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Old 01-18-2012, 12:37 PM   #1
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Attaching Beam to post


I am building a screened in deck (14' x 14') off the back of a house. It will be just a shed style roof off the house. I am planning on using 3- 4 x 4 posts to support the roof which will rest on the deck. The deck framing is done and proper for the roof load. What I would like to do use 2-2x8 or 2-2x10 which ever size I need? It will be about 7' spacing between posts. I would like to use 2x8 but I think I will need 2x10's. I was planning on putting 1/2" plywood between the 2-by lumber and just making 2 7' beams or one 14' beam. I don't know how to attach the beam to the post. I know I can use a metal bracket that is made for this case but since it will show was wondering if there might be some other options. or perhaps a different type of beam?

Thanks in advance,
Tim
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:25 PM   #2
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Attaching Beam to post


Do you need a permit? your building inspector will tell you what he wants.

For us all we need to do is toe screw it into place. Are you using angled braces at the top of your posts and your beam? We have used a bigger piece of plywood (a triangle) which gets sandwiched between 2 2x4 that go on the angle from being sandwich between the beam to the post. Usually keeping it up 1x2" from the bottom of the 2x4 so it provides a reveal. You screw your plywood triangle into one 2x4 then screw the other 2x4 on the other side, then screw the 2x4's to the post, makes a strong junction.
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:30 PM   #3
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Attaching Beam to post


How about a picture?
For that big a porch I would have used 6 X 6's not 4 X 4's.
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:42 PM   #4
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Attaching Beam to post


Here are some thoughts: The second one takes some explaining, but it is a very unique attachment setup.
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Attaching Beam to post-2x-overlap.jpg   Attaching Beam to post-beam-plywood.jpg   Attaching Beam to post-timber-joint-2.jpg   Attaching Beam to post-timber-joint.jpg  
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:47 PM   #5
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The second pic was sort of what I meant.
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:51 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mae-ling View Post
The second pic was sort of what I meant.
That one requires routing a groove in the sides of the post, and either the 2x can be shortened to opposite offsets (like the first picture), or the plywood "sandwich" can run on into the next set of beams.

And you can leave the plywood solid like on the rights, or cut like on the lefts, and cover both sides with angled wood braces... mostly for looks.

It works like this:
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Attaching Beam to post-beam-plywood-2.jpg   Attaching Beam to post-beam-plywood-3.jpg   Attaching Beam to post-beam-plywood-4.jpg  
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Old 01-18-2012, 02:09 PM   #7
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Concealed joist tie:

http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...rs/CJT_APG.asp

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Old 01-18-2012, 02:22 PM   #8
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Quote:
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I like these, except that unless you cut the slot all the way through, you can't get them on if the posts won't move enough..... and usually the client won't agree to the full cuts. (Looks!)
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Old 01-18-2012, 02:25 PM   #9
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no pics, as nothing is built yet except the deck.

I think 6 x 6's would be too big. I will have some additional 4 x4 on the sides for a door and for the screening.


I like the first pic. with the overlapping joints, but if I notch out 3 " (2-2x8) then there is only 1/2 inch left. There must be a standard way of doing this, because many screened decks use 4x4 posts.

Also will 2-2x8 with plywood between meet code?
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Old 01-18-2012, 03:36 PM   #10
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I like the Concealed joist tie, but I don't need to hang the beam from the posts. Could I use that bracket vertically? That way my beam will rest on the posts and still be secured to the post. perhaps there is a bracket for this.
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Old 01-18-2012, 03:56 PM   #11
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I was planning on using 4 x4's for the diagonal bracing with lag bolts to the post and bottom of beam. Or perhaps something like this: http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...E-LPCZ-LCE.asp perhaps painted black? I think these will take the place of the bracing.
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Old 01-18-2012, 04:28 PM   #12
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Here's a couple of more ideas. You could leave or take as much of beam or post as you chose to cut. A lot of leeway here.

I realize I drew these on a 45 because they are diagonal braces, but you just have to imagine them straight to see how it would work with the beam, itself.
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:16 AM   #13
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[quote=NCFord;826940]

There must be a standard way of doing this, because many screened decks use 4x4 posts.

[quote]

Most often when I view stuff like that the beams are held in place with nails. I'm not saying that's a good way, but I see it a lot.

With 4x4 posts, you could notch out 1.5 inches and have one beam fit into the post. The other one butts up to the post. You need to check the shear strength of the single beam vs. your snow load, but shear strength is rarely an issue -- beams are made the size they are for deflection.

IF shear is an issue, then you could make the same notch, but instead of cutting the other 2x and butting it, you could keep them both the same length, and use a longer bolt. I.e., one 2x would be hanging out in the air.

You could check a span table -- maybe you could use three 2x6. The innermost butts, the second sits on a notch, an the third is outside.
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:17 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
I like these, except that unless you cut the slot all the way through, you can't get them on if the posts won't move enough..... and usually the client won't agree to the full cuts. (Looks!)
Can't you cut the slot from the top and stop before getting to the bottom, and then install the joist from the bottom?
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Old 01-19-2012, 11:23 AM   #15
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Attaching Beam to post


I agree that toe nailing is not the best way to go. I am in raleigh, NC so not really any snow load. Does anyone have a link for a span table? I like the idea of notching 1 1/2 inches out and let the other 2x8 butt up against the post. Would I add 1/2 ply inbetween the 2x8's?
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