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Old 11-06-2009, 01:17 PM   #1
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


Looking to start finishing my basement but I noticed a small amount of moisture coming up the wall along the concrete floor wall joint. No puddle, just darker concrete. Only in two spots a few feet from each other. ( 3/4 of the basemnt is still covered with builders insulation and studs.)

It's a three year old home with sub-pump that runs quite a bit. Run-off water is pretty well controlled. No problems with moisture through the walls or floors... just the joint.

I've read two ways to fix the floor/wall joint:

-"by opening it up and packing it with hydraulic cement "

"I would clean out the cracks and install a urethane caulk. That will allow movement between the surfaces but maintain a waterproof bond. Attepmting to seal that with a rigid material like cement will never work. Those surfaces move in different ways at different times. "


Pro's/con's/comments about either? Does opening up to use hydraulic cement mean cutting the floor slab a few inches around the perimeter first?


Any help is greatly appreciated!


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Last edited by fubar79; 11-06-2009 at 01:21 PM.
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Old 11-06-2009, 06:05 PM   #2
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


Third option I guess is getting someone like Crack Doctor although it seems pretty minor. I think I'll head to the big box stores and see what they have on the shelves.

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Old 11-07-2009, 07:11 PM   #3
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


I would first start by inspecting the grade around the fondation of the house. Also check the gutters and make sure that they are either draining into tiles or that they are discharging the water away fron the house. Also make sure that the grade is sloping away from the foundation and that there are now holes left from moving plantings or something else. Often if there is an area where the water is draining back toward the house, the water will find the easiest place to releave the hydrolic pressure, usually joints in the concrete are the weakest spot.

If the grade and gutters are fine, then I would concentrate on the Hydrolic cement repair kits.
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Old 11-07-2009, 07:27 PM   #4
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


Hey Rob, thanks for the reply.

The grade is fine. New home, and they have crazy swells away from the house. No plants, bushes or anything. On that side of the house, the drains run into a "big-o" that I burried, and drain at the end of the driveway.

Everything has dried up since I removed the studs/insulation/VB (24hours). I'm going to chisel out a bit of the cove, then fill it in with some hydraulic cement. Hopefully it's as simple as that and then i'm back to building as appose to ripping out. But i'm glad I found it now, rather then later!
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Old 11-07-2009, 07:33 PM   #5
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


The main thing is to try to make the grove deep enough to give the hydraulic cement something to bond to. The cement expands as it cures, this is how it is able to withstand the pressure, so make sure that there is enough surface to let it get a good crip. When done correctly it has been very impressive fore me. Good luck.
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Old 11-07-2009, 08:24 PM   #6
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Thanks for the advice. I will give it a try Monday when I have a few hours to tackle it.
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Old 03-18-2015, 04:01 PM   #7
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


Quote:
Originally Posted by fubar79 View Post
Thanks for the advice. I will give it a try Monday when I have a few hours to tackle it.
Hi fubar79,

I got the same issue in my basement yesterday that you had it before. Did hydraulic cement work?

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Old 03-18-2015, 04:29 PM   #8
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


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hi fubar79,

i got the same issue in my basement yesterday that you had it before. Did hydraulic cement work?

Regards
11-07-2009
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Old 03-18-2015, 07:45 PM   #9
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


' fubar ' isn't exactly descriptive however what was tried didn't work then & still won't,,, using hydraulic's just fooling oneself,,, yes, damning up a leaking area MAY stop water in that spot,,, the leak will be diverted to another weak area of the wall/footer area tho,,, either that OR the water will fill cells where you can't see the damage til it gets VERY expensive to repair
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Old 03-18-2015, 08:02 PM   #10
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


I wonder if that's the same Fubar that I read in the obit pages... seems he drowned in his basement....... just kidding

By far the most effective method in allready established construction is to divert water externally.

( However, I have used hydraulic cement and Drylock to mitugate moisture invasion with OK/limited success.)

But, by far ... don't count on blocking water... divert it by any/all means.

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Old 03-18-2015, 08:41 PM   #11
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


In our area there are builders that take the most economical approach on every home they build. - It is cheaper and more profitable in the end.

They build every home (usually split or full basements) and always install both interior and exterior drain tile during construction when it is "dirt cheap" and a huge selling point. They have not had problem with the classic joint between the slab and the foundation wall that is built on a strip footing and a slab slab poured later.

That drain tile eliminates the error of the landscapers that do not pay enough attention to surface drainage since it removes the water AND reduces the hydrostatic pressure on the walls and pressure under the floating slab.

If you are facing an existing problem, interior drain tile is the way to go because installing an exterior drain tile becomes almost impossible with the existing soil, steps, sidewalks, driveways, attached garages, AC units, etc. It reduces the pressure and gets rid of the water when it gets down into the soil. The pump discharge can be directs to suit the individual home and site. - Waterproofing an existing home can be costly, but worth it if you gain dry livable space.

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Old 03-18-2015, 08:53 PM   #12
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


I think Fubar's biggest issue,(in 2009) was an "oh by the way" there were no plants or landscaping on that side of the home, like it was a good thing. That was most likely what was causing the issue. It would be interesting to see what Parsa has to say about his/her issue and exterior drainage/landscaping.
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Old 03-19-2015, 08:16 AM   #13
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


I am going to think about mobile wall panels, plug in electric connectors and moving the furnace into a concrete tub.
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Old 03-19-2015, 09:50 AM   #14
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Basement wall/floor joint leak


as i recall, there were 3 sons,,, the 1st was named snafu, the 2nd was tarfu, & the 3rd was fubar

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