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-   -   adding a second floor (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/adding-second-floor-455/)

chubdo 03-21-2005 11:37 AM

adding a second floor
 
hello gents, here is my situation and i hope i can get some wise pointers before i proceed further with my intended plan.

i have a ranch house in good condition. built in late 70s. i have 4 bedrooms on one side, then living room, family room in the middle, and kitchen, another room and garages on the other end.

i am thinking of the possibility of adding a second floor the the bedroom side of the house. one fo the main reasons of doing this is that currently my 2 kids are sharing the hallway bathroom with my in law, making it inconvenient.

if a second floor is added, i am thinking of making 3 bedrooms: one master with its bath, 2 other bedrooms each with its own bathrm.

i have the following question. in general:

1. when adding the second floor, does the first floor have to be taken apart. does the new frame have to be built from the base? oh by the, i live in new york region, so no hurricane.

2. what are things to watch out for and pay attention to?

thank you very much in advance.

giddonah 03-21-2005 03:25 PM

First step is to have the foundation inspected. You can probably call the local building inspector or an independant inpsector (or even an engineer if you want to go all the way). The first floor won't necessecarily have to be demo'd, but you will have to make some of the walls cary more of a load than before (all exterior walls and some interiors). You'll want some professional help with this, and the only real advice that I'd trust would be from someone with some kind of certification who can physically lay eyes on the project. Where in NY? I might be able to help.

chubdo 03-21-2005 04:36 PM

thank you very much for your time
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by giddonah
First step is to have the foundation inspected. You can probably call the local building inspector or an independant inpsector (or even an engineer if you want to go all the way). The first floor won't necessecarily have to be demo'd, but you will have to make some of the walls cary more of a load than before (all exterior walls and some interiors). You'll want some professional help with this, and the only real advice that I'd trust would be from someone with some kind of certification who can physically lay eyes on the project. Where in NY? I might be able to help.

i am in long island new york.

giddonah 03-21-2005 05:31 PM

I'm on the other side of the city. I know some good people, but it might be too far for them. Check in your area for some good inspectors on the foundation, it might stop your project in its tracks.

chubdo 03-21-2005 06:07 PM

thank you again
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by giddonah
I'm on the other side of the city. I know some good people, but it might be too far for them. Check in your area for some good inspectors on the foundation, it might stop your project in its tracks.

pardon my ignorance, when you say foundation, you mean the cement foundation or whatever that is built on it? just FYI, the area under the current bedrooms area has an elevated basement, like a crawl space.

giddonah 03-21-2005 07:50 PM

yes, I mean what sits on the ground and supports the structure. If it isn't up to it, all the extra weight might shift or crack it. Worst case scenario: a side fails and the house slides off the foundation.

When you use basement and crawl space in the same sentence you confuse me. As far as I define them, they're mutually exclusive.

Is the house sitting on formed concrete or blocks?

chubdo 03-21-2005 10:38 PM

the house is quite well built
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by giddonah
yes, I mean what sits on the ground and supports the structure. If it isn't up to it, all the extra weight might shift or crack it. Worst case scenario: a side fails and the house slides off the foundation.

When you use basement and crawl space in the same sentence you confuse me. As far as I define them, they're mutually exclusive.

Is the house sitting on formed concrete or blocks?

on the half of the house where the bedrooms are, the basement level is at least 4 feet higher than the rest. when i get on to there, i need to crouch because the height between the elevated cement floor and the first floor wood support is about 4 feet. i always wondered why this part of the basement has an elevated base.

hey, thanks for your time.

giddonah 03-22-2005 05:28 PM

So it's part basement and part "squat space"? This sounds like poured concrete. Have it checked, it might work.

chubdo 03-22-2005 06:49 PM

yo da man, thanks again. will do.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by giddonah
So it's part basement and part "squat space"? This sounds like poured concrete. Have it checked, it might work.

thanks

rabadger 03-23-2005 09:00 PM

Is it a two car garage? Can you go up and give the inlaws more room?

chubdo 03-27-2005 09:10 PM

thanks for asking
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rabadger
Is it a two car garage? Can you go up and give the inlaws more room?

actually, the garage is on the other hand, actually already has a play/extra room over it.

my house is long, the living area is actually on the other end where i want to raise the 2nd floor.

shopdust 04-16-2005 01:20 AM

All the Building codes I know of allow two stories on 2" X 4" Studs at 16" spacing, so walls are not a problem.
To select a good builder, have a quite chat with the credit managers of LOCAL building supply outfits. That doesn't include Lowes and Home Depot. Don't just look at certificates of insurence, call the agents or companies that issued them to see if their current.
The first thing bum contractors (ya there are a few) do is let the policy lapse for non payment.


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