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cbsrugby 05-06-2008 01:55 PM

Base for Storage Shed
 
I recently purchased a 8'x6' storage shed. I want to put a good foundation down for it. I was thinking of putting down a slab of concrete, but I have quite a bit of cinder blocks piled up that I could possibly use. Is there any good ideas how I could use these in the construction of the base for the shed? Or just stick to the concrete slab? Thanks for your advice in this matter!

47_47 05-06-2008 03:09 PM

Not knowing where you are located, I would first check with the local building inspector or permit office. In my area you can erect up to 128 ft² shed without a concrete base without a permit. If you use concrete you can build only 64 ft² without a permit. You could use pressure treated timbers for the bearing points on a compacted gravel base. I would forget about the using the block.

kgphoto 05-08-2008 09:01 AM

I would put down a slab with a vapor barrier underneath. It will take that slab longer to harden and longer for the surface water to evaporate so you can finish it, so don't rush.

You are under size for the code so it doesn't apply. A footing is not a bad thing to have however.

What is your frost depth where you are? Take that into account. A floating slab, that size probably would be fine. I put 4 inch welded wire in mine.

redwood99 05-08-2008 10:25 AM

In my area, they use a lot of these sheds and usually put them on a 4' x 4' grid of concrete post blocks which sit on the ground. This is much faster than laying a concrete pad, and allows for moving the whole thing easily too.

kgphoto 05-08-2008 11:25 AM

I should mention, that I don't use steel storage sheds due to the dewpoint rusting out anything that is within.

I pour the slab so it fits the walls exactly so there is no way for water to run underneath. I more often put the shed on plywood over 4x4's so it is raised off the concrete and that allows lifting with cranes and forklifts and removes the need of having footings regardless of the size of shed.

concretemasonry 05-08-2008 02:16 PM

I hope I do not live downwind from the shed.

My son had one hit his house during a storm.

kgphoto 05-08-2008 02:41 PM

Clearly,

They obviously didn't have enough stuff in them! :)

Of course if you live in tornado country, you should build them stronger and tie them down like a standard house.


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