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Old 04-04-2012, 08:46 AM   #16
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Is this acceptable method of securing beam to concrete pier?


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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
. Make sure you wear a NIOSH approved mask when you do this, concrete dust is very bad for your lungs. And make sure you use a diamond blade, the carbide masonry blades are worthless on hard concrete.
Have the good blade for this Put a retaining wall in for some landscaping. Hot dry day and high winds made for some spectacular dust clouds when cutting!!!

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Old 04-04-2012, 04:59 PM   #17
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Is this acceptable method of securing beam to concrete pier?


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Originally Posted by Quicksmoke View Post
Is it acceptable to notch out about 1/2" from a 2x 2x8" beam? There are 3 piers this beam will sit on, with the 2 outer piers pushed to the far edge, span of ~14'

Not worried about inspector. He was only worried about the piers meeting the 36" depth before pouring the concrete. Just need to make sure I'm using approved connectors, in this case sounds like sinking a bolt with epoxy and one of the various stand off plates to saddle the beam.
These post base connectors usually have a 1" standoff. If the beam is going to sit on allot of the concrete pier, I might use two post bases side by side so that the weight is distributed over a wider area. I think it might look better as well. If the beam is only going to rest on half the pier, then I would just use 1 4"x5" post base. In one of your earlier posts, it looked like you gave the dimensions of the beam as 2x2x8, which doesn't make any sense. Did I read that right?

Generally, you can notch up to 1/4 of the beam height, but that is something to ask the inspector. That is a dimension that is applied to a joist where the bottom edge of the joist will be supported by a hanger. This case is a bit different, so I would get their advice. If you cut into the concrete 1" using a grinding saw, then the issue goes away. You can probably rent a saw for this that wouldn't be too hard to use.

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Old 04-05-2012, 11:34 AM   #18
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Is this acceptable method of securing beam to concrete pier?


Just found this base from simpson:
http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/EPB44T.asp

This could potentially solve my issue. I'd have to drill a pilot hole into the beam to allow the bolt to insert freely. I'd have to still notch the pier to countersink the lock nut and washer to allow the beam to set at the correct level.

The beam is a doubled up 2x8" (x2 - 2" x 8").

This this may be better, or just go with plan of using stand off base?

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