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Old 05-29-2007, 08:01 PM   #1
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bathroom framing


I'm redoing the partitioning walls that make up my bathroom and two closets (represented by the red lines).

When framing new walls, what is the standard measurement of x for a small bathroom encorporating a standard bathtub?

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Old 05-29-2007, 08:21 PM   #2
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I believe standard tub length is 60" wall-to-wall, so stud to stud.

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Old 05-29-2007, 08:22 PM   #3
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If your trying to determine the dimension to it's smallest...you'd be best off to purchase or go online to see what the actual rough in dimensions are. I believe the most common measurement is 60".
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:33 PM   #4
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bathroom framing


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Originally Posted by johnny331 View Post
I'm redoing the partitioning walls that make up my bathroom and two closets (represented by the red lines).

When framing new walls, what is the standard measurement of x for a small bathroom encorporating a standard bathtub?
Like windows, you really need to have the tub you plan on using picked out prior to doing any of your framing for dimensions. Then frame the area to suite the tub size.
Now-a-days, tubs can range in size dimensions, especially whirl pool styles. As is the current trend with kitchens, people are putting more thought and design into their bathrooms.
When you determine your actual tub model and dimensions, you should allow 1/4" space on top of whatever the actual tub length is.
You then split this measurement to 1/8" space on each end when setting the tub into place.
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:50 PM   #5
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Ok, well I do have my tub already, just need to pick it up. So the tub simply sits stud to stud, plus 1/4" like you said atlantic? I think it was 62". I just didn't know if drywall or anything came into play in the measurements.
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:54 PM   #6
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You probably wouldn't want to use drywall around the tub unless you're putting a waterproof membrane over it (especially if there's a shower involved)... I personally don't even like using greenboard which is common around our neck of the woods...
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:58 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by johnny331 View Post
Ok, well I do have my tub already, just need to pick it up. So the tub simply sits stud to stud, plus 1/4" like you said atlantic? I think it was 62". I just didn't know if drywall or anything came into play in the measurements.
Hi,
If you already have the tub, you may be able to get it in there with 3/16" extra. I shy away from saying allow 1/8" space and splitting 1/16" on each end because of lumber variations. (Studs that are not completely straight or slightly bowed)
That is why I state 1/4". It is pretty much the industry standard in new construction, especially because studs can dry and bow between new framing and plumbing installation.

As far as the drywall, it ALWAYS goes over/above the tub or shower unit.

Also, when it comes to drywall, I would not even recommend ''Moisture Resistant'' sheetrock (AKA green board) as it is completely useless for wet environments (it's outdated).
Look into ''Densamor'' around the tub. If installing tile, use a cementitious backer board like ''Durock'' or ''Permabase'', etc ....

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 05-29-2007 at 09:03 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 05-30-2007, 09:43 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by johnny331 View Post
Ok, well I do have my tub already, just need to pick it up. So the tub simply sits stud to stud, plus 1/4" like you said atlantic? I think it was 62". I just didn't know if drywall or anything came into play in the measurements.
Johnny,

Where I'm from, a standard 5' tub the rough opening in between those walls are always 60-1/4".

Check with your plumber.
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Old 05-30-2007, 10:33 AM   #9
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The documentation that comes with your tub should give you the dimensions for the rough opening.

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