!"
GBrackins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2013, 12:55 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Montana
Posts: 124
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Building a beam


Quote:
Originally Posted by GBrackins View Post
is the beam top loaded or side loaded? that determines the proper lamination of the plies.
Side loaded I guess? It is for a deck and will be notched into a 6x6.
dabeast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2013, 08:20 AM   #6
Member
 
cortell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 708
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Building a beam


Quote:
Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk View Post
well first off 2 2x10`s isnt a beam you need 3 ply. as for nailing rows of 4 spikes 16" O.C is standard practice
Really? Someone better tell the AWC and IRC to update their beam tables.

BTW, dabeast, the answer to your question is on page 6 (figure 4, Beam Assembly Details)
http://www.awc.org/publications/dca/dca6/dca6-09.pdf
Attached Thumbnails
Building a beam-beams.jpg  
cortell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2013, 08:26 AM   #7
Member
 
GBrackins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Posts: 2,872
Rewards Points: 2,022
Default

Building a beam


if the joists are attached to the side of the beam then I'd use screws or bolts. as cortell said above check out the American Wood Council's "Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide," which is based upon the code requirements of the 2009 International Residential Code.

http://www.awc.org/publications/dca/dca6/dca6-09.pdf

you may want to review this guide to ensure proper design of your deck.

Good luck!
__________________
Gary

"You get what you pay for, and sometimes free costs more!"
GBrackins is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to GBrackins For This Useful Post:
cortell (10-19-2013)
Old 10-19-2013, 11:55 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Montana
Posts: 124
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Building a beam


So the deck will be 8' deep 16' wide I have a total of 3 posts per beam (every 8') 2 2x10x16 will build each beam (free standing deck).

I will be using joist hangers to flush mount the joists to the top of the beam (space issues).

What i'm looking for is the best way to join the 2 2x10x16's together. Could I nail one side in a W pattern as show in the deck guide posted above and then flip it over and do it on the other side? Or should I use screws and/or bolts?

Thanks
dabeast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2013, 12:45 AM   #9
Member
 
GBrackins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Posts: 2,872
Rewards Points: 2,022
Default

Building a beam


screws or bolts for side loaded beam, you don't want any lateral movement to separate the plies.
__________________
Gary

"You get what you pay for, and sometimes free costs more!"
GBrackins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2013, 09:28 AM   #10
AHH, SPANS!!!
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Durham NC
Posts: 1,684
Rewards Points: 1,032
Default

Building a beam


for a beam I nail a vertical 5 nail pattern every 16" and then flip around and do the same from the other side except start the nail pattern centered between your first rows so if you were to look down on the beam the nail rows would be spaced 8" apart.
hand drive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2013, 09:40 AM   #11
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,273
Rewards Points: 2,124
Default

Building a beam


All you need to achieve with your nailing is enough resistance to develop adequate horizontal shear capacity between the two pieces making up the beam. This can be calculated (the formulas are a bit complex and I will avoid a primer on structural mechanics), or more commonly you just go with local practice. In my area, the typical approach is to start with two 10d nails on one end, about two inches from the end of the beam, and about 1-1/2 inches respectively from the top and bottom. You then nail in a staggered pattern every six inches, top and bottom, from the outer face in. My deck is built that way, and it worked out fine.

Use proper nails for PT lumber, hot dipped galvanized. You can use bolts or structurally rated screws, but why bother, nails are simple and proven.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2013, 12:35 PM   #12
journeyman carpenter
 
woodworkbykirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: nova scotia canada
Posts: 2,747
Rewards Points: 2,110
Default

Building a beam


Quote:
Originally Posted by cortell View Post
Really? Someone better tell the AWC and IRC to update their beam tables.

BTW, dabeast, the answer to your question is on page 6 (figure 4, Beam Assembly Details)
http://www.awc.org/publications/dca/dca6/dca6-09.pdf

difference in region then, here in canada 2plys will never pass inspectino

woodworkbykirk is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Re: old buildings RWolff Building & Construction 157 01-19-2014 01:35 AM
Help with building a beam for the basement Bonebag Building & Construction 13 04-02-2013 11:01 PM
Building interior basement wall under laminated wood beam. PlastikSpork Building & Construction 25 07-28-2012 11:55 AM
Old Building problems jake62 Building & Construction 5 08-20-2010 09:32 AM
Crawl Space Beam and Joist Support Questions Fire4Effect Building & Construction 5 06-28-2009 02:07 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.