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-   -   attaching garage loft support to 12 inch steel I beam (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/attaching-garage-loft-support-12-inch-steel-i-beam-52910/)

lospinoj 09-13-2009 10:58 AM

attaching garage loft support to 12 inch steel I beam
 
Hello All,

I'm planning to build a loft in our garage where the back edge will be supported by a 12 inch steel beam running along it's full length of 20 ft. I'm sure that the beam can easily support the weight of the loft by am not sure how best to attach vertical supports to the bottom of the beam. I hear of folks drilling or blasting nails into the beam, but would like to avoid a building inspector (or home inspector when we sell the place) giving me the sad news that I've weaked the beam.

Thanks in advance,

J.

Joe Carola 09-13-2009 01:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lospinoj (Post 327149)
Hello All,

I'm planning to build a loft in our garage where the back edge will be supported by a 12 inch steel beam running along it's full length of 20 ft. I'm sure that the beam can easily support the weight of the loft by am not sure how best to attach vertical supports to the bottom of the beam. I hear of folks drilling or blasting nails into the beam, but would like to avoid a building inspector (or home inspector when we sell the place) giving me the sad news that I've weaked the beam.

Thanks in advance,

J.

Whoever designs the steel for you will show you how to do it and when you file for permits you will see if they pass. Or do you not plan on doing this without permits and inspections now before you sell your house?

Aggie67 09-13-2009 09:43 PM

Yes, the best way to avoid a building inspector (or home inspector when you sell the place) giving you the sad news that you've weakened the beam is to design it correctly in the first place, and pull permits, and have the building inspector approve it.

Most folks don't realize that such modifications can be spotted a mile away, and that the buyer's home inspector's report will state "buyer should check for permits and final approvals on the following:..."

Termite 09-14-2009 12:16 AM

Don't be so sure that the addition of a loft won't negatively affect the beam's load-carrying capacity. Don't let the fact that it is steel make you think that it has massive strength. Spanning 20 carrying tributary load is a lot to ask of any beam.

What do you mean by "vertical supports"? Are you somehow supporting the roof to the beam, or framing a wall over it, or what?

lospinoj 09-14-2009 01:38 PM

Thanks All,

I'm taking no chances when it comes to permits and getting burned when it's time to sell this place. I already have a construction permit in hand and my town has stipulated that the support design must be Sealed by a Professional Engineer (I happen to be one, but will not stamp it myself to avoid any conflict of interest).

I have since found that a company called Thomas Betts, www.tnb.com, they make support struts and clamps for attaching structures to I beams.

I've not done the calculations yet, but my guess is that the beam will easily be able to support an additional distributed static load under 1000 pounds (coolers, holiday decorations, junk).

J.


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