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Old 11-28-2011, 05:22 PM   #1
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


Hi,
I've been looking on the web for information and found this site...great resource! I have 3 questions so far!

When I eventually stud out the basement, we will be hanging a wall mounted LCD TV somewhere....we won't know until after the studding I would guess.

Anyway, to make life easier I was considering putting some horizontal 2x6's or plywood blocking around the entire perimeter, in the likely event that there is no stud where the Mrs. finally wants the TV :-)
->Does this sound reasonable?

->THAT being said, if I am going to do blocking anyhow....are there any benefits over wood versus steel studs?

It seems like blocking was the biggest issue with steel studs, well that, and cold-soaked metal studs!

And speaking of cold metal studs behind drywall....
->would duct tape or maybe posterboard backing tape (the thicker foam tape you find in a hobby store)
be effective in making a "thermal" block between the studs and drywall?

I'm planning on 2" blue foam board against the wall and maybe roxul between the studs.

Thoughts???

Thanks,
Max
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Old 11-28-2011, 07:04 PM   #2
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


i frame both with wood and steel, personally i hate steel stud,

it has very little holding power, if the wall gets hit by something large and heavy the stud will buckle and needs to be replaced outside corners especially... some will argue its better, teh only thing good about it is that its straight and is galvanized.. you can install wood blocking in a steel stud wall however in a large scale application there is metal flatstock that gets used fastening cabinets and other such things to via screws.... this flatstock gets screwed directly to the edge of the studs before drywall goes on

wood framing, though it can rot and does have "character" such as crowning and what not. wood has much more holding power than steel studs do.. you drive a wood screw into a stud and its gonna hold, drive a screw into a steel stud and the stud can very easily strip out. you can shape the wood, glue it, screw it nail to it... you cant nail to steel stud when it comes to trim, you either have to install wood blocking which takes forever or rely on glue and "stitch nailing" trim. which eventually will lose its hold
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Old 11-29-2011, 08:09 PM   #3
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


Your steel studs won’t be cold from the concrete wall behind them. They should stay at room temperature unless you forget the sill sealer (air/thermal/capillary break) under the bottom plate. They will act as an effective heat sink otherwise. Code requires you air seal the drywall at the bottom because it is your thermal/air barrier from the conditioned space. http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par022.htm Be aware the lightweight box store s. studs probably don’t have enough galvanized coating on them if using with the new p.t. wood. Remember to fire-block the new wall at the top from the joist cavities and every 10’ horizontally as per minimum safety code: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par031.htm Air seal the drywall, f.b. the rim joists, and no gaps behind the blue foam or studs: http://joneakes.com/jons-fixit-database/743

Be sure to have egress as the Building Inspector will look for this at signing off of your permit.

Gary
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Old 11-30-2011, 08:56 AM   #4
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


Planning the space makes more sense to me then blocking all the walls. How hard is it to decide where things go?
I personally like steel studs. Easy to use, light weight, all straight and I like the sparks.
I do keep the farm animals out of the room so the walls remain intact. Kirk's right about that.
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Old 11-30-2011, 04:19 PM   #5
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


the debate between wood and metal studs can go on forever. personally,I prefer metal. Kirk, is right about being hit with something heavy, but metal is much easier to fix/repair than wood in that case. if the damage is only to one or two studs? it's simple to cut the drywall out and sister metal studs to get it straight. than to tear wall out from floor to ceiling to replace wood studs. I do suggest putting wood studs by doors /windows for nailing.

once you're framed in you can tell where you need blocking for TV. there is a rolled edge on inside of metal studs, a couple passes with circular saw 1/8" with 1/4" deep will allow blocking to be installed flush with face of studs. even 25 gauge studs from home depot or Lowe's, will hold your TV. just don't over tighten screws in mounting bracket as will pull into drywall. other trimming can be done,baseboard etc. with trim screws and will hold. when you screw drywall on, start screwing at top or bottom, where studs are fastened and are tight to the track squarely. don't try to start at easier waist level! as studs try to twist, unless you can hold them firmly. I've built hospitals, college dormitories Kmart stores, hotels with hundreds of rooms, even Gore plants with metal studs, I've yet to be called back cause a TV or anything else has fallen,

