Basement I Beam Set Too High - Building & Construction - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-18-2012, 04:38 PM   #16
Member
 
GBrackins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Posts: 2,877
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

Basement I beam set too high


if the top of the 2x4 on the steel beam is level with the top of the 2x4 on top of the foundation then it should be level. that is if your floor joists set on top of each 2x4 plate, or am I missing something?

Advertisement

__________________
Gary

"You get what you pay for, and sometimes free costs more!"
GBrackins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 04:40 PM   #17
Member
 
GBrackins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Posts: 2,877
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

Basement I beam set too high


have you put a level of the bottom of the floor joists?
__________________
Gary

"You get what you pay for, and sometimes free costs more!"
GBrackins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 04:52 PM   #18
Framing Contractor
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 1,102
Rewards Points: 516
Default

Basement I beam set too high


Measuring from the floor means nothing. Many basement floors are sloped or just not perfectly level. A string as a reference from end to end is the only thing that will tell you if your theory is correct. Even then, you will have trouble if you try to make everything perfect now.
sixeightten is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to sixeightten For This Useful Post:
mae-ling (10-18-2012)
Old 10-18-2012, 04:53 PM   #19
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 15
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Basement I beam set too high


Basement I beam set too high-1.jpg

look at that... i was wondering why the darn collumns werent painted. I know the pic isnt the greatest but i think that is it. The poles nedd to be shortened.
Jlynn024 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 05:00 PM   #20
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 15
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Basement I beam set too high


I agree with you on not trying to make everything perfect. Chances are if i do make any kind of adjustment it will crack all the square corners in the entire house. I guess im going to have to deal with the hump in the floor for now. I just wonder at what point i should try and make an adjustment. Are the colums used to support the I beam designed to be adjusted? I know they usually have two ways to adjust them but are you supposed to "just set it and foget it" and not make adjustments through out the years?
Jlynn024 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 05:09 PM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: B.C. Canada
Posts: 2,055
Rewards Points: 1,030
Default

Basement I beam set too high


Depends where you are located and the type of column.
Do yours have any threads at the top or bottom or are they a solid post?

Last edited by mae-ling; 10-18-2012 at 05:18 PM.
mae-ling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 05:12 PM   #22
Member
 
GBrackins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Posts: 2,877
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

Basement I beam set too high


there are typically three types:

1. lally columns (thin steel wall columns filled with concrete) that are cut to length
2. standard steel pipe columns that are cut to length
3. adjustable steel columns (screw type adjustor at one end of the column)

I would say with a steel plate welded on top of the column which is welded to the bottom of the steel beam they should be standard steel pipe columns (do not see an adjustment at top, could be at bottom though). welding to lally columns typically doesn't do to well because of spaulding of the concrete inside the lally column.

if you see no screw adjustment on them they are probably fixed.

Again from what I see based upon your saying the two 2x4 plates are level then everything should be level, unless there are notches in one end of the floor joists.

put a level on the bottom of the joists, this will let you know

Good luck!
__________________
Gary

"You get what you pay for, and sometimes free costs more!"
GBrackins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 05:42 PM   #23
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 15
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Basement I beam set too high


I ran a rope end to end on the beam with a 2x4 spacer on each end. The result is the beam is actually bowed from the house settling and the support Collums never being adjusted. There is no way to adjust its just a solid pipe. So what I believe I have is the Collums are actually pushing up as the rest of the house has settled. Based upon what iv measured with the rope going end to end on the beam is about a 2 3/4 upward bow minus the 1 1/2 two by four which leaves me with an 1 1/4 of total house settlement. Does that sound like a lot? The house was built in 1965
Jlynn024 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 05:59 PM   #24
Framing Contractor
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 1,102
Rewards Points: 516
Default

Basement I beam set too high


That is quite a bit. With that kind of movement, there probably are some serious cracks in the foundation walls as well. Support columns are not meant to be adjusted by homeowners later. They are threaded to allow for adjustment when the beam is installed. We generally put the threaded end down so that a well meaning homeowner does not attempt it later.
sixeightten is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 06:14 PM   #25
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 15
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Basement I beam set too high


Got ya I was unsure if you were supposed to adjust them. So guess I'll live with this humped up floor. I live about a mile off mississippi river by saint Louis in a low water table area. This area is prone to basement issues. An excess of an inch is a lot though. There were some cracked walls but they were repaired and are still holding up decently. I believe the house may still be settling too. Thats why I wonder if I need to adjust this thing or ride it out until something more other than this hump appears.
Jlynn024 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 07:26 PM   #26
journeyman carpenter
 
woodworkbykirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: nova scotia canada
Posts: 2,779
Rewards Points: 174
Default

Basement I beam set too high


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackofall1 View Post
Hello and Welcome Jlynn024, to the best darn DIY'r site on the web.

Sounds like whoever built this place forgot about doubling the bottom plate.

I would say that lowering the center beam would not be a DIY'r job, there is just too much at risk.

Mark

doubling hte bottom plate???? how would that affect it.. bottom plates dont have to be doubled. top plates do to lock walls together at corners. the only time bottom plates get doubled is when the wrong size studs are sent and you need the extra 1 1/2" so the studs sent can be used
woodworkbykirk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 07:51 PM   #27
Concrete & Masonry
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,796
Rewards Points: 2,144
Default

Basement I beam set too high


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jlynn024 View Post
I ran a rope end to end on the beam with a 2x4 spacer on each end. The result is the beam is actually bowed from the house settling and the support Collums never being adjusted. There is no way to adjust its just a solid pipe. So what I believe I have is the Collums are actually pushing up as the rest of the house has settled. Based upon what iv measured with the rope going end to end on the beam is about a 2 3/4 upward bow minus the 1 1/2 two by four which leaves me with an 1 1/4 of total house settlement. Does that sound like a lot? The house was built in 1965
A "rope" could easily sag that much, unless you have a nice strong thin line and a ton of pressure on it.................

My advise would to be to find a good mason line and clamp it on one end and have a helper hold it extremely tight on the other end while you measure the deflection to get a true measurement..........
jomama45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 08:41 PM   #28
journeyman carpenter
 
woodworkbykirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: nova scotia canada
Posts: 2,779
Rewards Points: 174
Default

Basement I beam set too high


or a laser line its way more accurate
woodworkbykirk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 08:44 PM   #29
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: B.C. Canada
Posts: 2,055
Rewards Points: 1,030
Default

Basement I beam set too high


Agree a rope could sag, best to use a mason or string line.
Attach it at each end, really hard to hold it tight.
A trick to tighten a string line is to take it and but the loop on a nail at the start, on the other end take and loop it around you finger them do a circle with your finger 4 or 5 times causing it to twist on itself. Put this loop over a nail then pull the string on itself and tighten it then wrap on the nail a few times.

Maybe the house has settled but more likely the floor/pads have heaved where the posts are.
mae-ling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 08:44 PM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: B.C. Canada
Posts: 2,055
Rewards Points: 1,030
Default

Basement I beam set too high


Quote:
Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk View Post
or a laser line its way more accurate
Not every home owner has one and we built houses way before they came out.

Advertisement

mae-ling is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
basement , crack , floor , i beam , lower


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OSB Stronger than Plywood? Weathermaker01 Flooring 15 12-22-2012 10:06 AM
Max horizontal load on vertical basement support beam supa Building & Construction 8 02-27-2011 02:51 PM
New basement in high water table eds1618 Building & Construction 11 09-30-2009 07:12 PM
Tranferring load to basement beam and lally column cooperwd Building & Construction 3 08-17-2009 11:14 AM
i beam in basement, notched joist component Building & Construction 1 03-18-2008 02:47 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts