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-   -   Beam splice (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/beam-splice-2735/)

thammond 06-12-2006 05:58 PM

Beam splice
 
I am building a deck and have a question regarding the beams. The beam length will be 18 feet long. The style beam I am using is a sandwich type beam (4x4 post with 2x8 on each side bolted at the post). Since I have 16' long 2x8's I am going to have to splice the 2x8's somewhere. I have looked at a number of how to books, but no of them cover this situation. My asumption is to butt join them at a post and have 4 bolts going through that post, 2 in eah 2x8.

Is this correct or not?

Darylh 06-12-2006 11:12 PM

That's what I would do with one little extra. I would take a 2x4 and cut it around 16" long and put a 45 Degree angle on the bottom and screw it to the post under your 2x8 for extra support.

robertcdf 06-13-2006 12:20 AM

Check with your local building department before starting work on your deck. In my area the beam style you are planning on using would not pass code. Beams should SIT on TOP of post never bolted to the side. And splices MUST be centered on a post.

Joe Carola 06-13-2006 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thammond
I am building a deck and have a question regarding the beams. The beam length will be 18 feet long. The style beam I am using is a sandwich type beam (4x4 post with 2x8 on each side bolted at the post). Since I have 16' long 2x8's I am going to have to splice the 2x8's somewhere. I have looked at a number of how to books, but no of them cover this situation. My asumption is to butt join them at a post and have 4 bolts going through that post, 2 in eah 2x8.

Is this correct or not?

Why can't you get 18' 2x8's?

As far as it being correct. You have to see if it's code in your town. Do you have permits?

AtlanticWBConst. 06-17-2006 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thammond
I am building a deck and have a question regarding the beams. The beam length will be 18 feet long. The style beam I am using is a sandwich type beam (4x4 post with 2x8 on each side bolted at the post). Since I have 16' long 2x8's I am going to have to splice the 2x8's somewhere. I have looked at a number of how to books, but no of them cover this situation. My asumption is to butt join them at a post and have 4 bolts going through that post, 2 in eah 2x8.

Is this correct or not?


ANSWER: It is Very INCORRECT.

It should be set up Just like Robertcdf wrote above.... Code: Beams always sit ON TOP of the posts.

thammond 06-19-2006 10:13 PM

Beam Splice
 
Yes, I have a permit, and the sandwhich beam style was approved. Most of the decks that I have seen built in my area, southeastern Wisconsin seem to have this style beams. Also all of the books I have read about duilding decks for DIY's say this is an acceptable method for building decks.

I will get 18' 2x8's, as I think that is a better approach than what I was planning. I'm too far along to switch beam styles, as my deck is going to be close to the ground. If I were to use a beam on top, my 4x4 posts would only be a couple inches long.

IHI 06-20-2006 12:28 PM

At least it's low enough then so if it fails then it will not drop very far so no real physical damages should be incurred. At the very least I would buy and install beam brackets under the beam used in conjuntion with your sandwhich idea to give the beam support through 2 different methods.

if using 4x4 posts cut posts to set beams on top of them and use brackets to attach, 4x6 posts notch out section for twin beams so it sets in the pocket and then bolt through both beams and remaining post that did'nt get notched.

In either case, the bottom of your beam will be where the bottom of the beam is weather you sandwhich or cut/notch posts so I fail to see the "too close to the ground" as a reason not to do it the safest way possible:confused: When I was a kid parents bought a house with a deck built like you are going to and 8 years later the entire thing collapsed, luckily nobody was on the deck at the time or it would've been ugly.

bob the builder 06-20-2006 07:21 PM

Yes, I also see many decks done with beam bolted to post and it does pass code. If you go that route you will need 3 1/2" (if you used 4x4 posts)blocks between beam every 2' o.c. I would definatly go with the 18' lumber, because I have seen the beam split out at the bolt...

Bob

AtlanticWBConst. 06-20-2006 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bob the builder
Yes, I also see many decks done with beam bolted to post and it does pass code. If you go that route you will need 3 1/2" (if you used 4x4 posts)blocks between beam every 2' o.c. I would definatly go with the 18' lumber, because I have seen the beam split out at the bolt...

Bob

Bob, I guess it may be code in some places, but in my parts it isn't....

bob the builder 06-20-2006 10:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst.
Bob, I guess it may be code in some places, but in my parts it isn't....

I have a code book with commentary. Beam carriaged to bolt is described as good (enough). Beam on top of post is described as better.

It really just boils down to supporting a beam with corroding hardware or a rotting post. Which will out last the other. Hard to say what a.c.q. will do to the bolts without being time tested. So we should wait for it to fail before we say it isn't o.k. , I guess...

Bob

robertcdf 06-20-2006 11:16 PM

I like the idea of not just doing what is just barley "good enough" As I am sure we have all seen "good enough" before and it looks like crap and it falls apart after awhile.


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