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Old 12-01-2010, 07:34 PM   #16
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


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Originally Posted by mrgins View Post
The force on the bracket is shear.
Not all of it.
Quote:
The metal plate would be thicker than the stud gauge, and the weight would be distributed by the number of screws going thru the plate. Absolutely no problem!
There's still no reason to add a second metal plate to the mount- which is a metal plate. If you wanted to, you could screw all your sheet metal screws right thru the mount itself and get the same desired effect without the middleman of having a second plate. But I would recommend using toggles instead, much stronger.

As I've mentioned, I've done this on a professional basis in which toggles have been speced by the engineer. I can't see any engineer saying to use "a whole bunch of sheet metal screws"

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Old 12-01-2010, 07:37 PM   #17
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


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Originally Posted by VersaBar View Post
Not all of it.

There's still no reason to add a second metal plate to the mount- which is a metal plate. If you wanted to, you could screw all your sheet metal screws right thru the mount itself and get the same desired effect without the middleman of having a second plate. But I would recommend using toggles instead, much stronger.
I understand what you're saying. If I used just the mount, I'd use toggles. If I used an additional plate, I'd settle for screws. If it was a weight of 70# or more, I'd do something even more substantial.
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Old 12-02-2010, 11:21 AM   #18
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


None of us asked Billy how wide his bracket is.

If it 24" or less, he's going to have to use a plate of some kind. On top of the wall or inside the wall.

If he is going to hide his wires in the wall. (I think this looks cleaner) Cut to the chase, and open the wall up. Hide all your wires. Route your electrical so you have boxes hidden behind the TV, and no wires running up the wall. If you're this far, put the plate inside the wall.

Another reason for doing this is: 10 years ago, no one would have thought you would be mounting a 40" TV on the wall. 10 years from now he might want to mount a 70". If you do the work now, you won't need to re-do in next time.

How you attach it to the metal studs, seems like a silly argument to me. Several sheet metal screws or a couple of toggle bolts I think we will all agree will hold about the same.

If you put a plate (I asume 3/4 plywood) outside the wall. You would have to span the studs. (attach any way you like, I won't argue with you) As long as it is solidly mounted to the wall you can now attach the mounting bracket with screws, lag bolts, toggles, any where you have a mounting hole in the braket. This would be very quick, strong, but your wires will all be exposed.

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Old 12-02-2010, 01:49 PM   #19
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


The plate I'm talking about would be a metal plate of sufficient rigidity to work.
You're idea of the wires behind the wall is good. I could see using 3/4" plywood behind the drywall as you could secure it thru the U of one stud, but since the studs all face the same way, you'd have to attach it to the other stud using a different method. I think I'd rather try to fish the wires thru a small hole
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Old 12-02-2010, 02:20 PM   #20
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


I agree, you would have to sister another stud on one side with the U pointed the other direction.

The only problem I have with just poking holes and fishing the wires thru the wall is... Is it up to code? I wouldn't want to see someone try to hide an extention cord in the wall and end up burning down his house. If you could get the power cord cleanly thru and plugged in. It might look a little funny, but probably wouldn't be unsafe.
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Old 12-02-2010, 05:02 PM   #21
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


I was assuming everything would be hard wired. I wouldn't string an extension cord thru the wall
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Old 12-02-2010, 07:17 PM   #22
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


When new commercial work is being done it is common to install blocking in the framing where they know TVs will be mounted, this takes all the guess work out of hanging the mount and makes it faster to throw the TV up later when the job is always in a rush to finish.

In these situations, which I have seen many, many times (I did a lot of work in hospitals), the carpenters always use a piece of plywood to span between two studs. They always put the one side into the "U" of the stud like you mentioned but the other side just gets screwed straight thru the stud into the edge of the plywood. I have never seen a carpenter turn the second stud around, so I guess that's really not necessary. I just figured I'd mention that.

