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-   -   Build a covered patio on existing slab (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/build-covered-patio-existing-slab-98583/)

Dornier 03-16-2011 10:36 AM

Build a covered patio on existing slab
 
I'm currently doing demo on a 20-yr old wooden deck. Beside being warped and rotting, in our area it's been a breeding ground for insects and is really irritating.

At the very least we are going to put a 4" slab down.

We are also considering ideas for a covered patio or a screened enclosure. However, we don't know exactly what the final choice will be, but the deck has to go as summer down here is approaching.

If we did a covered patio, it would be a wood underside (not finished plywood or drywall as I've seen around the neighborhood) and have a fan or two for circulation.

The question is:

1. Is it possible to build a covered patio WITHOUT pouring concrete for the [corners and one or two middle] posts? I don't know if we're doing that or where they'll need to go.

pjordan4477 03-16-2011 10:42 AM

Set your posts like you would for a deck. 1/3 of the length in the ground with concrete.

Look into building the cover as a gable off the house, so that enclosing it is easy later on down the road.

Dornier 03-16-2011 10:54 AM

Thanks for the reply.

However, I don't know if a covered patio is in the future. We haven't decided. But, we have to get a slab going before summer.

So, what can I do (in terms of pouring the slab) to prepare it for whatever covering I put over it?

I can't pour posts without a design.

Can I reinforce the perimeter of the slab and later affix the posts to it, or must the posts be set below ground--in which case I would have to demo through the slab I just built, right?

I guess I didn't ask the question right.

Thanks again.

pjordan4477 03-16-2011 03:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dornier (Post 610586)
Thanks for the reply.

However, I don't know if a covered patio is in the future. We haven't decided. But, we have to get a slab going before summer.

So, what can I do (in terms of pouring the slab) to prepare it for whatever covering I put over it?

I can't pour posts without a design.

Can I reinforce the perimeter of the slab and later affix the posts to it, or must the posts be set below ground--in which case I would have to demo through the slab I just built, right?

I guess I didn't ask the question right.

Thanks again.


so slab, then cover, then enclose. Let's call it a 3 yr project.

I would buy the posts and set them prior to pouring a slab. Then pour the slab. What to do with the posts in the air you ask. Get plant hangers and hang solar light from them. Now they are light posts. I did this with a floating deck I put in my yard and it worked great. They don't attract bugs either. I could turn the 4 posts into a pergola real quick and easy.

It looks cool too.

Ron6519 03-16-2011 04:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dornier (Post 610569)
I'm currently doing demo on a 20-yr old wooden deck. Beside being warped and rotting, in our area it's been a breeding ground for insects and is really irritating.

At the very least we are going to put a 4" slab down.

We are also considering ideas for a covered patio or a screened enclosure. However, we don't know exactly what the final choice will be, but the deck has to go as summer down here is approaching.

If we did a covered patio, it would be a wood underside (not finished plywood or drywall as I've seen around the neighborhood) and have a fan or two for circulation.

The question is:

1. Is it possible to build a covered patio WITHOUT pouring concrete for the [corners and one or two middle] posts? I don't know if we're doing that or where they'll need to go.

Plan what you're going to do before you pick up any tools. If you're going to cover the slab eventually, plan it out now and sink your footings below the frost line. I'm not a fan of sinking posts in concrete. I'd rather bolt standoffs to the footings and mount the posts to those so they were off the ground.
In any case, you'll need plans and a permit to do any of this unless you live in a rural area with no oversight. you might contact them for planning guidance.
Ron

Dornier 03-16-2011 07:05 PM

I've never done footings before. Would a slab on a gradient suffice? It won't be an enclosure, just a simple roof with two posts--maybe three. We are deciding on dimensions still.

Yeah, the HOA is going to want plans but it's pretty relaxed here, and the job is not large at all...unless I have to re-route the lawn sprinklers' line. I don't know where the previous owner ran them.

Thanks.

Ron6519 03-17-2011 07:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dornier (Post 610934)
I've never done footings before. Would a slab on a gradient suffice? It won't be an enclosure, just a simple roof with two posts--maybe three. We are deciding on dimensions still.

Yeah, the HOA is going to want plans but it's pretty relaxed here, and the job is not large at all...unless I have to re-route the lawn sprinklers' line. I don't know where the previous owner ran them.

Thanks.

You'll need footings below the frost line.
You can incorporate the footings into the slab pour. You just need to remember where they are. If you set the stand offs at the time of the pour, you'll be all set.
Ron

Wildie 03-17-2011 07:20 PM

I retrofitted a roof over a 6" patio slab. I was required to underpin the slab using a SONO tube down to footings that were below the frost line. (4' here)
Each underpin supported the roof posts. The roof posts were fastened to the slab using Simpson post anchors.
I would suggest that you would install the footings and SONO tubes before installing the slab.
To put them in after makes the job three times harder.

pjordan4477 03-18-2011 10:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dornier (Post 610569)
The question is:

1. Is it possible to build a covered patio WITHOUT pouring concrete for the [corners and one or two middle] posts? I don't know if we're doing that or where they'll need to go.


It would help to know where you're from, cause these sonotube depths are based on climate. It'may not be that severe in your area.

Wildie 03-18-2011 12:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pjordan4477 (Post 611895)
It would help to know where you're from, cause these sonotube depths are based on climate. It'may not be that severe in your area.

Yes! And snow load on the roof is another factor. Then, if you live an area that has high winds, such as tornado's, lift has to be considered.

What you should do is design the job, slab and roof. Then, you'll know what has to be attended to now, and what can be deferred til later.

Willie T 03-18-2011 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dornier (Post 610586)
Thanks for the reply.

However, I don't know if a covered patio is in the future. We haven't decided. But, we have to get a slab going before summer.

So, what can I do (in terms of pouring the slab) to prepare it for whatever covering I put over it?

I can't pour posts without a design.

Can I reinforce the perimeter of the slab and later affix the posts to it, or must the posts be set below ground--in which case I would have to demo through the slab I just built, right?

I guess I didn't ask the question right.

Thanks again.

Very definitely, YES, you can do it that way. In fact it is a much better way than encasing wooden posts in concrete which will eventually cause them to rot from moisture absorption . The only problem will be that you will have to provide some sort of lateral bracing attached to your future posts for stability.

Wildie 03-18-2011 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dornier (Post 610934)
I've never done footings before. Would a slab on a gradient suffice? It won't be an enclosure, just a simple roof with two posts--maybe three. We are deciding on dimensions still.

Yeah, the HOA is going to want plans but it's pretty relaxed here, and the job is not large at all...unless I have to re-route the lawn sprinklers' line. I don't know where the previous owner ran them.

Thanks.

You have neglected to state the location of where you live.
Until you do so, all that is suggested is conjecture, and if you wish good advice, location is important.
Florida is done differently than Wisconsin.

Dornier 03-21-2011 06:55 PM

I'm Texas. Only a few days a year below 30.

I'm also wondering on base depth. The existing small slab I'm adding to is only
2". I wanted a 4" and have conflicting sources on the depth of sand and gravel.

For 2" above grassline I've seen 4" of sand and gravel, tamped, should be enough.

?

As for posts there will be two and I've got the areas marked.


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