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Jj375 09-28-2011 03:45 PM

Basement Water
 
Last winter I started framing the exterior walls of the basement. This is an old house with cinder block walls but has been dry as long as I've lived here. (15 yrs.). I have rigid foam on the cinder block then a gap of about 5" to the studded wall. The base plate is pressure treated and I was planning on using dry-core for the subfloor. With the recent heavy rains in the north east , we are on pace to surpass 100 yr old records, I'm now getting seepage from the wall. It is not enough to puddle but I'm wondering if this will be ok or do the walls need to be exposed to dry. I don't want mold and now I'm second guessing myself.

stadry 09-29-2011 06:55 AM

you will eventually get water as leaks don't ' heal ' by themselves,,, the absolute best way to dry the walls is by full-depth excavation & waterproofing the OUTSIDE walls,,, you may also need an exterior sump & discharge pump IF you can't use a gravity discharge - good luck !

Jj375 09-29-2011 07:55 AM

Outside excavation is impossible I live in the city and the house next to me is literally right next to me. I'm only getting water after a year with record rain and only during rainfalls that give us over 3-4" in a short time period. This is not the norm

stadry 09-30-2011 04:32 AM

then you have 3 choices - 1, install a well-point system; 2, install what many call a ' french drain ' in your basement; or 3, live w/the leaks,,, had you originally bothered to list your location, wouldn't have wasted time on the previous reply,,, NOTHING else you can do will resolve this issue - think of your very fine bsmt as a ship's hull underwater which should make it easier for you,,, IF there were any coating you could apply inside, wouldn't water still be penetrating the wall anyway ?

Jj375 09-30-2011 08:14 AM

The leaking is not bad , what I guess I'm asking is if I get a little water every 20 yrs or so is it going to cause a problem behind the 2•4 walls. It's not enough to even puddle.

Jj375 09-30-2011 08:18 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Here are some pics.

stadry 09-30-2011 05:26 PM

you've been getting wtr for some time however just lately has it gotten bad enough to penetrate the rest of the wall,,, trust me - it won't be once every 20yrs - the leak volume WILL increase w/every rainstorm of consequence

Jj375 09-30-2011 05:47 PM

This is seven feet under grade , I do live on a hill , just had all my raingutters redone and all down spouts go to the back of the property (down hill side). Most people are getting water through the floor of the basement so I was hoping it is from the water table be so high from record rains. We had 20" of rain in September alone. It's only one corner of the basement and it's on the side of the house that is uphill, but it's graded so surface water dower run toward it.

stadry 10-01-2011 05:55 AM

' surface water dower run toward it ' pardon ? ? ? not aware of that word's meaning unless you mean ' dower rights ' but fail to understand how marriage contract/real property applies to your wet bsmt :huh:

sounds as if the leaking wtr's created some underground pathways, no ? part of the floor looks unfinished or uncoated/painted - what's the explanation ?

Jj375 10-01-2011 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jj375
This is seven feet under grade , I do live on a hill , just had all my raingutters redone and all down spouts go to the back of the property (down hill side). Most people are getting water through the floor of the basement so I was hoping it is from the water table be so high from record rains. We had 20" of rain in September alone. It's only one corner of the basement and it's on the side of the house that is uphill, but it's graded so surface water dower run toward it.

Dower = doesn't, little key board on phone always gets me.

Jj375 10-01-2011 08:44 AM

Have no idea why parts of the floor are painted and some aren't. It was that way when I bought the house 15 yrs ago.

Gary in WA 10-02-2011 04:48 PM

Where are you located?

The foam board may need to be 2" thick to stop/slow the moisture through the concrete wall, depending on location.
The joints need to be taped/foamed to stop any interior air from reaching the concrete.The stud wall needs to be directly in front of the foam to eliminate any convective loops there. The paper facing needs to be completely removed from the fiber insulation as vapor retarders do not help drying to the interior in a basement. The p.t. plate will wick water/moisture through it to mold on the second (untreated) plate above.

Gary

Jj375 10-02-2011 05:00 PM

I'm in northeast Pennsylvania.

Jj375 10-02-2011 05:08 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Here I have 2 1/2 " foam on the cinder block and the wall is tight against the footer. The moisture is minimal and only after a summer with record setting rains. If I take the paper off the insulation will this be ok?

Gary in WA 10-02-2011 07:18 PM

Yes, remove the paper facing. http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...ong-from-start
2" board is minimum for your area. The big gap between insulation will rob you of heat as you warm the wall; http://joneakes.com/jons-fixit-database/743

Insulate the rim joist with rigid foam and canned foam as you did the wall. http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...-at-rim-joist/

Gary


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