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johnny331 07-05-2007 04:00 PM

basement beam supports
 
I have some general questions about my support beams. They are rusted and I plan to replace them all. I don't know what kind of footer is under them so I plan to replace those as well.

It's a 50 year old, single story ranch. Is a 20x20x8 footer alright?

Any special concrete I have to mix up for this?

I have a 40 foot span consisting of four 2x8's, is 8-foot support spacing ok?

concretemasonry 07-05-2007 04:12 PM

basement beam supports
 
If you are replcing the posts, use the same footings.

They have worked for 50 years, so they will not settle if the same load is on them. - Why tear up the floor and footings if you do not have to?

AtlanticWBConst. 07-05-2007 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by concretemasonry (Post 51692)
If you are replcing the posts, use the same footings.

They have worked for 50 years, so they will not settle if the same load is on them. - Why tear up the floor and footings if you do not have to?

Agreed

johnny331 07-05-2007 08:52 PM

Yeah I guess that makes total sense...

I only wondered about the footer because in one support, it looks like it has sunk maybe 1/4" into the slab.

What are the chances that there is no footer under there at all, is that like totally impossible? I'm finding that anything is possible as I tear into this house...

fhivinylwindows 07-05-2007 09:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnny331 (Post 51723)
Yeah I guess that makes total sense...

I only wondered about the footer because in one support, it looks like it has sunk maybe 1/4" into the slab.

What are the chances that there is no footer under there at all, is that like totally impossible? I'm finding that anything is possible as I tear into this house...

The soil under your slab is more than likely firm enough to hold up the slab that holds up your post. If your slab has big cracks all around where the post meet the concrete then you might want to think about footings, if not leave well enough alone.

johnny331 07-05-2007 09:07 PM

well, I know for a fact my slab is only maybe 2" thick, it isn't a standard, what, 4" slab?

There are no stress cracks, perhaps the pole could have been skim-coated around, and it just appears to have sunk. I don't know.

I think I'll just replace the poles and leave it be.

fhivinylwindows 07-05-2007 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnny331 (Post 51732)
well, I know for a fact my slab is only maybe 2" thick, it isn't a standard, what, 4" slab?

There are no stress cracks, perhaps the pole could have been skim-coated around, and it just appears to have sunk. I don't know.

I think I'll just replace the poles and leave it be.


If you are bored and are looking for a project inspect your cast iron drain pipes. During a remodel of my house (same age as yours) I found that most of my pipes were shot. The main vent pipe was leaking gas into my kitchen and bath.

johnny331 07-05-2007 11:27 PM

heh believe me im anything but bored with this house!

and replacing all the iron drains with pvc IS on the list, gotta get the exterior done first though. same goes for the galvanized water lines. All my walls are exposed right now, so it wont be too tough. Oh, add new electrical to the list.

AtlanticWBConst. 07-06-2007 07:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnny331 (Post 51732)
well, I know for a fact my slab is only maybe 2" thick, it isn't a standard, what, 4" slab?

There are no stress cracks, perhaps the pole could have been skim-coated around, and it just appears to have sunk. I don't know.

I think I'll just replace the poles and leave it be.


Johhny, basments are done like this:

Deep concrete footings are to be installed prior to anything else. Engineer is supposed to determine the depth and width of the footing per soil conditions and weigth load of the structure above. Then, when the frame-work of the home is built, the lalleys are attached, cut down and installed to support the main carrying beam. Usually, much later, the dirt basement floor is prep'd. (Tamped down, poly, gravel, whatever....)
Last, the concrete pad is then poored. It is a non structural element. It usually ranges in thickness from 3" to 4". If your floor pad is at 2" and not cracked, don't worry about it (Somebody must have miscalculated the Cubic Yards when they ordered the concrete for it)
So, because you see a concrete pad there and around the post, does not "necessarily"* mean that the footing is sitting only on 2" of concrete.

* Unless "Three Stooges Construction" built your home.

johnny331 01-22-2008 10:47 PM

I'm back! And no they didn't fix themselves...

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 51766)
* Unless "Three Stooges Construction" built your home.


I think there may have been more than three of them. Anyways to make a long story short I supported the beam, removed the old support. I probed around with a hammer and easily busted up anything that was there, it was just in ruins, I mean I just dropped the hammer on it and it crumbled. There was standing water there for possibly years, It was abandoned with leaky foundation. Pics to come in a few hours if it helps.

SO, all I want to know is what would be "overkill" to put under these new supports. ANYTHING is better than just dirt, I just want to distribute that load over more than a 6x6 plate.

You ask if the slab is cracked? Uhh its utter ruins. All that water freeze cycle took its tole. It's got potholes in it, you can stick a darn screwdriver through it, its turned back into ready mix. I'm looking into replacing that too... one quote over the phone just on size was $3500 (40'x24') just to pour/finish, not including demo/prep. I might get some guys to do that myself

johnny331 01-22-2008 10:54 PM

I'm back! And no they didn't fix themselves...

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 51766)
* Unless "Three Stooges Construction" built your home.


I think there may have been more than three of them. Anyways to make a long story short I supported the beam, removed the old support. I probed around with a hammer and easily busted up anything that was there, it was just in ruins, I mean I just dropped the hammer on it and it crumbled. There was standing water there for possibly years, It was abandoned with leaky foundation.

SO, all I want to know is what would be "overkill" to put under these new supports. ANYTHING is better than just dirt, I just want to distribute that load over more than a 6x6 plate. How about a sonotube?

You ask if the slab is cracked? Uhh its utter ruins. All that water freeze cycle took its tole. It's got potholes in it, you can stick a darn screwdriver through it, its turned back into ready mix. I'm looking into replacing that too... one quote over the phone just on size was $3500 (40'x24') just to pour/finish, not including demo/prep. I might get some guys to do that myself


Found a pic... keep in mind this was from last year, before I bought the house. This is how it looked in its abandoned state. We've since replaced all the block, new footer drains, etc. It's bone dry now, just ugly with rusted supports :whistling2:

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b2...g/P1030303.jpg

Do you notice the I-beams they used to try and keep the walls from collapsing further??? They were simply cemented into the ground... nothing attached at the top.... um, yeah.

Knucklez 05-05-2008 06:44 PM

johnny, can you post the progress you made on this project along with pictures? i think your situation might help others (including me)

thanks!

Knucklez


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