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-   -   Anchor 4x4 Post to Cement Pier (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/anchor-4x4-post-cement-pier-143114/)

ulrichfolkers 05-08-2012 01:37 PM

Anchor 4x4 Post to Cement Pier
 
Hi All,

The side entry steps & landing of my recently purchased house need to be replaced. It consists of 2 stairs and a 3' by 4' landing all PTL. I noticed that the existing 4x4 posts are buried about 5 or 6 inches in the ground before they come to rest on the cement piers. To say it another way, the cement piers are 5 or 6 inches below grade. I've been racking my brain trying to think of the best way to deal with this (anchoring new 4x4 posts to concrete pier) as I get ready to frame this out with PTL. I was thinking about using Simpson Strong-tie anchor ABU44 (or something similar), but I'm concerned about the anchor rusting out. Can some folks share how they would deal with this?

Thanks

Greg24k 05-08-2012 01:47 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by ulrichfolkers (Post 917162)
Hi All,

The side entry steps & landing of my recently purchased house need to be replaced. It consists of 2 stairs and a 3' by 4' landing all PTL. I noticed that the existing 4x4 posts are buried about 5 or 6 inches in the ground before they come to rest on the cement piers. To say it another way, the cement piers are 5 or 6 inches below grade. I've been racking my brain trying to think of the best way to deal with this (anchoring new 4x4 posts to concrete pier) as I get ready to frame this out with PTL. I was thinking about using Simpson Strong-tie anchor ABU44 (or something similar), but I'm concerned about the anchor rusting out. Can some folks share how they would deal with this?

Thanks

Use Simpson post connector you can purchase in any store. You will also need a sleeve anchor to attach the connector to concrete.

ulrichfolkers 05-08-2012 02:08 PM

Anchor 4x4 Post to Cement Pier
 
Do you think I need to be concerned about this rusting over time?

framer52 05-08-2012 02:10 PM

Nope.

ulrichfolkers 05-08-2012 02:14 PM

Anchor 4x4 Post to Cement Pier
 
Thanks......

kwikfishron 05-08-2012 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ulrichfolkers (Post 917181)
Do you think I need to be concerned about this rusting over time?

Quote:

Originally Posted by framer52 (Post 917185)
Nope.

That's assuming OP doesn't live on the Coast.

framer52 05-08-2012 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 917239)
That's assuming OP doesn't live on the Coast.

Correct.

woodworkbykirk 05-08-2012 06:46 PM

the type of achor greg posted is the cats meow. honestly. they have more than enough strength and the void at the bottom creates an air space so the bottom of the post itself can dry out

cortell 05-08-2012 06:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk (Post 917366)
the type of achor greg posted is the cats meow. honestly. they have more than enough strength and the void at the bottom creates an air space so the bottom of the post itself can dry out

It should be noted it's also considerably more expensive than other, simpler post connectors.

AndyGump 05-08-2012 07:33 PM

Is the post to remain in contact with the ground?
That is, will be buried also?

Andy.

kwikfishron 05-08-2012 08:13 PM

I’ve used those a few times.

There easy and it’s nice they hold you off the ground and yes there pricey but when do you use them anyway???

When your building something off a slab, as an afterthought, as a way to connect something that wasn’t designed to be there in the first place.

I’ll bet that at least half the time their used there should be a footing under that slab that doesn’t exist. :whistling2:

GBrackins 05-09-2012 12:28 AM

if you are concerned about rusting you could purchase those in stainless steel. certainly cost more.

I think Andy was bringing up the fact that if you are going to bury the 4x4's in the ground make sure your pressure treated posts are rated for ground contact and not normal pressure treated. ground contact gets more treatment than normal pressure treated.

ulrichfolkers 05-09-2012 08:28 AM

Anchor 4x4 Post to Cement Pier
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by AndyGump (Post 917400)
Is the post to remain in contact with the ground?
That is, will be buried also?

Andy.

Yes, about 5 or 6 inches of the 4x4 will be buried. I was thinking about putting some gravel around the 4x4, to provide a bit more drainage.

I was surprised to find the cement column (pier) below grade. Was this a common practice at one time in the past?

ulrichfolkers 05-09-2012 08:33 AM

Anchor 4x4 Post to Cement Pier
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GBrackins (Post 917618)
if you are concerned about rusting you could purchase those in stainless steel. certainly cost more.

I think Andy was bringing up the fact that if you are going to bury the 4x4's in the ground make sure your pressure treated posts are rated for ground contact and not normal pressure treated. ground contact gets more treatment than normal pressure treated.

Good call about the ground contact PTL. I believe I'm looking for .60 treated vs .40 treated?

You're right about the stainless steel anchors. I'll check to see how much more they are.

cortell 05-09-2012 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ulrichfolkers (Post 917719)
Yes, about 5 or 6 inches of the 4x4 will be buried. I was thinking about putting some gravel around the 4x4, to provide a bit more drainage.

I was surprised to find the cement column (pier) below grade. Was this a common practice at one time in the past?

Replacing the 5-6 inches of soil with gravel is a good idea. It will definitely reduce the amount of moisture that portion of the post is subjected to. However, it's much better to just extend the pier to above ground at least 4 inches.

As for why the pier was not poured to above ground...aesthetics. It's looks neater having the post come out of the ground than to have a concrete pier protruding 4-6 inches above ground. Also, it's cheaper--less concrete. It's a bad call, IMO. Eventually, that wood will deteriorate and fail--even if it's PT rated for underground use, or cedar. When? Who knows. Maybe 10 years; maybe 30. Depends on a number of factors. Keeping wood from direct contact with soil makes a drastic difference in the lifespan of the wood.


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