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Melanie337 11-12-2007 11:30 AM

Beam Construction
 
1 Attachment(s)
I have attached a sketch (well...hopefully it worked), and I was hoping somebody could suggest the best configuration for making these two deck support beams, considering the positions of the concrete where the 6x6 posts will sit. They will be made of three 2x8s each, and the concrete piers are already there. Thank you.

Melanie337 11-13-2007 08:42 PM

Hey...nobody answered my question :(

AtlanticWBConst. 11-14-2007 05:00 AM

There is not much that can be said, as we do not know what you plan on supporting with your arrangement (deck size, dimensions, load, etc).

I will say this:
a.) Existing pier foundations are not necessarily constructed (dimensioned) to support the weight that a new construction arrangement requires.
b.) With that said, your posts appear to be too far apart. We prefer to space posts no more than 6'-0" apart.
c.) Based on your spacing arrangment, using 2x8's to fabricate the beams would not supply sufficient required strength.

Re-work things and bring your design to your local inspectional offices and get some feedback prior to applying for your building permit.
The inspector will most likely ask you to dig down next to a footing and confirm the depth per your regional code requirements, if you intend to re-use them.

Melanie337 11-14-2007 03:27 PM

Thanks atlantic...the inspector told us our concrete was okay for the job...and that we should make a 2x8 laminated beam (3 thick). We were originally going to go with two 2x10 but they said we needed three 2x8. Now we are wondering the most preferred way to build up that beam. Some posts are 6 feet apart, some are 8...and one set is almost 10. You've got me worried :eek: ...are we not okay at 8 or 10 feet with three 2x8? The charts we've looked at seemed to indicate we were okay. Thanks again!!!!

Melanie337 11-14-2007 05:59 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Hey Atlantic....found this photo in one of your other posts. This is beautiful. Can you tell me (1) how the posts are fastened to the beam...and (2) what is the rule on cutting the beam at an angle on the end (really looks good that way)? Thanks again!! M:thumbsup:
PS - Still hoping to use three 2x8 for our beam.

AtlanticWBConst. 11-14-2007 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Melanie337 (Post 73903)
Hey Atlantic....found this photo in one of your other posts. This is beautiful. Can you tell me (1) how the posts are fastened to the beam...and (2) what is the rule on cutting the beam at an angle on the end (really looks good that way)? Thanks again!! M:thumbsup:
PS - Still hoping to use three 2x8 for our beam.

Hi,

1.) They are fastened to the beam with Wide "L" brackets. The picture is older, we now try to incorporate Bolts into the attaching method, when we can. Code requires "Mechanical Fastening" of posts to beams. That means bolts and/or brackets.

2.) There is no rule for cutting the beam ends. It is for esthetic Reasons.

Good Luck on your project.

Melanie337 11-14-2007 09:48 PM

Thanks!! M:thumbup:

The Home Doc 11-17-2007 07:02 PM

Hello All,

One other thing to consider is where the construction is taking place geographically. Up in New England you have to account for the snow load that we don't have to worry about down here in the South.

Codes vary drastically from location to location. They should spell it out for you exactly how to attach the beams to the posts, what spans you can run with your beams/joists, handrail heights, rise/run of steps, etc. We are required to use (2) 5/8" galvanized bolts through the beam and post here in NC. The code allows you to span up to 10' with a (2) 2x10 beam either sandwiched or on either side of the post with blocking in the middle. The only real safe bet is to build off of what the inspector tells you to do. The inspector knows that you aren't a contractor/builder and takes that into consideration when he explains things to you. They may also have helpful cheat sheets for you that are copied out of your state's residential building code, with the county/city's supplemental codes attached to it.

Talk to the inspector and build it the way he wants you to. Try to get along with him as well as you can, as he will be the one that passes/fails your construction. The better your relationship, the less stress you will encounter.

Hope this helps,
Dan


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