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Old 02-14-2007, 06:56 PM   #1
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Over the weekend I installed a double lvl that spans 15' in my living room to increase support to the above attic. The end posts are 4x4 douglas fir. One end sits on the sill plate on an exterior wall. The other end sits on a sill plate in the middle of the house. In the basement, directly under this space the main beam that supports the house is about 2-3 feet away from where the post would fall. Should I add support to this area, or is the beam in the basement close enough to help with the weight.

To be exact the post falls right on a floor joist. My house is old and has about 5 inches of flooring, so its very thick.

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Old 02-14-2007, 07:00 PM   #2
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To properly be supported, there should be support directly under that post you installed.
It is not enough to be 'near' the weight load, it should be under it....

In other words, you should double up that joist that it is sitting above and add a supporting post under the doubled up joist (the joist that is directly under the post you added). That support should be on 12" of concrete rather than just the concrete floor of the basement...

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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-14-2007 at 07:05 PM.
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Old 02-14-2007, 07:06 PM   #3
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Would lumber be okay to use under an adjustable post? I had a contractor come in and raise a sloping floor by using a 6x6 timber that the colums are on top of. Could I do the same?

If not, how do I get 12" of concrete for a base?
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Old 02-14-2007, 08:20 PM   #4
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Would lumber be okay to use under an adjustable post? I had a contractor come in and raise a sloping floor by using a 6x6 timber that the colums are on top of. Could I do the same?

If not, how do I get 12" of concrete for a base?
The contractor used that as a temporary set up. You see, proper load bearing footings are 12" of concrete(when there is not a frost line).
Your contractor used the lumber to 'displace' the weight...so it wouldn't crack your basement floor, which are usually only 3" to 4" in depth.

You could try using a pre formed 6" post base on top of your basement floor for your post. I say this especially since you are only ADDING this as an auxiliary means of support (The set up you have installed is not your primary means of structural support in your home).

You can then use a 6x6 post under your doubled joists .Set it onto the concrete post base...and you should be good...again, since you are using this set up as an auxiliary means of support....

(For information purposes: We create a 12" footing in a finished basement by: Cutting or jack hammering out a 2'x2' area of the concrete floor. Then we make an actual 2'x2' 'form' with P.T. - 2x12's. Then mix up a nice batch of concrete with a little Portland cement added, thro in some re-bar and pour. Trowel smooth...done....)
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Old 02-14-2007, 09:13 PM   #5
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I agree. This is just an addition. I would be doing the "right" way if it entailed any more. I have one more thing to add and get your opinion. The area in the basement is near the floor drain. The concrete starts to slope in this are. I'm not sure if a preformed concrete base would sit level on the floor. Is there any thing I could do, such as adding a cement leveler or another option for this area? As I stated earlier the post lands 2-3 ft from the main beam. I could add another support so that the post would be right in the middle of the main beam and the new support. But, it would NOT be right underneath the post from above.
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Old 02-14-2007, 10:17 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by cibula11 View Post
I agree. This is just an addition. I would be doing the "right" way if it entailed any more. I have one more thing to add and get your opinion. The area in the basement is near the floor drain. The concrete starts to slope in this are. I'm not sure if a preformed concrete base would sit level on the floor. Is there any thing I could do, such as adding a cement leveler or another option for this area? As I stated earlier the post lands 2-3 ft from the main beam. I could add another support so that the post would be right in the middle of the main beam and the new support. But, it would NOT be right underneath the post from above.
Get a framing square, level, plumb-bob, paper, pencil and a chunk of P.T. 2X12.

Figure out what the slight pitch is and form the 2x12 into a wedge that will work there. Install it with some quick dry concrete mix (use it like an adhesive between the wedge and the concrete floor to lock it in place)....when dry...continue your work....

...Again...this is an auxiliary support, so that is why I suggest this method as opposed to what you would need to do to create a primary structural support.....
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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-14-2007 at 10:19 PM.
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Old 02-15-2007, 09:02 AM   #7
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Thanks. I do understand that this is not the correct way to provide primary support. I will not be upset with you or anyone on this forum for choosing this option. So far there has been no sag or movement of this beam....so I don't anticipate this being a major structural improvement. Thanks for your advice...I will post back when the job is complete. Any other advice??
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Old 02-15-2007, 09:16 AM   #8
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Key point is getting SOLID material in a 'line' from the supported area all the way down to a footing....
Solid material can be: wood, steel, concrete....
Other point is that these materials be properly - attached/fastened, or attached mechanically (bolted) ....
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Old 02-15-2007, 11:22 AM   #9
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You mentioned somwhere else that you could use a wall in your basement which would run parallel to your main beam, and within a foot of upstairs post support of new beam.

Could a solution also be to build a small 3' beam, install it ontop and perpendicular to main house beam next to floor joist which is directly under upstairs post, and run it over to the top of new wall? The small beam could actually be built like sistering joists, but sister that joist like 4 times creating a "beam". One end on house beam, one on new load bearing wall with mulitple 2x4's nailed together directily under small beam load point.....
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Old 02-15-2007, 11:30 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by harleysilo View Post
You mentioned somwhere else that you could use a wall in your basement which would run parallel to your main beam, and within a foot of upstairs post support of new beam.

Could a solution also be to build a small 3' beam, install it ontop and perpendicular to main house beam next to floor joist which is directly under upstairs post, and run it over to the top of new wall? The small beam could actually be built like sistering joists, but sister that joist like 4 times creating a "beam". One end on house beam, one on new load bearing wall with mulitple 2x4's nailed together directily under small beam load point.....
I'm not sure that I am following you...but by the sounds of it ...then there would be nothing under the 'beam' on the side (opposite the side) that is on the main carrying beam?
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Old 02-15-2007, 12:29 PM   #11
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Yeah I had thought that since there is a shower head in this general area that I could just frame in a sort of wall that would enclose the shower area. Right now its just in the middle of the basement next to the floor drain. But, in doing this, I'm not sure if could get support right underneath the post from upstairs, which sounds like that would not be the way to go. SO, if I did frame a wall in....I would need to make sure that I had support directly under the post.
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Old 02-15-2007, 02:00 PM   #12
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Old 02-15-2007, 02:24 PM   #13
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You got it. Not to "beat a dead horse", but am I hearing that this would NOT be the way to go?? I know Atlantic WB said that I need a line that extends all the way to the floor. This would not give me a "line".
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Old 02-15-2007, 02:43 PM   #14
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No it would not give you a line. But he didn't understand my explaination clearly either.

Also, if you could only support something with a line, you couldn't have installed your beam.....
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Old 02-15-2007, 02:50 PM   #15
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So are you saying that this IS an option? I about died putting the beam in and I really don't want to go all extreme in this project. Just something that will get the job done. I'll do what I need to, but I don't want to have to keep doing things over later.

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