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-   -   8 foot tall privacy wall (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/8-foot-tall-privacy-wall-115422/)

klie-de-sys 08-27-2011 12:52 PM

8 foot tall privacy wall
 
We're gonna build a 14 ft. wide and 8 ft. tall brick privacy wall with two 16' x 16" brick columns. One end (column) of the wall will adjoin the corner of the brick house and another column (end) of the privacy wall will stand on its own and will be connected later to the end post of the to be installed vinyl fence. The brick layer suggests that 2 rows of bricks (8") wall thickness is enough. There will be two wrought-iron-bar decorative "windows" (no glass) in this wall. How do you best adjoin the brick column to the corner of the brick house? Please confirm or advise whether 8" thickness is sufficient enough for a 8 foot tall piece of a fence.

I assume permit is unnecessary for a project of such a small scale?

Thank you guys very much in advance for your great advice.

P.S. Bricklayers or bricklaying deserve their or its own subforum. :thumbup:

concretemasonry 08-27-2011 01:11 PM

If you are 8' high, a permit may be required. It is not necessarily a question of the cost of the job, but structural adequacy and prevention of injury. I have seen 6' high walls on a shallow footing that were turned into sidewalks after a big wind.

In California the 6' high masonry privacy walls do have some reinforcement in the wall. Most city building departments also supply standardized suggested designs.

Since you are connecting it to your brick home, you should a footing the same depth as you home foundation to avoid any differential settlement. You did not post your location which is important for this kind of question. I you have frost, the frost could heave the wall and destroy a good part of the brick on the home.

Dick

havalife 08-27-2011 01:29 PM

Go and ask your building department. In my part of Arizona I have to have a permit for any wall 5' or more in the cities around me, in So Cal it all depends on the city. The last thing you want is to have a building official pull up as you are putting the last brick in:eek:

klie-de-sys 08-27-2011 01:36 PM

Thanks C/M. I was told the footing will be poured in concrete 1 foot deep. The wall will be reinforced with wire. I think they mentioned rebar in the footing and do you think for such a tall wall there should be vertical and/or horizontal REBARS added inside of the wall as well in addition to the perpendicular wire connecting the two rows of the brick?

I don't mean to worry about the cost, but I was wondering whether two rows (8") of bricks are thick enough for a 8 ft. tall wall or should there be 3 rows (12") of brick instead?

My location is Columbia, South Carolina. No frost during the day. The ground does not freeze year round.

Right here in this county when you call the authorities they won't even know whether you need a permit or not. Happened to me a couple times when I wanted to build a metal storage building, they (the "building department" told me no-yes, yes-no, nay-ye, and then he said he's not sure... so I don't take them seriously anymore. :no:

Did you know? Where I am at they just introduced zoning just 2 years ago. Very relaxed.

havalife 08-27-2011 01:58 PM

I would think you would want a minimum of #6 rebar at 48"oc grouted. I have not done an 8' brick wall before I mostly use CMU.

klie-de-sys 08-27-2011 02:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by havalife (Post 716123)
I would think you would want a minimum of #6 rebar at 48"oc grouted. I have not done an 8' brick wall before I mostly use CMU.

Havalife thanks. Could you please explain what does "48"oc grouted" mean and what is a "CMU"?

Ninjaframer 08-27-2011 02:49 PM

Rebar every 48" fill the block solid with grout, concrete masonry unit.

ddawg16 08-27-2011 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by klie-de-sys (Post 716127)
Havalife thanks. Could you please explain what does "48"oc grouted" mean and what is a "CMU"?

OC = On Center

Like havalife says....rebar every 48" sticking up from your footing....and once it's done you fill up the cavities with concrete....at least where the rebar is....

Additionally, you should have horizontal rebar about every 3-4 rows. They make block that has a little notch centered in the bottom so that the rebar will fit.

To be honest....12" down is not very deep....especially in the sandy soil you have there in SC. I would suggest at least 18" if not 24"....you want it to be at least a foot thick and I would put in at least 2 #3 or #4 bars horizitaly. That will go a long way to reducing the chances of cracks....especially if the wall is near any trees....the roots can really tear up a wall that is not built right.

klie-de-sys 08-27-2011 04:06 PM

Thanks ddawg16 and everyone for the very detailed help. I'm gonna ask to make the footer deeper than 12". Could you please still specify to my original question about the THICKNESS of the wall? Please note we will be using BRICK, not blocks.

Are two rows (8") of bricks thick enough for a 8 ft. tall wall or should there be 3 rows (12") of brick instead (for an EIGHT FOOT tall wall)?

Thanks a lot in advance again.

stuart45 08-27-2011 04:11 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I would build a wall of that height 3 bricks thick. Here's some recommended thickness.
http://www.woking.gov.uk/planning/bu...ce/gardenwalls

Another method is to use Quetta bond.
Attachment 37331

ddawg16 08-27-2011 05:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stuart45 (Post 716194)
I would build a wall of that height 3 bricks thick. Here's some recommended thickness.
http://www.woking.gov.uk/planning/bu...ce/gardenwalls

Another method is to use Quetta bond.
Attachment 37331

Yea....like that.....

Woking? I know the area....best damned Leak sauges in the world....I have family from the Guilford area....my wife is from Preston....

havalife 08-27-2011 08:09 PM

I like what Stuart45 showed it looks like it will last if you dig a good footing. Your contractor may not like it but I would push for this type of build. What are you planning on for the columns?

stuart45 08-28-2011 05:42 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 716237)
Yea....like that.....

Woking? I know the area....best damned Leak sauges in the world

Thanks for the tip, always handy to know where the best grub is at:laughing:
havalife is spot on when he says you need a good footing.
Dick also makes a good point about differential movement when attaching a garden wall to your house. Nowadays we tend to leave a small movement gap between the pier and the house. If you really want it all connected up you can use these, which we normally use for tying in a new extension.

Attachment 37351


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