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Old 07-04-2011, 02:53 PM   #31
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Attached garage, fire codes violation?


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Originally Posted by Anti-wingnut View Post
But in the first post, you said not to use drywall or sheetrock, because it "wouldn't pass (fire) code". Now there is a fire rated drywall, distinct from gypsum board?

Oh lord, are you sent here to punish us? It really isn't that difficult to understand. It basically works out that you're wrong and won't admit it.

Have you ever looked at a set of plans by a registered architect? They refer to everything as GWB
I said there is fire rated drywall. Its a C or some letter like that.

As for plans, yes, I have seen/read many. Use to bid lots of commercial,. And no, they don't all list just GWB.

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Old 07-04-2011, 03:37 PM   #32
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Attached garage, fire codes violation?


According to this article, Type X drywall is similar to Type C, except that Type C has more fiberglass and more additives than Type X.

More additives equates to less Gypsum in Type C, not more.

I'm not interested in fueling a pissing match, just trying to learn something.

http://www.certainteed.com/learning-...ypsum/?qid=124

FWIW, I never heard of Type C before today. Type X is the norm here.
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Old 07-04-2011, 04:01 PM   #33
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Attached garage, fire codes violation?


I believe the purpose of Type C is to come up with an alternative to 5/8 X in a 1/2" product. The 5/8" C I believe is meant to be used as a part of an assembly where greater than one hour is needed.

Beenthere will debate us until we both retired, some people will never admit that their wrong. Please Beenthere, show us proof that there is a recognized and systematic difference between GWB, drywall and sheetrock, or shut up about it
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Old 07-04-2011, 04:10 PM   #34
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Attached garage, fire codes violation?


Back to the OP.

Likely what you had was "grandfathered." Now, since you started making changes you have to bring it all up to the latest code.

I wouldn't feel comfortable with the windows and would probably do as you are but in all likelihood you didn't have to do anything.

Your home inspector may have done you a disservice.

For the windows, I'd still consider it an exterior wall. I wouldn't put shelving units up without insulation and vapor barrier at least as good as what you currently have.
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Old 07-04-2011, 04:16 PM   #35
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Attached garage, fire codes violation?


If you read my previous post, 1/2" Sheetrock, drywall, gypsum wall board is allowed by the 2003 IRC. It may have changed with later codes, but under 5/8" thickness, GWB manufacturere have no "fire code" designations.

Drywall, Sheetrock, GWB, Gypsum Wall Board are all equal nomenclatures for the same product. "Type X" is the added spec that designates it as fire code.
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Old 07-04-2011, 04:31 PM   #36
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Attached garage, fire codes violation?


The home inspector is never recognized as being familiar with codes and is NOT a code inspector, especially when it is an older structure. He is hired for a generalist to look at many elements to point out existive or emminent problems that affect the future replacement of items or the safety of the use of the property. They are usually hired by buyer or sellers of property for a cheap price, rather than hire individual specialits. He does not have a crystal ball and cannot predict what chages someone may choose to do later.

Making any major changes automatically throws out all of the "grandfathered" conditions associated with the changes and current codes must be used. A recent addition or work will immediately be a red flag for any inspector and it will be looked at closely. Usually any item are reported for informational purposes for the buyer or seller (whoever pays him). Usually a seller hires the toughest inspector possible (irregardless of the price) before listing and the buyer just hires an inspector that is recommended by a realtor that wants a sale to go through easily. - Sad, but true.

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Old 07-04-2011, 04:38 PM   #37
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Attached garage, fire codes violation?


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Usually a seller hires the toughest inspector possible (irregardless of the price) before listing and the buyer just hires an inspector that is recommended by a realtor that wants a sale to go through easily. - Sad, but true.

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The biggest issue I have with home inspectors is that they point out issues that were code compliant when the building was constructed that have changed with later code revisions. This usually causes the buyer to force the seller to unnecessarily bring the item up to current code (or lose the sale).
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Old 07-04-2011, 05:22 PM   #38
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Attached garage, fire codes violation?


Quote:
Originally Posted by loneframer View Post
According to this article, Type X drywall is similar to Type C, except that Type C has more fiberglass and more additives than Type X.

More additives equates to less Gypsum in Type C, not more.

I'm not interested in fueling a pissing match, just trying to learn something.

http://www.certainteed.com/learning-...ypsum/?qid=124

FWIW, I never heard of Type C before today. Type X is the norm here.
X is the most common here also, C is just referred to as fire resistant drywall here.

Wasn't sure of its letter designation anymore.
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Old 07-04-2011, 06:57 PM   #39
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Attached garage, fire codes violation?


rjniles -

That is a common problem and one reason to make sure the inspector is certified by good national organization or is certified by the state, which usulally have very similar requirements (like the inspector dot doing and work on the property and providing at least 3 references for contractor.

Lost sales are the reason a smart seller hires the toughest and usually the most expensive inpector to avoid the last minute meaningless haggling that only reduces the selling price.

A certified home inspector never offers a code inspection because there is usually no idea when work was done and he is just a guest in the property and cannot operate many systems (like popping a moisture protected outlet and unknowingly cutting power to a computer system or an oxygen refilling system). Even when it comes to testing a PT valve on a water heater that will not re-seat afterward, the replacement cost is greater than the cost of an inspection. That is why an experienced eye is valuable to see clues like boxes in a basement (which cannot be moved) could be hiding a water leak. Those are just the simple and obvious problems.

Once you throw in the dates of modifications and the applicable codes at that time make the opinions very vague, so they are usually noted for the customer (buyer or seller) to use since it is a confidential report.

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