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-   -   Advice on purchase of a pancake compressor (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/advice-purchase-pancake-compressor-7727/)

joe3534 04-11-2007 08:58 PM

Advice on purchase of a pancake compressor
 
I'm considering purchasing a Porter-Cable pancake compresser for installing crown molding, baseboard, chair rail, etc.. It comes with 3 nail guns and is rated at 150psi. I believe it is a 5 gallon tank. Will this be sufficient and will it handle a framing nailer?

handyflyer 04-11-2007 09:35 PM

I can tell you that it most definetly will. I purchased the kit you have about 4 years ago and it works great. About 2 years ago I purchased the Porter Cable F350 framing nailer and I used it to build a shed. Right now I am using it to finish my basement. I've put about 4000 nails through it and both the compressor and gun are great. The compressor cycles on about after 20 framing nails are shot. Don't know where I would be without either of them.

AtlanticWBConst. 04-11-2007 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joe3534 (Post 40619)
I'm considering purchasing a Porter-Cable pancake compresser for installing crown molding, baseboard, chair rail, etc.. It comes with 3 nail guns and is rated at 150psi. I believe it is a 5 gallon tank. Will this be sufficient and will it handle a framing nailer?

Yes, it will...

handy man88 04-11-2007 11:53 PM

Yes, but very noisy and compressor will click on often since the tank is small.

AtlanticWBConst. 04-12-2007 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by handy man88 (Post 40655)
Yes, but very noisy and compressor will click on often since the tank is small.

Easy, fix.....Put the compressor in another room, use 50-100 ft. hose = nice and quite.

handy man88 04-12-2007 01:38 PM

Yes, but you'll experience a pressure drop due to the increase in hose length. Compressor will have to work even harder.

mikim 04-12-2007 02:03 PM

I've seen that kit -- go for it -- you'll love it. I also have a PC350 framing hammer and run it with a pancake compressor - no problem. I don't know how I did anything before I had all my guns.

Clutchcargo 04-12-2007 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joe3534 (Post 40619)
I'm considering purchasing a Porter-Cable pancake compresser for installing crown molding, baseboard, chair rail, etc.. It comes with 3 nail guns and is rated at 150psi. I believe it is a 5 gallon tank. Will this be sufficient and will it handle a framing nailer?

That's the one that I have. I don't know why I waited so long to buy one. It passed my sawzall as my favorite tool. I've got the Makita AN922 framing nailer and it keeps up with that. I would imagine if I were driving a lot of nails at once like when siding a house, I might need to let it catch up, though. Another nailer that I think is a must-have is a palm nailer. I've got the cheapo Grizzly ($19.99) and it will drive 20d in a second.

AtlanticWBConst. 04-12-2007 02:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by handy man88 (Post 40719)
Yes, but you'll experience a pressure drop due to the increase in hose length. Compressor will have to work even harder.

...and ?

All we use are 100' hoses on our framing jobs. For one DIY person to run one framer on their project using such a compressor and 100' hose is not that demanding.
It's not the same as the pace that we run 3 + framers with rapid bump firing on a large project, for which we use a different larger oil fed compressor with larger tanks.

Really, that pancake compressor can take it.
We have one of those exact same model compressors. We use it in the cold months (no oil) to do smaller jobs. We have had it for 5 years = no problems at all keeping up with a single framer (aimed firing) on a 100' hose. Ours is pretty beat up, but it keeps going....

Brik 04-12-2007 03:04 PM

Never heard of pressure drop when using longer hoses. I have heard that a compressor cycles a little less often because of extra volume of air. Whatever.

Anyway - What the others said. The PC compressor will be fine for your use.

You may also want to consider the new Makita compressors. They are significantly quieter.
Here are a few links.
http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=pr...det&tag=MAC700
http://www.makita.com/assets_product...0/mac700_m.jpg
and
http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=pr...et&tag=MAC2400
http://www.makita.com/assets_product.../mac2400_m.jpg

One friend has the small one, another has the dual tank. Every time I hear them kick on I am amazed!

handy man88 04-12-2007 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 40728)
...and ?

All we use are 100' hoses on our framing jobs. For one DIY person to run one framer on their project using such a compressor and 100' hose is not that demanding.
It's not the same as the pace that we run 3 + framers with rapid bump firing on a large project, for which we use a different larger oil fed compressor with larger tanks.

Really, that pancake compressor can take it.
We have one of those exact same model compressors. We use it in the cold months (no oil) to do smaller jobs. We have had it for 5 years = no problems at all keeping up with a single framer (aimed firing) on a 100' hose. Ours is pretty beat up, but it keeps going....


My point was that since it's going to have to work harder due to the longer length of hose, that means the compressor will fire off more than usual even though you have it in another room. Using it on a construction site is no problem, but using it in a home where the windows and doors are closed is like a sudden jolt. You're a full time contractor, so you're probably used to hearing compressors firing off. For the homeowner DIY'er, it gets annoying after awhile.

handy man88 04-12-2007 03:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brik (Post 40733)
Never heard of pressure drop when using longer hoses. I have heard that a compressor cycles a little less often because of extra volume of air. Whatever.

Anyway - What the others said. The PC compressor will be fine for your use.

You may also want to consider the new Makita compressors. They are significantly quieter.
Here are a few links.
http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=pr...det&tag=MAC700
http://www.makita.com/assets_product...0/mac700_m.jpg
and
http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=pr...et&tag=MAC2400
http://www.makita.com/assets_product.../mac2400_m.jpg

One friend has the small one, another has the dual tank. Every time I hear them kick on I am amazed!

If only they came in a kit, I'd get the quieter ones in a heartbeat. I currently have the pancake compressor one from PC. Quieter ones may be better for the DIY'er because the DIY'er could be doing work at all hours of the day during his free time, and that could mean when the family is sleeping.

Brik 04-12-2007 03:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by handy man88 (Post 40747)
If only they came in a kit, I'd get the quieter ones in a heartbeat. I currently have the pancake compressor one from PC.

Ah, they DO come in a kit!
http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=pr...t&tag=MAC700K2
http://www.makita.com/assets_product...MAC700K2_m.jpg

and
http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=pr...t&tag=MAC700K1
http://www.makita.com/assets_product...mac700k1_m.jpg

and
http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=pr...t&tag=MAC700K3
http://www.makita.com/assets_product...MAC700K3_m.jpg

handy man88 04-12-2007 04:23 PM

Nice. Price?

Unfortunately, HD and Lowe's hardly carry the nice Makita tools.

Brik 04-12-2007 04:55 PM

Do I need to do all the work???

From Amazon
MAC700 $159
MAC2400 $259

MAC700k1 $252 toolbarn

I may eventually get one of these compressors. I'm set with nailers. I got a several recon porter cable nailers and they have been excellent.


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