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-   -   60" Sliding Door Installation in Load Bearing Exterior Wall (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/60-sliding-door-installation-load-bearing-exterior-wall-179167/)

kirbz 05-09-2013 04:22 PM

60" Sliding Door Installation in Load Bearing Exterior Wall
 
Howdy,

I want to install a 60" wide sliding patio door on an exterior load bearing wall. I have already placed two 8' king studs to the existing top plate without removing any of the existing studs in between (a total of 3 studs).

My question is this: Now that I've put in 2 new studs (king studs for the patio door) and I want to remove the 3 older studs (at 16" spacing) in between the two king studs which is a 60" span and then build my header/jack for the door, do I need shoring/support for this?

My logic, I've put in two new studs (king studs for the the door) but they would have 60" in between without any support...my iffy logic being that if I added 2 studs (albeit at 60" apart) and would be removing 3 old studs, it would be minus one stud for support for about 40 mins of work for me to build the door frame/header.

Thanks

brockmiera 05-09-2013 04:30 PM

Yes you need to frame a support wall approx 3' from the exterior wall.

Its not a stud for stud calculation. Its how the double top plate will now transfer all the loads from above it horizontally to your new king studs and then down the path to foundation. There will be vertical deflection in your top plate because you are making the distance between vertical supports greater.

Think about standing 1' out on a diving board. Then go out to 4' the board moves more right? Similar principle.

How are you only taking out 3 studs? Are they 24" on center?

What are you using for your header?

Build the header before you take out any support studs or frame the support wall for that matter.

GBrackins 05-09-2013 04:32 PM

Welcome to the Forum!

not knowing what loads are on your load bearing wall I tend to be conservative and would build a temporary wall to support those loads before taking anything out. You'll need to ensure your header is properly sized for the span and loads it must support.

You could try it your way, but what would you do if the double top plates fails???

GBrackins 05-09-2013 04:32 PM

great minds think alike Brock .... LOL

brockmiera 05-09-2013 04:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBrackins (Post 1175931)
great minds think alike Brock .... LOL

No doubt. I just hope his next post isn't.....How do I go about fixing roof trusses???

brockmiera 05-09-2013 04:54 PM

FYI you are going to need more than 60" between your King studs in order to install a 60" door. You will need at least one Jack stud per side to support your header so if you are 60" inside to inside now you will end up 57" when your header is installed.

kirbz 05-09-2013 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brockmiera (Post 1175938)
FYI you are going to need more than 60" between your King studs in order to install a 60" door. You will need at least one Jack stud per side to support your header so if you are 60" inside to inside now you will end up 57" when your header is installed.


I should have clarified, I was concerned with the load bearing wall issue...It's actually 63" from king to king...thanks

GBrackins 05-09-2013 05:08 PM

you may want to edit your profile to include your location, city and state are sufficient. Many answers to questions are based upon your location, for example .....

depending on your wind loads you may need 3 king studs in addition to the jack (each side) for a 5'-0" opening in an exterior load bearing wall according to the Wood Frame Construction Manual.

rossfingal 05-09-2013 05:17 PM

What is the size of the existing headers?


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