DozerDan, you said: "None of us asked Billy how wide his bracket is."
In the first post the thread starter said he would "put 2 bolts into each stud" which tells me that his mount will span two studs at least. If he can't get two studs, I might be more inclined to opening up the wall. But on the other hand, there are plenty of people who hang small TVs with just toggle bolts thru the sheetrock without a problem, so I'm on the fence.
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Old 12-02-2010, 07:34 PM   #23
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


I agree. But when most of us think about two studs, we normally think about 16" centers.

My reasoning for bringing this up was if his bracket is 24" wide, and his studs are on 24"centers, then attaching right to the studs could be a problem. I don't think I would rely on the outermost holes in the bracket. I would at least put a few toggles in the center for extra holding.

We are not talking about alot of weight. I agree, toggle bolts into the drywall will probably hold, but I wouldn't do it. Even the manufacturer wants him to mount it to studs.
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Old 09-27-2014, 12:52 AM   #24
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


I am hoping people still watch this thread and respond even though it is old. My exact situation is 24" OC metal studs need to hang 23" AIO system weighing 22 lbs. Medical office, public location where people may be at any time.
The building is 30 yrs old and has a textured wallpaper with vertical lines and about 10 coats of paint over. They do not want to have the drywall cut into because this may prove to be temporary. Also want to preserve the texture of the wallpaper if possible but that may be impossible.
Would like to avoid adding plywood to outside because it is supposed to be even with an existing light box and the plywood will push it out too far.
MY THEORY is that I can pre drill 2) 4x4 electrical box covers with a pair of corner holes and holes in the center aligned with the mounting bracket which uses only a pair of holes in a vertical pattern. Can not catch stud because the door to light box distance is about 26" and monitor is roughly 22" wide.

My theory was that I can cut a single slot 4" with a keyhole saw that can be closed and completely invisible with caulk and a dab of paint.

Predrill the 4" plate with 4) 1/2" holes. One in a top corner and one diag corner from that. Use plate to mark wall and drill matching holes into the drywall. Drill another hole in the wall above the drop ceiling directly above the point where the mount will go.

Tie a line to a washer and use my MAGNETIC CABLE FISHING TOOL to draw the washer down to the SLOT IN THE WALL.

Tie into the 4" plate and feed it through the wall and slide it up to the position where it will be anchored.

Capture one of the holes with a wire with a crook in the end then push a toggler through the holes in the drywall and the metal plate for each of the 2 positioning holes.

Finally finish off by setting togglers into the point where the monitor hangar hardware will be attached.

I know I can pull this off but I am having a hard time figuring out if there is a good advantage to this. I believe the larger surface area will prevent the drywall from ripping out better than just putting a pair of toggles directly into the 30 year old drywall. Drywall seems to be 5/8" but hard to tell exactly due to the amount of coatings. Pretty sure not 1/2" and it does not make 3/4" even with the textured paper and paint .
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Old 09-27-2014, 01:01 AM   #25
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Attaching 40-in. flat TV to metal studs?


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Originally Posted by DozerDan View Post
Nascar9,

What trailer park do you live in? Seriously, what you are describing will hold, but it will be very ugly.

Here's how I would do it.

First, take a sledge hammer and open up the wall. Be careful not to bend the metal studs. Then anchor a solid plate of 3/4 plywood between the two studs. While you're there run electrical, TV cables, speaker wires. Put conduit in, and J-Boxes. Hide everything inside the walls.

I am having a hard time figuring out why I would open a wall and mount wood which should make it about level and then put drywall back on top which would stick out the thickness of the drywall.

I am also confused about why someone would use a sledge hammer when a saw would do it.

There are some very nice hand saws that will cut through plaster or drywall and for less than $100.00 a person with no reciprocating saw could purchase one or rent one for likely under $20.00 a day and avoid all the ragged damage that results from hammering a wall with a sledge.

I believe you were just trying to get people worked up unless they do not sell saws in the area where you work.

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