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Old 02-01-2007, 08:38 PM   #1
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Atlantic-I need you- Help.


I just read a post from BWB (I think), where he said that you cannot use pressure treated lumber inside the house because it is toxic.

I have put pressure treated lumber on my cement floor in my basement as my bottom plate.

Please, don't tell me I have to remove this?


(I was told once that pressure treated is bad for you, if you decide to eat half your deck.)

thanks

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Old 02-01-2007, 09:01 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yummy mummy View Post
I just read a post from BWB (I think), where he said that you cannot use pressure treated lumber inside the house because it is toxic.

I have put pressure treated lumber on my cement floor in my basement as my bottom plate.

Please, don't tell me I have to remove this?


(I was told once that pressure treated is bad for you, if you decide to eat half your deck.)

thanks
First off: NO, YOU DO NOT HAVE TO REMOVE IT!!!

HA, HA, Ha...who in the world wrote that and where???

Just so you know, this is per building code: Pressure treated lumber components MUST BE USED for any lumber directly attached to concrete surfaces.
Again - This is REQUIRED by code.

This is the point: PT lumber is generally not used in actual living areas above the 1st floor beacuse it is NOT NEEDED. It is used as a weather and moisture resistant material. Thus, it's wide, general use in basements and areas with higher moisture content.


Someone is confused (Who ever told you this has no clue about construction standards and codes). I have had several discussions about such things before. Even One of our company foremen was mis-informed that: "PT lumber is not supposed to be used on the main living level of residential structures".

The following is the building code that we follow.
Please be aware that the code book that we use (and our unrestricted builder's license is based on) is much more strict than the international residential building code. (exception=earthquake prone areas)


According to MA State Building Code: Under 780 CMR 2311.0 NATURALLY DURABLE AND PRESERVATIVE-TREATED WOOD.
2311.3.2 - Where wood that is pressure treated with water-borne preservative is used in enclosed locations where drying service cannot readily occur, such wood shall be at a moisture content of 19 percent OR LESS before being covered with insulation, interior wall finish, floor covering or other material.

So, in effect, YES there is a code that does not allow Treated Wood to be used in an interior residential wall if it does not meet the approved Moisture Content Level.

Because moisture content can be hard to verify and very few contractors carry an accurate moisture meter, Inspectors in our parts WILL NOT allow improperly dried PT to be used on any interior walls. So, it is generally not allowed when it is unnecessary and there is no definite function for it being installed in that location of an enclosed interior wall(s).
That has been our experience with our local building inspectors.

As I mentioned earlier in this reply, this DOES NOT APPLY TO BASEMENTS: PT lumber IS REQUIRED by code to be used in ALL basement walls in this capacity - When it is serving as the 'base plate' where walls/structures are attached directly to concrete.

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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-01-2007 at 09:07 PM.
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Old 02-01-2007, 09:07 PM   #3
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Atlantic-I need you- Help.


Thank you so much for the information.

I completely understand your explanation.
Thankfully, I will not have to remove them.


Love you,



P.S. BWB-don't give yummy mummy a heart attack.
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Old 02-01-2007, 09:12 PM   #4
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Information:

Current pressure treated/ preservative ....treated lumber is primarily copper based. Recommended fasteners should be stainless steel or other properly treated/coated fasteners. Common 'bright' nails or fasteners will react and corrode with the new copper-treated lumber.

Code now, even requires copper flashing to be used on all deck structures (Not aluminum).

THUS: it is NOT arsenic based as PT lumber was ...in the past.

The issue today...is about proper drying/moisture content of the lumber..., not dangerous chemicals in the lumber. The lumber is preserved with copper products.....
(Realize that if the copper were an issue: We would have to throw away all our pennies and rip out all our copper plumbing...)

The same codes apply to KD grade lumber.... regarding it's moisture content.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 02-01-2007 at 09:24 PM.
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Old 02-01-2007, 09:15 PM   #5
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You're the best!!!
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Old 02-02-2007, 06:37 AM   #6
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I imagine that the previous bad information that you received was the result of a news report and medical study many years ago. In the late 80's, many homeowners were building playsets for their children with treated lumber. Subsequently, children started getting sick because the children would play on the swing sets and put their fingers in their mouths. So they were ingesting residue from the chemicals that were used to treat the lumber.

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