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Old 04-04-2011, 04:41 PM   #1
dnt
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Basement Lumber


I am getting ready to frame the walls in my basement. Does someone have an easy way to estimate the number of studs I will need? Also, what type/size lumber should be used on the bottom and top plates?

Specifically:
  • How to estimate the number of studs?
  • Type/size of lumber for bottom plate?
  • Type/size of lumber for top plate?

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Old 04-04-2011, 04:46 PM   #2
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Basement Lumber


Quote:
Originally Posted by dnt View Post
  • How to estimate the number of studs?
  • Type/size of lumber for bottom plate?
  • Type/size of lumber for top plate?
Studs - estimate one stud per lineal foot
Bottom plate - 2x4 pressure treated as a plate on the concrete floor. 2x4 spruce as a shoe laid on top of the PT
Top plate - 2x4 spruce

Bathroom plumbing walls - 2x6 plate, shoe and top plate. (allows for 3" pipes )

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Old 04-04-2011, 04:51 PM   #3
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Thanks for the quick reply.
Two questions:
Why spruce, just curious?
What do you mean by a shoe?
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Old 04-04-2011, 05:05 PM   #4
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Spruce is the standard framing lumber up here in the Northeast.
Other parts of the country use different materials. Doug fir, southern yellow pine, hemlock etc. Whatever is standard framing lumber in your area is fine.

Shoe - This is one of those items that one calls it this and another calls it that.

I refer to plates as the last horizontal member of a wall that gets attached to a floor or a ceiling.

Shoe is the horizontal member on the bottom of a wall.

So in your case, a shoe will lay on top of your pressure treated plate.

Now just to confuse it some more.......
Some people choose to use the pressure treated plate as the bottom of the wall and eliminate the shoe.
I don't like to do this because the PT is a lot more difficult to nail and manage when it's fastened to a bunch of studs.

I layout all my Pressure treated plates on the floor. After double checking my dimensions and positioning, I either shoot or Tapcon the plates to the concrete.
I use construction adhesive along with the fasteners. This helps keep the wall firmly in place using less fasteners.

Then I build my standard framing wall on top of the plate. I can now fasten through the shoe directly into the plate.

Easy, huh?
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