good luck
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Old 11-30-2011, 04:31 PM   #6
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


just to point out, the "flat stock" i think you called it (we just get 8in X 10ft strips of 18ga sheetmetal from the duct guys) is fine to hang cabinets on, i've hung miles of cabinets with it, but i'm not so sure i'd want to hang a tv from it. generally we use 3/4 plywood or 2xWhatever for bathroom grab rail and any TV mounting blocking, just to get a better grip. like someone said earlier, with wood blocking, you just have to cut a channel for the lip of the stud.

also keep in mind that 2x4's are 1 1/2 x 3 1/2, and metal studs are 1 1/4 x 3 5/8
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Old 11-30-2011, 06:49 PM   #7
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


like someone said earlier, with wood blocking, you just have to cut a channel for the lip of the stud.

correction! cutting Chanel wont work, as it'll have to go all way through the blocking. you just snip the rolled edge and straighten it out flat with face of metal stud.

sorry my mistake, speaking before thinking it through

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Old 11-30-2011, 09:19 PM   #8
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


Quote:
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like someone said earlier, with wood blocking, you just have to cut a channel for the lip of the stud.

correction! cutting Chanel wont work, as it'll have to go all way through the blocking. you just snip the rolled edge and straighten it out flat with face of metal stud.

sorry my mistake, speaking before thinking it through

coupe
no, you just set the depth gauge on your skilsaw to 1/4-3/8 of an inch and cut a line about 1 1/8 off one side of the blocking. i work in commercial constuction, and work with metal studs 90 percent of the time. cutting the stud takes more time than cutting the wood.
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Old 12-01-2011, 05:58 PM   #9
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


cool thanks guys....do teenagers = farm animals in the damage department? lol
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Old 12-01-2011, 06:04 PM   #10
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


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cool thanks guys....do teenagers = farm animals in the damage department? lol
A herd of stampeding cattle will never come close to a house full of teenagers.
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Old 12-01-2011, 07:03 PM   #11
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


someone was talking about the steel rusting in another thread, can this happen?

I was going to put trex deck or composite decking instead of a PT plate, will composite decking grow mold against the concrete?

do I google drywall suppliers for material vs homedepot's stuff? what gauge is good for a basement perimeter wall?

thanks again!
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Old 12-01-2011, 08:06 PM   #12
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


I have used steel studs in my own basement as well as many commercial jobs I have helped build. They work great when done properly. Yes they will corrode and rust if there is water present. That issue needs to be addressed before wall building is started. Wood will grow mold and rot, so there is one big difference that I saw. I can carry 10 steel studs down my stairs at a time, but not wood. Steel is definitely straighter and faster once you get the hang of it. And you need to use the right screws for your drywall. Fine thread screws for light gague studs, and fine thread with a drill point for the heavier gague studs.
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Old 12-01-2011, 08:52 PM   #13
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


when someone says with "water present" what does that exactly mean in regards to rust and metal studs?
There is no standing water but not sure how high water table is.
i guess it's a typical basement in a newer home with poured walls. it doesn't seem musty to me.

Will the higher humidity in a basement, in general, be enough for corrosion? or are you saying IF the humidity is high enough to corrode metal, it will be high enough to mold wood....a bad situation however one goes?
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Old 12-01-2011, 09:37 PM   #14
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


When I referred to water being present, I meant standing water. You could have a wall leak, or have an area like a kitchen sink or bath tub or vanity where water often drains to the floor and is not mopped up right away or runs under flooring, cabinets, etc. If it reaches the metal studs, they will eventually corrode and or rust. High humidity will not rust through a stud very quickly. It will , however grow mold and mildew on wood or drywall.
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Old 12-01-2011, 09:52 PM   #15
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Basement and Steel or metal stud question


Cross bracing and adding supports to keep the walls stronger can be a good thing. I have always used tin snips to cut the studs nothing more...sorry no sparks! But it does allow to put bracing from cement wall to the studs as steel is stronger with drywall on both sides.
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