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Old 09-12-2011, 11:44 AM   #1
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Basement Ceiling Drywall


I am in the process of slowly finishing out the basement on my 1915 Bungalow.

For the walls I used 1/2" green drywall. My question is should I stay with the moisture resistant drywall on the ceilings or does it not matter?

The other question is would 1/2" be sufficient or am I truly better off going with 5/8" on the ceiling? I hear 5/8" helps hide waves and I do want it to look nice, but I realize with this old of a house, it's going to be a bit wavy no matter what.

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Old 09-12-2011, 05:04 PM   #2
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Basement Ceiling Drywall


1/2" is fine in most areas---5/8 " is best if the joist spacing is 24"--

Plan on sistering in some nailers to flatten out the waves---or add furring strips if you can spare the loss of height.

A few areas require 5'8" on ceilings to meet code--this is rare but you could find out if code requires it by conjuring up the local code on line--

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Old 09-12-2011, 10:31 PM   #3
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Basement Ceiling Drywall


Mike has a good idea of strapping to level the old joists. It will also reduce the on-center spacing to maximum per code, IBC, UBC or IRC; “Use of water-resistant gypsum backing board shall be permitted on ceilings where framing spacing does not exceed 12 inches (305 mm) on center for 1/2-inch-thick (12.7 mm) or 16 inches (406 mm) for 5/8-inch-thick (16 mm) gypsum board.” From; http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par013.htm


Gary

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Old 09-13-2011, 06:20 AM   #4
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Thanks Gary---I'll have to read that one---Mike---
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:09 AM   #5
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Basement Ceiling Drywall


Didn't really want the loss of height, but I have already added furring strips of 2x4's along most of the ceiling and will finish the rest soon. The main reason was I didn't want to notch the joists for the a/c lineset and I also didn't want to pay to have it moved. There were of course other obstructions, that was the major one though.

I don't recall if I went with 16" or 24" spacing of the furing strips. I'm thinking maybe 24". So based upon the info, if that is the case, I should go with non-moisture resist drywall 5/8" thick. Right?

The question that wasn't really answered though was would the moisture resitant drywall be best, being as it's in the basement? I could always add a 1"x2" nailer between the already installed furing strips.
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Old 09-13-2011, 07:53 PM   #6
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“I don't recall if I went with 16" or 24" spacing of the furing strips. I'm thinking maybe 24". So based upon the info, if that is the case, I should go with non-moisture resist drywall 5/8" thick. Right?” ---- or go with the “lightweight” drywall, ” if local code permits it there;
Ceiling thickness

"The question that wasn't really answered though was would the moisture-resistant drywall be best, being as it's in the basement?" ----- I would use regular drywall (50 perm) rather than water resistant (>25 perm) because it is more permeable to moisture. The concrete wall, wood wall, insulation and drywall all let moisture pass through to dry inside. You want foamboard glued and fastened to the concrete, joints taped, fire-blocking every 10' horizontally, top plate closed to the joist bays above, sill sealer under the bottom p.t. plate, no gaps behind insulation if f.g., air seal the drywall (ADA), no interior vapor retarders or barriers (poly), rim joists sealed from exterior air, according to BSC; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...gs?full_view=1

http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...insulation.pdf

Mike---- 4.2.7 here: http://nationalgypsum.com/products/..%5CFile%5C1046.pdf

Gary
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Old 09-13-2011, 10:22 PM   #7
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Gary, thanks for the response. I did a lot of reading on the walls and this is what I did. I used 1/2" rigid blue foam board glued to the concrete block walls. They had been pre-painted with masonry paint years ago. I then framed a wall, using p.t. lumber, didn't use sill sealer, because I've framed probably a dozen or two houses in my area and they never used it in basements, so didn't think about it. Probably not a bad idea. I did however, use spray foam insulation along all joints, couldn't find tape locally, so I left 1/4" gaps and foamed that along with all other seams even along the concrete to P.T. sill plate. I then used batt insulation in the stud bays over the foam. I did some fire blocking, but honestly didn't worry tons about it, because, well the rest of the house isn't fire blocked and I kind of figured what is the point really! Kind of like putting a band aid on a gun shot wound.....

For the rim joists, I used several layers of rigid foam, glued and stuck into the bay, then once several inches of foam insulation was in place horizontally and vertically, I then used batt insulation between most floor joists, if for no other reason than to help muffle sound transmission and it has helped. This basement area is right under my girls bedrooms and I don't want any TV/Musis/etc bothering them at night and vice versa.
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Old 09-14-2011, 09:33 PM   #8
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The canned foam at the p.t. plate will act as an air seal to keep conditioned air from reaching the colder concrete wall. A sill sealer there also acts as a capillary break to stop any water under the slab from wetting your framing: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code

It also acts as a thermal break to stop the heated wall from warming the slab and earth below it. Google (heat sink).
Wood framing touching concrete walls only need a vapor barrier strip between concrete/stud. http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...9_3_sec017.htm
I am surprised you have more concern of noise than fire-safety, perhaps because it is already built.... If there is an outlet fire at the left corner basement back wall, it could easily travel to the joist bays/along the gap at top plates to the other end of the house, go in to a bay there, across the house perpendicularly and surface in an upstairs wall or the attic. Please get an Electrical permit.
Rock wool is better than f.g. for noise, in my opinion. It is great for locating air pathways in the attic, when air-sealing same (by the black tracks).

Gary
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Old 09-14-2011, 10:13 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
I am surprised you have more concern of noise than fire-safety, perhaps because it is already built.... If there is an outlet fire at the left corner basement back wall, it could easily travel to the joist bays/along the gap at top plates to the other end of the house, go in to a bay there, across the house perpendicularly and surface in an upstairs wall or the attic. Please get an Electrical permit.
Rock wool is better than f.g. for noise, in my opinion. It is great for locating air pathways in the attic, when air-sealing same (by the black tracks).

Gary
Not sure I am more concerned about noise than fire safety, I have taken some precautions, it's just that these old houses weren't built with that in mind and I honestly, don't see where sticking a band-aid on a gun shot wound will help anything. My point being gaps in 1x sub-flooring, small gaps in flooring, balloon framing, etc... I've tried to seal off most passages from the framing to the joists, but there are lots of odd sized gaps. I may go back and see about cutting some drywall to stick in those area's that might still be in question as it is fire-resistant as well.

The electrical has all been done to code and I have even gone in and added wired and interconnected smoke detectors on all levels in about every room. I very much appreciate how fast these old houses go up in flames.

As for the rock wool, yes I realize it's much better, I just haven't found it conveinently, so I haven't used it. If I had the drywall up already, I would have used cellulose instead as I've started using it to insulate the exterior walls, which weren't/aren't insulated. I've even thought about using it in the areas which are hard to fire block, because it is very flame resistant.

I do like the idea of the seal sealer and will probably use it on the walls, which aren't up yet.
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Old 09-15-2011, 12:21 PM   #10
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Good to hear. Install blocking at floor level between studs. Install vertical blocking every 10' horizontally in the new wall, close-off the top plate to studs, do what you can. If plywood is over the gaped deck boards, no worries. Block any drop ceilings...... here is a very good guide, just in the next room: How to fireblock framing

Gary

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