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Old 04-18-2009, 01:11 PM   #16
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


I'm a proffesional fence installer have been for over 20 years and that's the most absurd thing I've ever seen.The only reason I can think of as to why they did that would have been a root or stump in the ground.If there is something in the ground that can't be removed they should have moved the hole back along the fence line and just shortened the section.I'd have them fix it there's just no reason that.
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Old 04-18-2009, 02:47 PM   #17
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


RANT

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Old 04-18-2009, 06:57 PM   #18
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


If it's not fixed, I would hide it with a tall and bushy plant...
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Old 04-18-2009, 07:40 PM   #19
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


No, that is not acceptaple. Call them and have them move the post to the fence line.

I would imagine there was a root or something in the spot where the post should go so they moved it back. I will make a run shorter when I come across this situation to get around whatever is in the ground.
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Old 04-19-2009, 09:53 PM   #20
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


I have seen a lot of bad fence jobs in my day and that is near the top of the "crap" pile.

Completely unacceptable in my eyes. If I was the customer I wouldn't pay. If I was the contractor, there is no way on earth I would ever do a job that poorly.
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Old 04-20-2009, 03:25 AM   #21
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


Quote:
Originally Posted by snake2k View Post
I'm a proffesional fence installer have been for over 20 years and that's the most absurd thing I've ever seen.The only reason I can think of as to why they did that would have been a root or stump in the ground.If there is something in the ground that can't be removed they should have moved the hole back along the fence line and just shortened the section.I'd have them fix it there's just no reason that.
mgraeber: Snake makes a very good point. I suspect this was the case in that something was in the way and it appears the location of the post was the result of not being able to get through what ever was below. But frankly, there are ways to get around that without doing what they decided to do.

So with all of this feedback I'm curious: How are you going to pursue this problem from here on with your contractor? You've had many verying opinions on this topic. I'm very interested as to what will be the first words out of your contractor?
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Old 04-20-2009, 09:36 AM   #22
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


"Hackey", I like it , Dave. Sounds like a good nick name for my older brother.
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Old 04-20-2009, 12:16 PM   #23
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


Is the misplaced post on your neighbors property because of the misplacement? That would factor into leaving it or fixing it.
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Old 04-20-2009, 12:35 PM   #24
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


The worst part about it is they used a peice of "dunnage" lumber to scab it together. You can see it's relieved to accept metal banding. If your gonna have the "bad" side of the fence to your neighbors, the least you can do is call the contractor back to repair this in a less nticeable fashion. It woul probably only take him 15 mins. to fix. Who knows, if the boss was never around, he may not have even seen was his "crew" did. He may appreciate you letting him know what kind of desperate measures his crew is taking.
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Old 04-20-2009, 01:39 PM   #25
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


I guess there are several issues

Is the work acceptable to you at the price you paid?

Where are you located? Hurricane area? I can't see that they secured all of the posts together securely. It's possible if that if that comes lose in the wind you could be held liable for damage. Unlikely maybe......

Is the added wood PT? If not it will rot out faster. Even faster if you are in a humid area

Resale value. If you go to sell & they see this they will subtract from the value of the house

Neighbors - if it is "buried" in 15' deep of growth they may not care. I hope that all of the fence is on your property. If not a future neighbor may force you to move it, I would

300' of fence/8 for $4300 = $115 per 8' section
Not counting the gates, that isn't a bad price
But - the fence lateral supports are 1x6 - not very strong
And they hacked the support - how many locations?
If it is multiple locations in a row then the fence is severaly weakened IMO

Even if I couldn't see that hack job, it would bother me
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Old 04-20-2009, 02:00 PM   #26
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


Buy him a roll of string and tell him to do it again, and use 2x6 for the stringers this time.
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Old 04-20-2009, 02:39 PM   #27
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


Well, from my view I'd say the stringers are 2x6 and do not appear to be PT either. Most od the fences around here only have PT posts. So the fact that his "work around" is not PT is likely not an issue. The PT post is mainly to protect the buried part. Though humidity is not much of an issue here. I'm curious how the posts are set: just backfilled or poured concrete. If this was not done to more than one post in a row it would likely be fine if posts were set in concrete (also a lot harder fix, though I don't know what soil is like). It they were just backfilled with native soil they may start to lean after a few years from the wieght on the one side causing a twisting motion and the soil compacting, and you can't completly rule it out for concrete either. Especially if it's pre'loaded to pull that direction (stringers were pulled into meet the modified post).

But anyway you look at it, hack job.

Best of luck.
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Old 04-20-2009, 03:09 PM   #28
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


I would want that fixed. That fence should be on your property a long time. Do you really want to wonder if you should have done something about for the next 10 or 20 years. Or worse, in 10 or 20 years you figure out for sure you should have had it fixed.

If you decide to leave it as is and you paid for a treated lumber I would at least make sure it is all treated lumber.

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Old 04-20-2009, 08:54 PM   #29
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


[QUOTE the fences around here only have PT posts. So the fact that his "work around" is not PT is likely not an issue.[/QUOTE]

so if all fences are built substandard then its OK if you fence is too?

maybe if its a desert with no rain and no humidity. then perhaps that wood will last.

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Old 04-22-2009, 05:26 PM   #30
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Is this acceptable for a wood fence?


This was done in 7 places, 3 with one 2x4, 3 with 2 2x4s, and 1 with 3 2x4s. I called the contractor, and initially, he said they would do what they had to do to make me happy. That was after he suggested that it was probably done to avoid stumps or trees. The next time I talked to him, he said that he had talked to his boss and to the guy who had done the work, and that it had been done to avoid stumps or trees. I doubt that this is true. The place where there are 3 stacked is near a large pine tree (some of you have said that the post should have been moved along the line instead of what was done), but as far as I can tell, the others didn't happen because of trees or stumps. The posts are concreted into the ground. I think that the 2x4s are treated - the ones that I found with stickers said they were. I want this fence to last - that's why I paid professionals to do it. If it is a structural problem, I would like it fixed. It is true that they were working at the edge of a wooded area (so I would like to know if it is unreasonable to expect them to fix it). If it is merely appearance, I'm not as concerned about it. Someone made a good point about making sure the post is still on our property. Before I contracted the company, I asked about surveying the property, and they asked if we had a plat map (we found 3 of our 4 corner markers), but then they didn't ask for it once they got to the site.
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