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-   -   8" cinder block with a brick ledge on top? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/8-cinder-block-brick-ledge-top-110571/)

adam1979 07-12-2011 09:22 PM

8" cinder block with a brick ledge on top?
 
We have started construction and My bottom level is made of 8 inch cinder blocks. We are thinking from going from hardie planks or shingles to now bricks, is there a way we can have a brick ledge on top of that?

Ron6519 07-12-2011 09:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by adam1979 (Post 685067)
We have started construction and My bottom level is made of 8 inch cinder blocks. We are thinking from going from hardie planks or shingles to now bricks, is there a way we can have a brick ledge on top of that?

You started construction on what, exactly?

Bud Cline 07-12-2011 09:35 PM

Quote:

We have started construction and My bottom level is made of 8 inch cinder blocks.
Okay got that part! What do the cinder blocks rest on?

Quote:

We are thinking from going from hardie planks or shingles to now bricks,
Okay now I'm lost. What are "now bricks"? Are you saying "new bricks"?

Quote:

is there a way we can have a brick ledge on top of that?
On top of what?

Let's try again.:)

jomama45 07-13-2011 12:05 PM

Unless you want to shrink the house for the brick, simply lay another wythe of 4" block down to the footing and backfill it.

concretemasonry 07-13-2011 03:46 PM

You will not be able to buy a cinder block unless you have deep pockets since they have not been made for decades.

If you have made the mistake of not planing ahead or not having good plans, in some areas you can get a special block for the top course to provide a legal brick ledge (depending in the above grade wall width). The block has a top wider than the bottom, but they are rare due to the need for them.

On my lake home, I used 14" thick block (a small amount of material and labor cost) to build a foundation/basement for a upper exterior wall of 4" clay brick veneer, 2" insulation/air gap and 8" block walls. Since I bought the block, the contractor would lay 10", 12", 14" block or 16" block for the same price. A little more for 4" if it was exposed. The result was a good finished job with no detail, insulation or waterproofing problems. I could have corbelled out the buried wall thickness ot used a block with top 2" wider than the base, but it was not worth the trouble.

Dick

BigJim 07-13-2011 09:08 PM

I may be understanding it all wrong also but if you have a wide enough footing to set the brick on there shouldn't be a problem.

concretemasonry 07-13-2011 09:28 PM

If you are doing a full basement depth, some people like to save a few pwnnies on a smaller width block and just used a corbelled block(2" wider at the top), but any masonry can be corbeled out, but most contractors like to do it the straight forward approach.

I have also seen basements built with a separate layer of 4" block just to support the brick (cheaper material and labor) and the transition from 4" block to brick can be tailored to the finished grade.

In my case, I used 14" wide block x 16" long because they were available in stock and it was easier for everyone, especially the contractor. But the "Cadillac" of walls (8" super lightweight block, 2" XPS styoroam and 4" clay brick) is rare on residential but is used on some commercial work.

The width of the footings are usually too much, but contractors like to use a stanard modular dimension (16", 20", 24") since the concrete is cheap and it gives a little extra room so prelimary layout does not to be as exact. - Nothing to do with the vertical load usually.

Dick


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