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-   -   Balcony beam (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/balcony-beam-154103/)

kaiden 08-18-2012 12:16 PM

Balcony beam
 
Hello, need help, I'm building a balcony, I have a span between 2 4x4. The span is 11' 5 1/2". Would it be safe to use treated 2x8x12 sandwich together with 1/2 osb for this span?:whistling2: Living in N.M.

hand drive 08-18-2012 01:23 PM

how long are the joists and the height of the deck off of the ground? Thanks

kaiden 08-18-2012 02:06 PM

Hello Hand Drive, thank you for reading my post. The joist are 5'7" and the height will be 6'7".

hand drive 08-18-2012 03:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kaiden (Post 991589)
Hello Hand Drive, thank you for reading my post. The joist are 5'7" and the height will be 6'7".


NP, you will need 2 -2x10 for the beam and 6x6 posts with the beam notched into the posts from one side. Please do not use osb outside on a deck...

tony.g 08-18-2012 03:35 PM

If your deck live load is 40psf and dead load 10psf max, the total load on your 12ft span beam will be about 1650lbs.
If you use 2no. 2x8s , the bending stress in them will be between 1000 and 1100lbs /sq in. Most structural softwoods are in the range 800 - 1200 lbs/ sq in.,so assuming these loadings, you are probably near the limit.
I would be inclined to use 2 no. 2x10s to be on the safe side.



PS Just noticed HandDrives post;yes, no need to use OSB, and 6x6 posts more sturdy than 4x4.

kaiden 08-18-2012 11:17 PM

Do I need to sandwich the 2x10 with something or just put them together with nothing in between.

kaiden 08-18-2012 11:25 PM

Thank you Tony G. and Hand Drive for your knowledge, are the joist 2x6 ok.

GBrackins 08-18-2012 11:42 PM

Kaiden,

see Table 2 on page 3, it will give you the spans based upon the species of wood you are using and the spacing of the joists. Hope this helps.

http://www.awc.org/publications/DCA/DCA6/DCA6-09.pdf

joecaption 08-18-2012 11:46 PM

Anytime you think you can get by with 2 X 6's Use 2 X 8's. What good is it if the whole thing sags and bounces?

tony.g 08-19-2012 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kaiden (Post 991920)
Do I need to sandwich the 2x10 with something or just put them together with nothing in between.

Not necessary (or desireable) to sandwich anything inbetween. Just bolt/screw them firmly together to help them act as one beam.

Hammer450R 08-19-2012 10:32 AM

Run a zig zag of glue between the beam also if you have it. 2x6 joists for 6 feet is fine, but if it was mine i would go 2x8 joist and 2x10 even 2x12 for beam if you dont care about head room underneath.
6x6's for anything over 3 ft off the ground if it was me also...4x4's can go bananas (literally look like a banana lol)

tvanharp 08-19-2012 10:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tony.g

Not necessary (or desireable) to sandwich anything inbetween. Just bolt/screw them firmly together to help them act as one beam.

I had a similar situation and used 1/2" treated in the sandwich but i was also using Simpson brackets to join the beam to the post and that required a 3 1/2" beam. How are you joining the beam to the post? Check out
http://www.strongtie.com/products/ca...ml?source=home

Hammer450R 08-19-2012 11:20 AM

I would use a small chunk to fill in the xtra 1/2" at the bracket, I like to have nothing in between unless i had to.
But for this situation i would notch to 6x6 for the beam and thru bolt.

kaiden 08-19-2012 04:29 PM

Thanks guys, you all been alot of help, I really like this "DIY" my wife thinks I'm smart..lol.. One more question,,, If you all don't mind. If I am looking for head room, and I have a 11'7" span the height is 6'6", this is going to be a small shop under my boys club house, I'll have 8 joists. I would like to use two 2x6 together on all 8 joist, I know 2x8 or 2x10 would be better, but I need head room. My question is, are two 2x6 together stonger than 1 2x8??


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