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Old 11-24-2015, 11:53 PM   #1
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Best species of wood for T&G porch flooring?


I will soon be replacing the tongue and groove porch flooring on my upper balcony and was wanting some opinions on the best species of wood to use for the T&G. I live in the south and so we get a lot of high humidity. So I'm looking for a species of T&G that can handle the high humidity rate as well as take paint well. Also if any of you could provide any tips for installing the T&G etc... I'd appreciate it. I want it to last! Sorry, I tried posting a picture but it's not letting me for some reason.

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Old 11-25-2015, 02:04 AM   #2
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Any of the products like Trex is what is normally used. Less maintenance and stands up to all kinds of weather.

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Old 11-25-2015, 02:24 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
Any of the products like Trex is what is normally used. Less maintenance and stands up to all kinds of weather.
Sorry should have mentioned this is a Recorded Texas Historical Landmark (RTHL), and will be required to stay with wood T&G.
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Old 11-25-2015, 06:07 AM   #4
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http://www.perennialwood.com/Product...rchBoards.aspx
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Old 11-25-2015, 06:35 AM   #5
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Any I've done where done with Fur.
Want it to last and not cup the trick is to seal it on all sides before installing.
I got lucky and found an old time real lumber yard that makes there own, 0 flaws, no knots, and they mill the grove wider so after applying the paint the wood still has room to expand and contract.
I use ceramic coated trim head screws using an impact driver to install it.
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Old 11-25-2015, 10:41 AM   #6
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Being in the south and in a historic district also, I personally would see if I could find some cypress and seal it like said above. I don't like pine, that is for sure.
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Old 11-25-2015, 11:29 AM   #7
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Are they requiring wood or requiring T&G? I have a man made T&G on my porches and it looks great. Even at close range I haven't had anyone realize it wasn't wood. The stuff I used was called Tendura, but I believe it's Correct porch now. In the area I live many people are going with Mahongany. If this really is historical and they have requirements what are they? I would think they would tell you what wood to use if they are requiring that? AFAIK Fir is what was traditionally always used (in my area anyway) so to be true to historical correctness I would think that is the only choice?
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Old 11-25-2015, 12:17 PM   #8
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KC I'll check in to that product thanks. It will just need to replicate what is there now, otherwise the THC will not approve it. Jim, I looked around online and there is a mill down the road from me in Austin that specializes in Cypress and mills T&G boards. Being that my house, a 1855 Greek Revival, is made of some cypress (beams and such) I'll check into that. Thanks for all the tips and help fellas
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Old 11-25-2015, 07:32 PM   #9
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No location in your profile so we had to make a guess as to what wood would be avalible localy.
Cypress is a good choice would take me a month for me to get it and cost 4 times as much in my area.
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Old 11-26-2015, 09:33 PM   #10
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Will, I've done a few of the historic homes. Our Historic Society is very picky about the what and how of everything they can control. If you have that type of environment you might ask about 1x 4 Yellow Pine T&G flooring that is first primed with Boiled Linseed oil. Then once installed, painted with a Urethane type flooring finish. The key is the boiled linseed oil BEFORE the flooring is applied. It takes about 2 weeks for it to dry but it's the old timey way they did it when houses didn't have electricity or indoor plumbing. It's still used in historic areas as it works for preserving wood to the outdoors. Obviously the idea is to cut off any moisture or rain getting to the cells in the wood fiber. Regardless of the wood, cedar, cypress, pine, etc if it gets any water moisture to it, it will swell. If you've ever seen a porch floor that the wood is all cupped up, now you know.

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