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Old 01-25-2011, 01:23 PM   #16
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


yeah that is exactly how mine worked, I said build be a 45'x35' house, thats exactly what I got a 45x35 slab. Its all in the little details. I said pour me a basement with floor drains on each end, thats exactly what I got. What I didn't get was a slab that gradually sloped to them drains, because I wasn't that specific with my details, I just assumed.

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Old 01-25-2011, 01:29 PM   #17
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


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so then they should have taken the room sizes into account right? i as a buyer only assume that the rooms will be the size that they state on the blueprint.
thanks!

I've had three different renovations done on my house. The one thing all common to all three projects is none of them read the plans (except the electricians). If you want things done according to plan, the only way to make sure is to either be there, or have someone else be there.

If your foundation is the correct size, then the space is all there, it's jut a question of where (i.e., which room is larger due to one being smaller).

I'm sure there are contractors out there who closely follow plans. Probably those more accustomed to working with architects. But there are also contractors who are used to "close enough" being a perfectly acceptable standard.
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Old 01-25-2011, 01:58 PM   #18
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


yes this may be what i'm running into.
thanks!
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Old 01-25-2011, 02:00 PM   #19
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


OMG! and this project has only just begun!!!
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Old 01-25-2011, 02:02 PM   #20
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


sigh.
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Old 01-25-2011, 02:09 PM   #21
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


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sigh.
Ayuh,... This appears, atleast to me, to be nothing but an Uninformed Buyer, questioning Industry Standards....
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Old 01-25-2011, 02:15 PM   #22
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


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I've had three different renovations done on my house. The one thing all common to all three projects is none of them read the plans (except the electricians). If you want things done according to plan, the only way to make sure is to either be there, or have someone else be there.
I've found this to be the case, on and off, depending on who you work with. I worked with an excavator who was dead set on talking with me every day, going over the plans to the smallest of details, and making phone calls when unforeseen issues arise. It was an absolute pleasure to work with the guy and, I would recommend him to anyone. His professionalism was through the roof and only exceeded by the quality of his work.

Then, I've dealt with foundation guys and builders who "do it how they do it" and make quick glances at the plans and show absolutely no ability to adjust to changing circumstances.

For instance, when going over the plans for my house, I noticed the draftsman made a mistake (numerous, to be honest; some less serious than others) that needed to be corrected. Since we have a colonial/craftsman style house, we have the traditional style colonial pattern in the front (i.e., first and second floor stacked windows).

Well, in reading the plans, I noticed that the top windows were not set over the bottom windows (they were off by 10"). In consulting my draftsman, I found out he forgot to move those after he moved the bottom windows, which were moved because the original placement had two of them partially behind porch posts, rather than in between them.

We had been working with the builder, making updates as we went along, giving him a set of plans to work off that were current. I mentioned to him that there were issues on the second floor and, should he get to that point, consult me before continuing on. He assured me he would. Well, he blew right through putting up the top floor front wall, incorrect measurements on window placement and all.

Sure, he went by the 'plans', but he also failed to follow through on his promise to consult me, and furthermore, he showed extremely little common sense in at least measuring bottom window placement to make sure upper matched. An argument ensued, as the only 'fix' that I would accept was that which had the windows in the correct place, even though that meant him wasting an entire day of work.

As someone alluded to above, don't expect common sense. The only stupid questions are the ones not asked. Stay on top of it, ask questions, and above all else, scrutinize the work to make sure it's being done right. Better to find out early when it can still be fixed than later when it has to be 'worked around'.
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Old 01-25-2011, 02:24 PM   #23
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


Isn't it unfortunate Cheri that home owners or those building a home must be an architect, electrician, plumber, carpenter, roofer and on and on to ensure YOUR house is built or repaired correctly.

I'm only remodeling a house but before any trade performs work on MY house, I research and study just exactly what will be done. And yes, some do not like it.

He's an example. I contracted to have a water softener installed. The company (licenced plumbers) wanted to install a P-trap with vent pipe under the crawlspace so softener re-generation water could use the waste line. I pointed out that it the waste line were to plug-up down from that connection, all the waste water from the house would flow out the vent pipe and into the crawlspace. So, if I had not asked exactly what they were going to do, at some point in the future I may have had a real "mess" in my crawlspace.

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Old 01-25-2011, 02:25 PM   #24
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


AgentW - great words of wisdom i must say! yes, i know that we need to be there and constantly ask questions but my husband and i have no knowledge in the area of building and are doing the best we can with the research that we are diligently trying to tackle. so much to do. i seriously didn't think that the room sizes would be an issue as they are stated on the blueprint but am finding out the hard way that the fine print is not always in written word.
thanks!
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Old 01-25-2011, 03:00 PM   #25
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


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He's an example. I contracted to have a water softener installed. The company (licenced plumbers) wanted to install a P-trap with vent pipe under the crawlspace so softener re-generation water could use the waste line. I pointed out that it the waste line were to plug-up down from that connection, all the waste water from the house would flow out the vent pipe and into the crawlspace. So, if I had not asked exactly what they were going to do, at some point in the future I may have had a real "mess" in my crawlspace.
A little bit of common sense on the contractors part would have been nice.

