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MikeKy55 07-14-2013 05:38 PM

Bath exhaust venting
 
1 Attachment(s)
Attached is a photo of the vent tubing from my master bath in the attic area. Note it comes off the fan, goes up and over a cross brace and then it was looped back up and attached to the vent in the roof. When we moved here 4 years ago it was off and laying as it is in the picture. I never took the time to walk the rafters over to it and reconnect it to the roof vent. Well in Dec we had the roof replaced because of hail damage. The roofers hooked it back up when they did the roof. Today I noticed a water stain on the ceiling in the bedroom below this vent. I went up in the attic and this is what I found. The hose was off again and laying down on the insulation. My theory is either one of two things occurred. 1.) rain water blew back in the vent tube and the weight of the water pulled the tubing off the vent and spilled the water onto the ceiling below? 2.) is it possible condensation had collected in the hose causing it to pull off? (cool moist air from bathroom in the hose)3.) Was it simply the heat in the attic great enough to cause the tape to release and let it fall off?

Thoughts if you please? Should I leave it off and let the air vent into the attic? or put it back on and perhaps run some small screws into the vent (through the hose) so it can't slip off? Secondly, should I re-route that hose so it doesn't loop up over the cross brace?

Thanks in advance.
Mike

Canarywood1 07-14-2013 06:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeKy55 (Post 1215867)
Attached is a photo of the vent tubing from my master bath in the attic area. Note it comes off the fan, goes up and over a cross brace and then it was looped back up and attached to the vent in the roof. When we moved here 4 years ago it was off and laying as it is in the picture. I never took the time to walk the rafters over to it and reconnect it to the roof vent. Well in Dec we had the roof replaced because of hail damage. The roofers hooked it back up when they did the roof. Today I noticed a water stain on the ceiling in the bedroom below this vent. I went up in the attic and this is what I found. The hose was off again and laying down on the insulation. My theory is either one of two things occurred. 1.) rain water blew back in the vent tube and the weight of the water pulled the tubing off the vent and spilled the water onto the ceiling below? 2.) is it possible condensation had collected in the hose causing it to pull off? (cool moist air from bathroom in the hose)3.) Was it simply the heat in the attic great enough to cause the tape to release and let it fall off?

Thoughts if you please? Should I leave it off and let the air vent into the attic? or put it back on and perhaps run some small screws into the vent (through the hose) so it can't slip off? Secondly, should I re-route that hose so it doesn't loop up over the cross brace?

Thanks in advance.
Mike


Don't let it vent into the attic,get a worm drive clamp to fit the hose and reconnect to the vent,and that hose looks to be a little long,cut it to size while your at it.

MikeKy55 07-14-2013 06:31 PM

Should I re-route it? straight across and then up to the vent?

TarheelTerp 07-14-2013 06:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeKy55 (Post 1215867)
When we moved here 4 years ago it was off and laying as it is in the picture.
Should I leave it off and let the air vent into the attic?

Vent humid and smelly air outside.
Use/add STEEL vent materials for rigidity.
Support as needed.

jaydevries 07-14-2013 06:37 PM

i have drained exhaust vent pipes with 4 gallons of water before due to condensation. the hose can not have a dip in it or it gives a spot for te condensation to build up

BigDon 07-14-2013 10:30 PM

I haven't done Code inspections since 2008, so take this with a grain of salt cause my rememberer is a little rusty!

I believe that vent duct has to be smooth walled and needs to run directly the the roof outlet. It also must be supported. You never want a dip in your exhaust duct.

oh'mike 07-14-2013 10:55 PM

Up here we need to insulate the duct to prevent excess condensation---I do not know how cold you get down there, but insulating might be wise---

md2lgyk 07-15-2013 08:22 AM

Would it be possible to reroute the vent through a side wall of the house? I am really not a fan of bathroom, dryer, or range hood vents that go through the roof.

MikeKy55 07-15-2013 09:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1216018)
Up here we need to insulate the duct to prevent excess condensation---I do not know how cold you get down there, but insulating might be wise---

Mike, I don't think we had more than a dozen days below freezing last winter. Thanks

rtoni 07-17-2013 09:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeKy55 (Post 1216163)
Mike, I don't think we had more than a dozen days below freezing last winter. Thanks

That's an easy winter but still a dozen opportunities for condensation - even a little bit of water is more than what you want in your attic space - or anywhere in the envelope for that matter. For a couple $ you can get a sleeve to cover the duct, or even replace with an insulated flex duct prepackaged, done in 5 minutes and you don't have to think about it any more.

Or better yet, as others have suggested, lose that long flex hose and go with a rigid duct - you have an easy short run to the vent and lots of space to work there - take advantage.

In my old house, even a short run of flex pipe had a dip in it, and collected enough water to start dumping back into the fan housing and onto the floor. Don't leave any low spots for moisture to collect.

Whatever you do, make sure you're not dumping that bath air into the attic.

firehawkmph 07-18-2013 09:36 AM

+1 on the smooth metal ductwork and insulated sleeve. Even though you don't get much below freezing weather, you will still get condensation when the air outside is cooler than the air inside. Run it straight across and then up. Also the fan will work better with smooth wall pipe, less friction loss. Plus once you hook up the metal pipe to your roof vent, with screws, it won't fall off.
Mike Hawkins:)

rtoni 07-18-2013 03:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 1216154)
Would it be possible to reroute the vent through a side wall of the house? I am really not a fan of bathroom, dryer, or range hood vents that go through the roof.

+1. I did that on my current place - could have gone @ 5 feet right up to a roof vent but chose to go @ 12' across to a gable end vent instead. A bit more materials and a bit more effort (tight attic space) and a bit more pipe to push the air through, but the fan I used easily accomplishes this, and it was worth the effort IMHO. The vent works great all year. We can easily get a couple feet of or more snow on the roof in winter, add in the fact that it's often just occasional use (sometimes we're only there weekends) so the snow can build up, and the exhaust might have to plow through a lot of snow before the room is venting properly. Also it's one less thing poking through the roof deck which doesn't hurt. Not sure this matters as much to the OP down in Ky, but sometimes the end wall approach is a good idea if you have the option.


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