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Old 06-22-2010, 12:57 PM   #1
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Building an addition!!


All,

Yes, I can hear the applause because I am FINALLY back online. HAHA, just kidding!! Anyway, this is what I am doing now. I am building a 16x40 addition onto the back of my house and need some advice on the following...

I am using 2x4 (16" oc) for the framework and using 2x4 (24" oc) trusses. I need to know if I can use 7/16 OSB (1/2") for the roof decking as well as for the plywood on the outside of the walls. I will also be using housewrap and the blue or pink foamboard underneath the vinyl siding I am putting down. I just need to know if the 7/16 OSB is going to be strong enough and if it will work.

Secondly, should I remove the old siding from the house all the way down to the studs so that I can put sheetrock directly on the wall of the house, which will now be an interior wall? The vinyl siding is going to removed anyway, but was wondering if removing everything down to the studs would be a better idea. I think it would, but I would like your opinion as well.

Thanks!!

Mike Joyner
San Antonio, TX

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Old 06-22-2010, 01:44 PM   #2
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Building an addition!!


IMO, unless you are trying to match to an existing roof line and depending on what sort of snow load you could get, I would go with 3/4" to prevent sagging.


Sure, you can rip the wall down to the studs. In fact, you may want to just for access to run electrical and so forth. If there are no plans for any of that, you could always strap it with 1x3's and drywall over them.

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Old 06-22-2010, 01:58 PM   #3
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I'm in San Antonio so there isn't really a worry with snow load. Do you think 1/2 is too thin for the roof?
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Old 06-22-2010, 02:10 PM   #4
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Hmm...not sure about the climate there, humidity, etc., so you may want to get another opinion. Still 24"oc seems a little wide for 7/16" for roofing.
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Old 06-22-2010, 02:31 PM   #5
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I put 7/16 on my shed roof and it seemed pretty good but did flex just a tad. Since this is going on a house, I think I will go with something a little thicker as you described. However, I just found this on the Internet so 7/16 will actually work, according to this...

"The minimum thickness of wood structural panels, i.e., OSB or plywood, for roof-sheathing applications depends on loading requirements, rafter spacing, and edge support conditions. Refer to the 2003 International Residential Codes (IRC) Table R503.2.1.1(1), or APA Engineered Wood Construction Guide at www.apawood.org for specific requirements for a variety of roof configurations. As an example, in a region with 30 pounds per square foot snow load, and a house with rafter spaced at 24 inches on center, 7/16-inch-thick OSB can be used without edge support or 3/8-inch-thick OSB can be used when edge support is provided by either tongue-and-grove or approved panel clips."
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Old 06-22-2010, 03:09 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psychomti View Post
I However, I just found this on the Internet so 7/16 will actually work, according to this...

So, Elvis IS ALIVE!!!!!

Just kidding mate

Seriously though, it wouldn't hurt to take a trip to the local munic...no harm in asking.
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Old 06-22-2010, 06:28 PM   #7
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Building an addition!!


Psych,
I would still go heavier than 7/16 on the roof, even if you are in San Ant. or not. For 24" centers I use 5/8" cdx plywood. I don't particularly care for osb. If you walk on that roof with 7/16, you'll know it. Also the 5/8" cdx will give you a nice flat plane without the dips between trusses. In the whole scheme of things, it's not that big of an expense for having a well built structure.
Mike Hawkins


Quote:
Originally Posted by psychomti View Post
I put 7/16 on my shed roof and it seemed pretty good but did flex just a tad. Since this is going on a house, I think I will go with something a little thicker as you described. However, I just found this on the Internet so 7/16 will actually work, according to this...

"The minimum thickness of wood structural panels, i.e., OSB or plywood, for roof-sheathing applications depends on loading requirements, rafter spacing, and edge support conditions. Refer to the 2003 International Residential Codes (IRC) Table R503.2.1.1(1), or APA Engineered Wood Construction Guide at www.apawood.org for specific requirements for a variety of roof configurations. As an example, in a region with 30 pounds per square foot snow load, and a house with rafter spaced at 24 inches on center, 7/16-inch-thick OSB can be used without edge support or 3/8-inch-thick OSB can be used when edge support is provided by either tongue-and-grove or approved panel clips."
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Old 06-22-2010, 09:53 PM   #8
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Osb is ok here but my Inspector is not your local one...........

Leave the sheathing on the house if you can because usually an Engineer will assign other walls in that same plane for structural panels against seismic and wind forces to transmit the lateral forces. You need it on both sides of that big hole entering an addition.........
Or add some diagonal metal straps in place of: http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...c-twb-rcwb.asp


Be safe, Gary

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