My builder actually laid out our floor joists from back to front, rather than front to back. Due to this, the spacing was opposite the drawings, as 16" O.C. started from the back and not the front as it was supposed to. Due to this, I had to move a toilet and redo the plumbing and hood vent designs to use different bays (had to move the toilet entirely, as it now sat directly on top of a joist).
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Old 01-25-2011, 03:07 PM   #26
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


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Originally Posted by CheriAlli View Post
AgentW - great words of wisdom i must say! yes, i know that we need to be there and constantly ask questions but my husband and i have no knowledge in the area of building and are doing the best we can with the research that we are diligently trying to tackle. so much to do. i seriously didn't think that the room sizes would be an issue as they are stated on the blueprint but am finding out the hard way that the fine print is not always in written word.
thanks!
One other small bit of advice if you're not using a construction loan from your bank. Do NOT make down payments on anything other than material on site. Be careful not to give out money before labor is actually completed. However, try to work with your contractor using a more timely payment method.

For example, as mentioned above, I refused to provide any down payments to any contractors. I would provide money for material purchases, but would not provide any down payment on labor. However, I worked with the contractors so that I would pay them every Friday, based upon work completed/work to go. This way, I made sure my contractors were always paid timely and were not waiting on money, while also covering myself so that, should they walk off the job, I'm not under water where I spent money on uncompleted work.

If you're working with a G.C. and a construction loan from a bank, then this is already built into the process (except the G.C. covers all costs until a disbursement point).
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Old 01-25-2011, 03:11 PM   #27
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


yes working with a GC so i think that part is all figured out.
but thanks for the advise, good to know for smaller projects going forward.
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Old 01-25-2011, 09:29 PM   #28
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


If you have a complete set of construction plans (not preliminary plans) there should be very clear dimensions for wall placements. It sound like you're more concerned with the room dimensions commonly found in parenthesis under the room label. Example:

Bedroom #2
(12' by 11')

These dimensions are often times vague and inaccurate. Actual specific dimensions (the ones with the arrows) supersede the room sizes listed in parenthesis. If this is indeed your concern, I'd suggest talking with the professional that drew the blueprints. But, if you read the small notes closer, this may already be mentioned in his disclaimer. It would be nice to know a little more about the apparent discrepencies here.

As for replying to specific posts, just hit the "quote" tab rather than the "quick reply" tab, and it will be apparent to all who & what you're responding to.
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Old 01-25-2011, 09:48 PM   #29
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


Cheri,
Without seeing the prints, this thread is a moot point. I used to build houses, from 1700-7000 sq.ft. I drew the plans for just about all of them. After the first few hand drawn on a drafting board, I starting using autocad. Different people dimension their prints in different ways. On exterior 2 x 4 walls, I used 4" as a dimension, interior walls 3 1/2". I did not include drywall. So if you had a room that was listed on the print as 12' x 12', you would lose 1" in each direction, but that's it, not 2 or 3". The reason I did it this way was to ensure the framer had the correct dimensions when he was working with just the wood, follow me? If you included drywall or any other finish materials in the dimension, he would have to allow for that and you would have a lot more errors. I never had anyone question the size of a room do to the drywall being added.
Assuming your prints are dimensioned correctly, then the walls should be where the print says they should be, in accordance to how the dimensions were originally figured. Some prints I have seen had all their interior dimension taken from the centerpoint of each wall. Very confusing for the framer. Much easier to pull a tape from wall to wall. All this being said, the foundation is drawn to the same outer dimensions as your first floor exterior walls including their outer sheathing (cdx plywood or osb, etc.). No one looks at a print and says, "Gee, we're going to lose a few inches for drywall, so I'll make the foundation that much bigger." Doesn't happen that way. The foundation is built to what the print says, right or wrong. So, in closing, it is very important to have correctly drawn prints, and a basic understanding as to what the dimensions mean. The builder might have thought this was basic knowledge, but to someone building their first house, it might not be. Sit down with your builder and go over the prints and verify that the walls haven't been moved because a framer read the print wrong. Other than that, I don't see a whole lot changing.
Good luck,
Mike Hawkins

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Old 01-25-2011, 10:02 PM   #30
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Actual room sizes not as large as the Blueprint measurements!


cheri, can you post a section of the print, like a room where the dimensions are listed? Depending on how the measurements are indicated, there can be a variety of differing dimensions but all of them be correct.

Often times, a room dimension is not exact. On top of that, often times a room gets adjusted or fudged a bit to make everything fit together properly. In a perfect world, you wouldn't need to do it but we don't live in a perfect world.

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